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Would You Pay Six-Figures For A 1962 Ferrari 250 GTE With A Chevrolet LT1 Engine?

Would You Pay Six-Figures For A 1962 Ferrari 250 GTE With A Chevrolet LT1 Engine?

And many other changes to accommodate the new engine!

When launched back in 1962, the 250 GTE was powered by a 3.0-liter V-12 engine that delivered a total of 237 horsepower and 193 pound-feet of torque. At launch, the car was priced at $12,600, and right now, at auction, you can find them selling for as much as $400,000.

But what happens when you swap the V-12 engine, and go for a Chevrolet LT1 V-8 engine? A 250 GTE powered by a V-8 engine is now listed on Bring a Trailer and the current bid is $125,000 - that’s what.

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This One of 16 1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Pinin Farina Spider Has Already Attracted A Bid of $1 Million

This One of 16 1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Pinin Farina Spider Has Already Attracted A Bid of $1 Million

This rare Ferrari 500 Mondial has attracted a bid of $1 million and it could go higher from here

The Ferrari 500 Mondial was inspired by a design created by Dino Ferrari to freshen up the look of the old 166. The first three of the 500 Mondials were built by Scaglietti, a young coachbuilder from Modena. Later, Pinin Farina made 15 of these, although a Ferrari historian, Marcel Massini, notes that 16 were made. Either way, one of the Pinin Farina-built models has come up for sale on Bring-a-Trailer and it has already received a bid of $1 million!

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This Sweet-Looking 1990 Ferrari Testarossa Is Getting Auctioned For A Ridiculously Low-Price!

This Sweet-Looking 1990 Ferrari Testarossa Is Getting Auctioned For A Ridiculously Low-Price!

The 1990 Testarossa has less than 13,000 miles on the odo and looks as good as new

The Ferrari Testarossa needs no introduction. It is a classic Ferrari that commands attention even today. Ferrari built around 10,000 examples of the Testarossa in its 12-year life cycle that lasted from 1984 to 1996. If you are a fan of the car and have always wanted to own one, well, here’s your chance to do so.

A 1990 example has come up for sale on CollectingCars and it can be yours if you act fast. The highest bid for this Testarossa at the time of writing this article is $63,000.

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This Rare 550 Barchetta Is The Last Front-Engined V-12 Ferrari!

This Rare 550 Barchetta Is The Last Front-Engined V-12 Ferrari!

A rare 2001 Ferrari 550 Barchetta is looking for its new owner, and it’s a prime example of a car that could seriously increase in value.

It goes without saying that we are spoiled for choice when it comes to future classic cars. This is especially true nowadays when the main priorities in the automotive industry are cutting costs and producing more eco-friendly vehicles. Because of this, most modern cars will not appreciate nor become desirable collector’s items. Because of this cars like this rare Ferrari 550 Barchetta are bound to appreciate even more. Luckily, you can still pick them up relatively affordable (for a rare exotic car).

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Ferrari F40 - A Car With Heritage And a Few Secrets

Ferrari F40 - A Car With Heritage And a Few Secrets

The Ferrari F40 might have been an icon, but there was plenty to criticize

If you’ve landed here, and are somewhere between your late 20s and early 40s, then there’s a good chance that you or someone you know had a Ferrari F40 poster hanging on the bedroom wall. The F40 was introduced in 1987 and celebrated Ferrari’s 40th-anniversary while, at the same time, ultimately serving as the last vehicle to be launched by Mr. Enzo Ferrari himself. So, what made the Ferrari F40 so special? Well, there’s a lot more to it than you ever realized.

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1995 Ferrari F512 M

1995 Ferrari F512 M

The final hurrah of the Ferrari Testarossa

The Ferrari F512 M was the last evolution of the Testarossa, unarguably one of the legendary cars of the ‘80s. The F512 M was lighter than its predecessor, featured more modern styling, and boasted improved handling characteristics.

Everyone knows the Testarossa. With its red cam covers, its long “cheese graters” on the sides, and angular design, it’s a staple of its time and one of Ferrari’s modern icons. At the time, it was every bit as fast as a Countach, if not slightly faster. It handled slightly better and, more importantly, was a more relaxed tourer in that you could actually drive the Testarossa for 500 miles at a time and not drop dead from back pain afterward.

The F512 TR continued the trend and refined the recipe, but the ultimate expression of this body shape came in 1994 and was christened F512 M, where M stands for “Modificato.” Indeed, there were many modifications done to the F512 M even in comparison to the F512 TR, but the same spirit was still there. It was to be the rarest of all the Testarossas since only 501 were built through 1996 when Ferrari rolled out the front-engined grand tourer called 550 Maranello.

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This 2006 Ferrari F430 Is the Queen of Naturally Aspirated Thrills

This 2006 Ferrari F430 Is the Queen of Naturally Aspirated Thrills

The F430 is a special model that ticked a lot of firsts for Ferrari moving forward

The Ferrari F430 was unveiled at the 2004 Paris Motor Show as a successor to the Ferrari 360. It came with a whole lot of changes compared to its predecessor, especially in the aerodynamic efficiency department. The F430 now generated a greater downforce, thus instilling more confidence at higher speeds. The supercar was in production for about five years from 2004 to 2009 wherein Ferrari make around 15,000 examples of it. Not exactly a rare breed, but the F430 came with a naturally aspirated V-8 and a lot of heritage-inspired elements that make it a looker even to this day.

A 2006 example finished in the Rosso Corsa red shade with 20,000 miles on the odo has revisited the Bring-a-Trailer auction and here’s your chance to grab the beauty.

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This 1978 Ferrari 512 BB "Koenig Special" is Extra Special

This 1978 Ferrari 512 BB "Koenig Special" is Extra Special

This Ferrari 512 BB "Koenig Special" is your chance to own a 1980s poster car

The 1980s were all about excess. This extended to cars, as well. It’s no surprise, cars like the Ferrari 512 Berlinetta Boxer (BB) were conceived. Back then, cars like these were the ultimate expression of wealth and power. But what happens when a Ferrari 512 BB doesn’t look flashy enough? You modify it, of course! This was the exact fate of this 1972 Ferrari 512 BB “Koenig Special”. The car is currently being auctioned off on collectingcars.com.

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This Spa-Winning Ferrari 550 GT1 Is The Most Expensive Car Sold At An Online Auction Ever

This Spa-Winning Ferrari 550 GT1 Is The Most Expensive Car Sold At An Online Auction Ever

The RM/Sotheby’s Shift/Monterey sale remained within the bounds of the virtual world but the eye-watering price of this Ferrari is very real

Pedigree is what sells a racing car and this Ferrari 550 GT1 from the noughties is bathing in pedigree as the last V-12-engined Ferrari to win a high-profile 24-hour race and one of only 12 of its kind to be built by Prodrive in the UK.

No wonder, then, that this car became the most expensive car ever to be sold at an online-only auction after going for just under $4.3 million during the Shift/Monterey RM/Sotheby’s auction that replaced the auction house’s now traditional Monterey Car Week auction.

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Car for Sale: Ultra-Rare 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta Prototipo

Car for Sale: Ultra-Rare 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta Prototipo

This was the car tasked with showing the world just how great the Ferrari F50 really was

It’s a very rare occasion when something as special as this 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta Prototipo shows up with a for sale sign that’s open to the public. The F50 Berlinetta, in general, is special in its own right as Ferrari produced less than 350 examples over the course of its life, but this is, arguably, the most special of all. Keep reading to find out why.

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1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

Maybe the most beautiful open-top car that money can buy

The entire Ferrari 250 line seems to have secured its place in the palace of automotive royalties for generations to come. With unmistakable lines, a variety of powerful but also reliable Colombo V-12s, and limited-run production, almost all of the late-50s to early-60s Ferrari 250 models command astronomical values at auction nowadays.

There are, of course, some stars that shine brighter than others, such as the 250 GTO, the 250 GT SWB, and, lastly, the 250 California SWB Spider built between 1960 and 1962. This is one of those short-wheelbase California Spiders but, despite its originality, it lacks the aura of the ex-Alain Delon ’barn find’ that sold for $18.5 million four years ago.

Besides the fact that Alain Delon once owned and thrashed that particular 250 California SWB Spider, what made it even more desirable were its covered headlights. Amazingly, the more sought after variant is, actually, the one Ferrari made more of: a total of 37,250 California SWB Spiders left the factory with covered headlights and just 19 were optioned without the glass over the twin circular headlamps. Read on to learn more about the strange case of a buyer-induced trend that goes against the otherwise untouchable principle of rarity.

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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

The mid-’60s Ferrari that dreams are made of

The Ferrari 275 GTB is widely considered to be one of the prettiest grand touring cars built during the sizzling ’60s. Displaying an evolutionary design language influenced by Ferrari’s glorious 250-series models such as the 250 GTO and the 250 GTE 2+2, the 275 GTB came in both short-nose and long-nose specification, with the 3.3-liter Colombo V-12 first featuring two overhead camshafts before Ferrari introduced, in 1967, the 275 GTB/4 with four overhead camshafts. This here is a Series II 275 GTB or, in other words, a long-nosed version built towards the end of the GTB’s production run in 1966. It’s one of the last of just a few dozen 275 GTBs with an all-aluminum body shell that makes the car both lighter and rust-proof. Too bad it’s as expensive as a handful of Ferrari F40s.

Even fans of modern supercars and wedge-shaped obscurities from the ’80s would oftentimes come together and agree that the GTs made in the ’60s are a sight to behold: elongated noses, low rooflines, and a tail that usually ends with a stubby Kammback. It’s a well-known recipe and few applied it better than Ferrari. Designed by the house of Pininfarina, by now an integral part of the Maranello-based manufacturer, the 275 GTB came to sweepingly replace all of the 250-series models. It was designed to be more user-friendly, more practical, but without giving up on performance or the unique feeling of being behind the wheel of a Ferrari. Included by many publications on shortlists of the prettiest Ferraris of all time, the 275 GTB was also a successful race car and it also spawned an open-top version in the N.A.R.T.-commissioned 275 GTS/4 Spyders built between 1967 and 1968 (the 275 GTS featured a completely different Pininfarina body while the N.A.R.T. cars featured Scaglietti bodies in the style of Pininfarina’s Berlinetta design).

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1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

The shark-nosed sports prototype from Maranello

The Drake, a man who honed his craft as the team boss of Alfa Corse in the ’30s, carried some of the old adages over when he started his own automotive company. It’s no wonder, then, that he was reluctant to jump on the rear-mid engine train when it boomed two decades after the last pre-war Grand Prix but when his Prancing Horses finally rolled out with the engine aft of the driver they proved overwhelmingly good: in F1, the 156 steamrolled its way to both the Constructor’s and the Driver’s F1 title in 1961 and, in long-distance racing, the 196 SP, as a direct descendant of the 246 SP, foresaw what was to come in sports car racing.

The 196 SP is an incredibly rare and incredibly gorgeous beast. With a low-slung body and a nose very similar to that of the 156 F1 car, it carried what was good about the 246 SP, the first Ferrari mid-engined sports car that was unveiled in 1961, and improved on the formula. Under the rear deck, there was, effectively, half of a Colombo V-12, and not the Dino V-6 although the 196 SP has been referred to as the Dino 196 SP in some circles. Five were built for 1962 and this one, chassis #0806 is the only that has survived. RM/Sotheby’s tried selling it during the Monterey Car Week but failed. Still, the car is valued at anywhere between $8 million and $10 million. Keep reading to find out why this V-6-engined Ferrari is worth more than twice the price of a LaFerrari, Maranello’s V-12 hybrid wonder.

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