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1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS

1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS

In terms of desirability, not much on four wheels can top the Ferrari 250 GT California Spider SWB. So when it came time forFerrari to build a follow up, it had its work cut out for it. The car that resulted was the 275 GTS, a convertible for the American market, despite the word “California” being left out of the name. And in pretty typical Ferrari fashion for the day, the GTS is a different vehicle from anything else with a 275 name, with differences going beyond the fact that the roof comes down.

The 275 GTS is based on the 275 GTB, which is about as close to standard as Ferrari nomenclature gets. But not only do the cars appear to be completely different models, they were built for different purposes. The GTB is a sports car, and so was the 275 GTB/4 that followed it, but the GTS was treated more as a grand tourer. And like a strangely large number of Ferrari convertibles from the era, it was also treated almost as more of a limited production special edition than a full-on production model. Odd when you consider how popular roofless Ferraris would turn out to be later.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 275 GTS.

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1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB

1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB

Ferrari’s history of dual-purpose sports-racers was well underway by the time the 275 GTB debuted in 1964. This car’s significance went beyond its fully independent suspension and rear transaxle, both firsts for Ferrari, however. The 275 GTB broke ground by adapting racing technology to a road car more seamlessly than before. The Pininfarina-designed 275 GTB was a perfectly domesticated gran turismo, rather than a racer with extra seats and a radio installed. The 275 GTB’s blend of on-track capability and creature comforts helped to light the path for many Ferraris to come.

Following on the heels of the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB faced significant challenges in Ferrari’s most important arena: the track. The Shelby Cobra presented a persistent and significant challenge, and the diminutive Porsche 904 was also a threat. Ferrari needed to match these cars on the track without compromising the 275 GTB’s road manners, which proved to be no small feat.

Most critics would argue that it succeeded. The replacement for the 250 series has become one of the most iconic (and valuable) Ferraris as the years have gone by. The V12-powered 275 GTB offered exotic styling and race-proven performance, and was an icon as much for its owners as it was for its historical significance and performance. Contemporary 275 GTB owners included Steve McQueen, James Coburn, Eric Clapton, Clint Eastwood and Miles Davis.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 275 GTB.

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1966 - 1967 Ferrari 275 Gran Turismo Berlinetta Competizione Scaglietti

1966 - 1967 Ferrari 275 Gran Turismo Berlinetta Competizione Scaglietti

It’s hard to fill a pair of shoes owned by the Ferrari 250, arguably the most iconic Ferrari in history. The Ferrari 275 was given that task, and for the most part, it had the kind of success as a road car and a race car that the 250 would be proud of. Produced from 1964 to 1968, the 275 GTB was the first iteration to be released. It was also the first Ferrari to feature a four wheel independent suspension and a five-speed transaxle that helped the car improve its weight distribution.

Italian design house Pininfarina is largely credited as the design driving force behind the Ferrari 275, even though rival Scaglietti is credited as the hands behind the construction of the legendary grand tourer. The 275 also benefited from a 3.3-liter V-12 engine that produced between 280 to 300 horsepower. While the engine went through numerous updates during its time, the 275 pretty much relied on this one block during its life.

The 275 also had different iterations, including the aforementioned 275 GTB, as well as the GTB/C, the GTS, and later on, the Scaglietti-penned GTB/4 that became the first Ferrari to be offered without wire wheels. The GTB/4 was also different because its 3.3-liter V-12 engine came with a four-cam engine instead of the two-cam configuration of its predecessors, hence the “4” identifier on the car’s name.

Separately, a Ferrari 275 GTB/4 NART Spyder was also produced, albeit in vastly limited quantities and exclusively to American dealer Luigi Chinetti. Only 10 units of the 275 GTB/4 NART were built and its limited number made this particular model one of the most valuable Ferraris in history.

In fact, a 275 GTB/4 NART (chassis #10709) was sold for $27.5 million at the RM Auctions in Monterey on August 2013, making it one of the most expensive production cars ever sold.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 Gran Turismo Berlinetta Competizione Scaglietti.

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

Introduced in 1953, the Ferrari 250 quickly became the company’s most successful vehicle lineup. It included everything from road-legal grand tourers to the 250 Testa Rossa and 250 LM race cars. More importantly, the range spawned the iconic 250 GTO, currently the most expensive Ferrari ever auctioned (as of August 20, 2014). The 250 line came to an end in 1964, when it was replaced by two distinct families, the 275 and 330. While the 275 GTB/C stepped in to substitute the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/4 took center stage as Ferrari’s new flagship model.

Introduced at the 1966 Paris Motor Show, the GTB/4 quickly became popular with sports car enthusiasts and celebrities, especially in the United States. Even Hollywood actor and motoring icon Steven McQueen ordered one of the V-12-powered grand tourers, receiving it on the set of the "Bullitt" movie. McQueens example became the most expensive GTB/4 ever auctioned in 2014, when it crossed the block for $10 million. Because of this huge auction sum, we decided to have a closer look at this enticing, berlinetta-bodied Ferrari.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

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1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti

In 1962, Ferrari made a huge leap forward by releasing the 250 GTO; a GT car produced for homologation into FIA’s Group 3 Grand Touring Car class. The 250 GTO went on to win the over 2.0-liter class of the International Championship for GT Manufacturers for three straight years from 1962 through 1964, becoming one of the last front-engined racers to remain competitive at the top level of sports car racing. As the two-seater berlinetta retired, Ferrari built the 275 GTB/C Speciale, a lighter sports car based on the already-iconic 250 GTO.

Designed by Sergio Scaglietti, the same man that penned the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/C got a 3.3-liter, V-12 engine under its hood, as opposed to the 3.0-liter plant fitted in its predecessor. Output was increased to 320 horsepower, which, coupled with the lowered weight, promised to deliver outstanding performance on the track. Unfortunately, Ferrari failed to homologate the 275 for the GT class, as the car submitted was considerably lighter than the dry weight stated for the road-going version.

Ferrari and FIA would reach a compromise by June 1965, enabling only one of the three 275 GTB/Cs built to compete for the remainder of the season. Although its career didn’t span for more than a few months, the Speciale proved its potency at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, where it finished third and scored the best finish by a front-engined car. Its record still stands to this day. Granted, the 275 GTB/C is not as successful as the 250 GTO or the 250 LM, however, its limited production run and bespoke character places it among the most desirable Ferrari race cars ever built.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti.

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

The record-shattering $27 million dollar auction price of the ultra-rare 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider is making waves through the entire classic car scene.

Never before has such a late-model Ferrari earned such totals - which are typically the preserve of the 250 series from pre-1964.

What makes this gorgeous Ferrari so much more valuable than the thousands of other classic Ferrari’s seeking new homes? How did the price of this single model nearly double the $14 million dollar average price - excluding this giant total - when any of these 10 cherished models have changed hands in the past?

Part of what makes this NART Spider so valuable is the car’s unique blend of the gorgeous late-1950s Ferrari styling and advanced mechancials. The GTB/4S upgrades dramatically increased the performance and handling of this V-12 supercar. Almost the entire Maranello racing technology suite was applied to the NART Spider - allowing it to be a posh cruiser that was also capable of serious speed on a racetrack.

The V-12’s quad overhead camshafts were a first on a road car, while the rear-mounted transaxle, limited-slip diff and independent rear suspension were all huge advancements that were offered first in the NART Spider.

Ferrari never looked back from all the new technology introduced on the NART Spider. At the same time, the NART is especially sentimental because Ferrari would not make make such an emotionally-styled road car again for decades. The 365 GTB/4 Daytona was 1967’s new hot style and Ferrari followed the money trail by ending 275 production.

Little did they know, the layers of exclusivity and special editions that helped create this this NART Spider would make it the most valuable road car ever sold. Ever.

Click past the jump for the full review of this timeless classic Ferrari, with details on the technology and style of this model during its 10-unit production run in 1967.

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta

The history of the Ferrari 275 began in 1964 when the model was initially brought onto the market. It came as a replacement for the legendary Dayton and only stayed in production for four years until 1968. Initially, the model was offered only in a two-cam version, but at the 1966 Paris Motor Show, Ferrari also unveiled the 275 GTB/4 - or the four-cam version.

The new 275 GTB/4 was designed by Pininfarina, built by Scaglietti, and was the first Ferrari not be offered with wire wheels. It immediately became a legend on the market, and even now, many people still claim it is one of the greatest Ferrari’s ever built. With that stellar history, it’s no surprise that one of the only 330 units built was sold at RM Auctions, Inc (Amelia) for an impressive $1.1 million.

Hit the jump to read more about the 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta.

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1966 - 1968 Ferrari 275 GTB4

1966 - 1968 Ferrari 275 GTB4

Revealed in 1966 at the Paris Motor Show the Ferrari 275 GTB4 is the last and the most desirable in the 275 series. The 275 GTB4 is also the first ’production’ Ferrari to be fitted with the four overhead camshaft version of the V12, and was derived directly from the P2 prototype. During 1966 and 1968 Ferrari produced around 330 units.

The difference between a standard 275 GTB and the GTB4 version was its "long nose" and also for the GTB4 version the bonnet had a slim shallow central bulge running from front to rear. Like all the other Ferrari, the 275 GTB4 was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, normally in steel with aluminum doors, bonnet, and boot lid, although a few examples received full aluminum bodies.

The bodies were mounted on a 2400mm wheelbase chassis that had factory reference numbers 596, and all were numbered in the odd chassis number road car sequence. The chassis was virtually identical to that of the two camshaft car, the revised number being due to minor differences in the drive train layout.

Continued after the jump.

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