• 2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo

    2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo
  • Aggressive body kit
  • Redesigned front bumper
  • New cooling vents
  • Massive rear wing and fin
  • New diffuser
  • More downforce at high speed
  • Same output as FXX-K
  • Same F1 dual-clutch transmission
  • Revised suspension for extra downforce
  • Improved brake cooling
  • Better power-to-weight ratio

The ultimate LaFerrari!

When a high-profile carmaker such as Ferrari launches a great supercar like the LaFerrari, it’s difficult to imagine a way to significantly improve the design. But the team from Maranello has already done it twice. First, Ferrari launched the FXX-K, a track-only LaFerrari with enhanced aerodynamics. This happened back in 2015. Two years have passed, and the Prancing Horse found a way to make the FXX-K even more brutal. It’s called the FXX-K Evo, and it has more downforce than any Ferrari to date!

Launched at the 2017 Finali Mondiale of the Ferrari Challenge, the FXX-K Evo takes the familiar FXX-K to a new level in the same way that the Enzo-based FXX Evoluzione was a heavily upgraded FXX. Just like the FXX-K, the Evo is not homologated for road use, and production will be limited to only a few models. However, the Evo is also available as an upgrade to the standard FXX-K. The package includes many add-ons, starting with an aerodynamic kit built upon know-how obtained from the many racing series Ferrari competes in, including Formula One, GT3, GTE, and Challenge. It’s also lighter due to increased use of carbon-fiber and despite having a much larger rear wing. Yes, the FXX-K is a monster of a LaFerrari so keep reading my full review to find out more.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari FXX-K Evo.

  • 2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo
  • Year:
    2018
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    V12
  • Transmission:
    seven-speed, F1 dual-clutch
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    1036
  • Torque @ RPM:
    664
  • Displacement:
    6.3 L
  • 0-60 time:
    2.5 sec. (Est.)
  • Top Speed:
    217 mph (Est.)
  • Price:
  • car segment:
  • size:
  • Purpose:
  • body style:

Exterior

  • Aggressive body kit
  • Redesigned front bumper
  • New cooling vents
  • Massive rear wing and fin
  • New diffuser
  • More downforce at high speed
2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 741340
Aggressive body kit
Much like any evolution of an existing design, the FXX-K Evo retains most of the design cues of the FXX-K

Much like any evolution of an existing design, the FXX-K Evo retains most of the design cues of the FXX-K and the LaFerrari. But the significantly redesigned aero package adds quite a few new features front and rear. The aerodynamics were modification after one year of simulations and wind tunnel testing, with Ferrari claiming that the car now boasts downforce figures that are very close to GT3 and GTE cars. Specifically, downforce improved by a whopping 23 percent over FXX K and an incredible 75 percent over the standard LaFerrari. In exact figures, the Evo generates 1,411 pounds at 124 mph, and exceeds 1,829 pounds at the car’s red-line speed. So this package basically pushes an already amazing car to the very limit.

There aero enhancements modify the FXX-K’s appearance a lot, starting with a more menacing front end. The geometry of the sides of the front bumper was altered by hollowing out the surfaces beneath the headlamps, as well as by adding couple of flicks divided by a vertical turning vane. There’s also an additional intake ahead of the front wheels. All these elements contribute to a 10-percent downforce gain over the standard FXX-K. Ground effects were also boosted by new vortex generators in the undertray.

2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 741335
More downforce at high speed
The significantly redesigned aero package adds quite a few new features front and rear

There aren’t many visual changes to talk about onto the sides, but Ferrari added enlarged rear wheel arch vents. Also part of the package design to make the car more aerodynamic, these improved flow to the rear diffuser, which results in a five-percent downforce boost.

Bigger changes are noticeable around the back. The main highlight is obviously the fixed rear wing. Whereas the FXX-K has those weird horizontal elements glues to the side fins, the Evo badge brought a proper wing to the supercar. But it’s by no means a regular wing. The element has a twin-profile design and a big central fin similar to those seen on prototype Le Mans cars. The central fin acts as a vertical fin, boosting stability at low yaw angles, but ut also supports the three triangular vortex generators. The latter clean the flow field striking the wing of the effects of the hot air coming from the radiators which vent onto the engine hood. Additionally, they create a downwash component in the flow which boosts the wings downforce capacity, resulting in a 10-percent increase over the regular FXX-K.

The wing also works in conjunction with the active spoiler, which had its control logics and range of movement reviewed and reprogrammed for optimized results. Below the wing, we can see a revised center fascia that include one instead of two vertical slats above the diffuser. In addition to the huge side vents, Ferrari also redesigned the diffuser, adding wings on each side and red accents on the main elements.

Interior

  • New steering wheel
  • Repositioned KERS Manettino
  • Larger 6.5-inch display
2015 Ferrari FXX K Interior
- image 580997

Note: Standard Ferrari FXX K pictured here.

The new steering wheel has Formula 1 design with integrated gear-shifting paddles and KERS Manettino

Ferrari has yet to publish any images of the interior as of this writing, but it’s safe to assume that changes compared to the standard FXX-K are slim. The Italians actually mention a new steering wheel that’s "brilliantly suited to hugely powerful performance levels achievable in the FXX-K Evo." It has a Formula 1 design with integrated gear-shifting paddles and sports the KERS Manettino for improved ergonomics. The rear camera display to the right of the driver has been replaced with a larger 6.5-inch unit that also displays data from a new telemetry system. The new display includes clearer, more direct performance parameter and car status readouts.

The rear camera display to the right of the driver has been replaced with a larger 6.5-inch unit

Other than that, look for the usual FXX-K specs, which translates into a rather spartan configuration when compared to the LaFerrari. The Italians ditched all the luxury and convenience features of the road car and replaced them with race-spec, lightweight components. Highlights include a new center console and carbon-fiber inserts instead of soft-touch surfaces on the dashboard. The door panels are also plain carbon-fiber boards, like on any high-performance car.

The seats feature massive bolstering on the sides, a carbon structure and race-spec harnesses. The instrument cluster is also different than the LaFerrari’s, featuring new graphics and new display options, allowing the driver to monitor vital car data while on the track.

Drivetrain

  • Same output as FXX-K
  • Same F1 dual-clutch transmission
  • Revised suspension for extra downforce
  • Improved brake cooling
  • Better power-to-weight ratio
  • Likely quicker on the race track
2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 741333
Better power-to-weight ratio
Total output sits at 1,036 horsepower, while torque is rated at an equally impressive 664 pound-feet

The FXX-K Evo uses the same hybrid drivetrain as the regular FXX-K model. The combo brings together a 6.3-liter V-12 gasoline engine rated at 848 horsepower and an electric motor that packs 187 horses. Total output sits at 1,036 horsepower, while torque is rated at an equally impressive 664 pound-feet. For reference, that’s an extra 86 horsepower compared to the LaFerrari. The FXX-K Evo also uses the same seven-speed, F1 dual-clutch transmission.

But while the engine remained unchanged, Ferrari had to adjust the suspension to the car’s new aerodynamic efficiency figures. It also improved stopping power by redesigning the front brake air intakes for enhanced cooling.

2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 741337
Revised suspension for extra downforce
While the engine remained unchanged, Ferrari had to adjust the suspension to the car's new aerodynamics

There’s no word on performance, but the enhanced downforce and lighter curb weight should make it quicker in certain situations. While it likely won’t be quicker than the regular FXX-K from 0 to 60 mph (2.6 seconds), it should lap Ferrari’s Fiorano test track faster. With the FXX-K having completed the course in 1.14 minutes, five seconds than the standard LaFerrari, the FXX-K Evo should need around 1.13 minute to do the same.

So who light is the new Evo? Again, no information from Ferrari. But we do know that the FXX-K is some 198 pounds lighter than the LaFerrari, tipping the scales at around 2,767 pounds. The Evo should weigh in at a little less than 2,700, which might not sound like much, but it’s a great achievement given that is sports that massive wing and fin at the back.

Prices

2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 741339
Same output as FXX-K

Talking about pricing for limited-edition supercar like these is mostly about speculating as automakers rarely announce an official sticker. Just look at the standard FXX K. It was revealed back in 2015 and there’s no official price tag to talk about, although word has it that each owner paid at least $3 million to get one. Well, not as much as to buy it but borrow, because all 40 units remained with Ferrari for storage and maintenance, and the drivers only got them for specific events.

This is exactly what will happen with the FXX-K Evo, which will benefit from a very active XX Programme schedule in the 2018/2019 season, with nine track outings between early March and late October. Ferrari didn’t say how many car will be built and how many packages will be offered for upgrades, but I have a hunch that the Evo will be at least as exclusive, if not more, than the first FXX-K. So don’t expect more than 40 cars/upgrade packages.

Naturally, it will be more expensive than the FXX-K, likely close to $4 million, or even more than that if the limited edition includes significantly less models. Obviously, the cars should cost more than the upgrade, but we won’t get any specific figures any time soon. If there’s one thing I’m sure of, is that the FXX-K Evo is probably already sold out.

Competition

McLaren P1 GTR

2016 McLaren P1 GTR High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 617800

Also based on a road-legal hybrid supercar, the P1 GTR was designed in a similar way. It has an aerodynamically enhanced body with a host of race-spec add-ons, plus a massive wing at the back. The track-focused interior is loaded with carbon-fiber and features a spartan center console holding buttons and switches, and a steering wheel based on the unit used by the McLaren MP4-23 Formula One car. Sounds familiar? Motivation comes from the same hybrid drivetrain found in the road-legal P1, but the combo now includes a motorsport-optimized, 3.8-liter, twin-turbo V-8 and a lighter electric motor. The drivetrain sends 986 horsepower, 83 horses more than the standard P1, to the rear wheels, which translates into a 0-to-60 mph sprint of only 2.4 seconds, a 0.2-second improvement over the street-legal P1. At launch, pricing was set at around $3 million, a sticker that also included private consultations with the McLaren driver-fitness team and company design director Frank Stephenson, as well as access to one of McLaren’s dedicated racing simulators. Customers also gained access to several drive events held on various Formula One tracks. Production was limited to only 58 units.

Read our full review of the 2016 McLaren P1 GTR.

Aston Martin Vulcan AMR Pro

2018 Aston Martin Vulcan AMR Pro Exterior High Resolution Wallpaper quality
- image 721702

The Vulcan arrived in 2016 as Aston Martin’s first full-fledged supercar. Built on a bespoke platform and with unique design and aerodynamics, the Vulcan is also a track-only vehicle and comes with a racing program. Production was limited to only 24 units, each priced from around $2.3 million. But in 2017 the British firm announced an aerodynamically enhanced version. Called the AMR Pro, it’s basically similar to the FXX-K Evo, featuring a more aggressive aero pack. Not only is it menacing on the outside, the Vulcan is radical on th einside too. The bolstered seats, the no-nonsense dashboard, the carbon door panels, and the race-spec cabin remind of Le Mans race cars. But it’s the drivetrain that sets it apart. While the FXX-K Evo is a hybrid, the Vulcan AMR Pro is a naturally aspirated beast. The 7.0-liter V-12 cranks out 820 horsepower, which might not be as exotic as Ferrari’s 1,000+ rating, but it’s enough to push it to 60 mph in less than three seconds and up to a top speed of at least 200 mph. It rides on a pushrod suspension with anti-dive geometry and Multimatic’s Dynamic Suspension Spool Valve dampers, the latter providing high levels of adjustability. There’s also variable traction control and anti-lock braking, as well as Brembo carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Production is capped to 24 units, with prices likely exceeding the $3-million mark.

Check out the full story on the 2018 Aston Martin Vulcan AMR Pro.

Conclusion

2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 741337
Revised suspension for extra downforce

It’s been four years since Ferrari launched the LaFerrari and it’s pretty obvious that this supercar is from another world. The same goes for the FXX-K, which is not only more exclusive and expensive, but it’s also restricted to the race track and comes with a program that won’t allow its customers to take it home. The Evo takes everything up a notch. It’s more aggressive, likely limited to even less unit, and most certainly significantly more expensive. So why would you pay millions of dollars for a car that you only get to drive a few times a year and you can’t even park it in your garage? Well, I find it ridiculous, but I don’t have millions to spend on cars. So I’m pretty sure I can’t get the full picture here. But I can definitely understand the rush behind owning a very exotic and desirable race car with a Ferrari badge, even if "owning" means getting to see it and drive it a few times a year at the race track. This seemingly awkward ownership process may actually be what makes the FXX-K Evo such an appealing car.

  • Leave it
    • * Awfully expensive
    • * Very limited production run
    • * You can’t actually take it home

References

Ferrari FXX K

2015 Ferrari FXX K High Resolution Exterior
- image 632858

Read our full review on the 2015 Ferrari FXX K.

Ferrari LaFerrari

2014 Ferrari LaFerrari High Resolution Exterior
- image 495448

Read our full review on the 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari.

Ferrari XX History

2005 Ferrari FXX
- image 37826
Ferrari FXX

The XX program was launched in 2005, when Ferrari launched a higher-performance, race-spec version of the Enzo, the company’s flagship supercar at the time. Called the FXX, it was built in 30 units, one of which was sold to F1-legend Michael Schumacher, between 2005 and 2007. Powered by a 6.3-liter V-12, the first FXX came with 789 horsepower and 506 pound-feet of torque on tap. Hitting 60 mph took around 2.6 seconds, while top speed was rated at 214 mph. Although production ended in 2007, it wasn’t the end of the line of the beefed-up Enzo. The program continued until 2009 and telemetry data gathered from the FXX enabled Ferrari to launched the Evoluzione upgrade. Much like the new FXX-K Evo, the FXX Evoluzione had increased downforce, lowered aerodynamic drag, and updates to the engine, transmission, and chassis. Power was increased to 850 horsepower, while the 0-to-60 mph sprint decreased to 2.5 seconds, while made it the quickest Ferrari ever made.

2009 Ferrari 599XX
- image 296349
Ferrari 599XX

In 2009, the XX program was extended to the Ferrari 599 GTB, giving birth to the 599XX. Using significantly revised body work, a V-12 engine with 720 horsepower, and various chassis upgrades, the 599XX became the quickest production-derived sports car on the Nurburgring track, a title it held for a few months. The 599XX Evoluzione followed in 2011 with more aggressive aerodynamics, including a big rear wing, Pirelli tires, new electronics, 740 horsepower, and a better power-to-weight ratio. The 599XX Evoluzione was the last XX car until the FXX-K arrived in 2015.

Press release

The Finali Mondiali provided the backdrop to the world premiere of the new FXX-K Evo which will be available both as an extremely limited-run model and as an upgrade package for the existing XX cars.

This latest arrival marks a significant evolution of the XX programme launched in 2005 with cars developed specifically to play an active role in the eponymous research and development programme which itself has become a byword for innovation and uncompromising performance.

As was the case with the Evo versions of the FXX and the 599 XX, the Ferrari FXX-K Evo benefits from an extensive package that applies innovative concepts derived from all of the various track categories in which Ferrari competes with its cars: the Formula 1, GT3, GTE and Challenge, the latter being the single-make championship bearing its name.

Derived from the racing world and adopting track-specific content, the FXX-K Evo, like all the previous XX cars, is not homologated for road use and will not be used in competition outside its dedicated programme.

Mirroring the vocation of its predecessor, it, however, is aimed at a small, highly-select group of Ferrari Clients: supercar enthusiasts eager to share the development of technologically-innovative content with the Prancing Horse technicians, through driving a closed-wheel laboratory car.

At the development stage, the designers worked on a broad range of different aspects of the FXX-K Evo, starting with reducing its overall weight. By drawing on Ferrari’s Formula 1 experience and adopting innovative carbon-fibre component crafting processes, they succeeded in producing a lighter car than the previous FXX-K despite introducing new elements such as the fixed rear wing.

The FXX-K Evo features an evolved aero package developed by Ferrari’s engineers in synergy with the Ferrari Style Centre’s designers, to push to the very limit the performance of a model that already represents the state-of-the-art in terms of Ferrari track-only supercars.

The product of over a year of CFD simulations and wind tunnel testing, the FXX-K Evo’s aerodynamics deliver downforce figures very close to those of the cars competing in the GT3 and GTE championships, all to the advantage of lateral acceleration in cornering, stability and, ultimately, exhilarating driving pleasure.

The FXX-K Evo’s downforce coefficient has been improved by 23% on the previous version, which is the equivalent of a 75% increase on the road car from which it is derived. Downforce of 640 kg is generated at 200 km/h, and exceeds 830 kg at the car’s red-line speed.

The FXX-K Evo’s downforce level is boosted by a twin-profile fixed wing on the tail. This new addition was developed to work in seamless synergy with the active rear spoiler. In fact, the pressure fields developed by the two downforce-generating systems support and amplify each other. To guarantee both excellent downforce and drag results, the mobile spoiler’s control logics and range of movement were also meticulously reviewed and reprogrammed.

The twin-profile rear wing is supported by two side fins as well as by a central fin. The latter plays a dual role: firstly it acts as a vertical fin, boosting stability at low yaw angles, and secondly, it supports the action of the three delta (triangular) vortex generators.

The vortex generators, on the one hand, clean the flow field striking the wing of the effects of the wake of the hot air flow from the radiators which vents onto the bonnet. On the other, they create a downwash component in the flow which boosts the twin-profile’s downforce capacity. The result is a 10% increase in the downforce developed by the rear system.

The design of the rear bumpers was also modified in the light of the new flow structures. The by-pass vent from the rear wheel arch has been enlarged, hollowing out the volume behind the wheels to ensure the wake from the wheels is efficiently channelled. The result is that the flow to the rear diffuser is protected and losses are reduced so that downforce has been boosted by 5%.

The significant increase in rear downforce demanded in-depth review of the design of the front bumpers and underbody to guarantee a balanced development of the downforce.

The geometry of the sides of the front bumper was altered by hollowing out the surfaces beneath the headlights. This made space for a couple of flicks divided by a vertical turning vane and an additional intake ahead of the front wheels. This system guarantees efficient downforce generation (10% of the increase in downforce gained on the FXX-K). It also makes good use of know-how acquired in the GT programmes in which rules introduced in 2016 permitted extensive study of the interaction between horizontal (flicks) and vertical (dive plane) flow management systems, optimising their efficiency.

Ground effect was also boosted by the introduction of vortex generators on the undertray. This capitalised on the accelerations created by the rear system and the front underbody, generating 30% of the extra downforce the car delivers compared to the FXX-K.

The FXX-K Evo’s boosted performance also demanded new front brake air intakes which, although no wider to avoid increasing drag, are more efficient thanks to a complete redesign of the intake itself.

Furthermore, the suspension was specifically calibrated to adapt it to the car’s new aerodynamic efficiency figures.

The clearly racing-inspired cabin is characterised by a conceptually-different steering wheel brilliantly suited to hugely powerful performance levels achievable in the FXX-K Evo. Formula 1 derived with integrated gear-shifting paddles, the new steering wheel now also sports the KERS Manettino to improve both control of that system and overall ergonomics.

The rear video camera screen to the right of the driver has been replaced with a larger 6.5” version.

It also now displays data from a new telemetry system with clearer, more direct performance parameter and car status readouts. The driver can check the KERS status and the times being clocked by selecting from the various screen options available.

After undergoing around 5,000 km of development runs and 15,000 km of reliability test-drives, the FXX-K EVO will be a very active protagonist in the XX Programme in the 2018/2019 season which spans nine track outings in all between the start of March and the end of October. As is now traditional, the XX cars will also be taking part in the prestigious Finali Mondiali weekend which marks the end of each racing season.

View the full press release Hide press release
Press release
What do you think?
Car Finder: