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This Spa-Winning Ferrari 550 GT1 Is The Most Expensive Car Sold At An Online Auction Ever

This Spa-Winning Ferrari 550 GT1 Is The Most Expensive Car Sold At An Online Auction Ever

The RM/Sotheby’s Shift/Monterey sale remained within the bounds of the virtual world but the eye-watering price of this Ferrari is very real

Pedigree is what sells a racing car and this Ferrari 550 GT1 from the noughties is bathing in pedigree as the last V-12-engined Ferrari to win a high-profile 24-hour race and one of only 12 of its kind to be built by Prodrive in the UK.

No wonder, then, that this car became the most expensive car ever to be sold at an online-only auction after going for just under $4.3 million during the Shift/Monterey RM/Sotheby’s auction that replaced the auction house’s now traditional Monterey Car Week auction.

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Car for Sale: Ultra-Rare 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta Prototipo

Car for Sale: Ultra-Rare 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta Prototipo

This was the car tasked with showing the world just how great the Ferrari F50 really was

It’s a very rare occasion when something as special as this 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta Prototipo shows up with a for sale sign that’s open to the public. The F50 Berlinetta, in general, is special in its own right as Ferrari produced less than 350 examples over the course of its life, but this is, arguably, the most special of all. Keep reading to find out why.

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1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

Maybe the most beautiful open-top car that money can buy

The entire Ferrari 250 line seems to have secured its place in the palace of automotive royalties for generations to come. With unmistakable lines, a variety of powerful but also reliable Colombo V-12s, and limited-run production, almost all of the late-50s to early-60s Ferrari 250 models command astronomical values at auction nowadays.

There are, of course, some stars that shine brighter than others, such as the 250 GTO, the 250 GT SWB, and, lastly, the 250 California SWB Spider built between 1960 and 1962. This is one of those short-wheelbase California Spiders but, despite its originality, it lacks the aura of the ex-Alain Delon ’barn find’ that sold for $18.5 million four years ago.

Besides the fact that Alain Delon once owned and thrashed that particular 250 California SWB Spider, what made it even more desirable were its covered headlights. Amazingly, the more sought after variant is, actually, the one Ferrari made more of: a total of 37,250 California SWB Spiders left the factory with covered headlights and just 19 were optioned without the glass over the twin circular headlamps. Read on to learn more about the strange case of a buyer-induced trend that goes against the otherwise untouchable principle of rarity.

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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

The mid-’60s Ferrari that dreams are made of

The Ferrari 275 GTB is widely considered to be one of the prettiest grand touring cars built during the sizzling ’60s. Displaying an evolutionary design language influenced by Ferrari’s glorious 250-series models such as the 250 GTO and the 250 GTE 2+2, the 275 GTB came in both short-nose and long-nose specification, with the 3.3-liter Colombo V-12 first featuring two overhead camshafts before Ferrari introduced, in 1967, the 275 GTB/4 with four overhead camshafts. This here is a Series II 275 GTB or, in other words, a long-nosed version built towards the end of the GTB’s production run in 1966. It’s one of the last of just a few dozen 275 GTBs with an all-aluminum body shell that makes the car both lighter and rust-proof. Too bad it’s as expensive as a handful of Ferrari F40s.

Even fans of modern supercars and wedge-shaped obscurities from the ’80s would oftentimes come together and agree that the GTs made in the ’60s are a sight to behold: elongated noses, low rooflines, and a tail that usually ends with a stubby Kammback. It’s a well-known recipe and few applied it better than Ferrari. Designed by the house of Pininfarina, by now an integral part of the Maranello-based manufacturer, the 275 GTB came to sweepingly replace all of the 250-series models. It was designed to be more user-friendly, more practical, but without giving up on performance or the unique feeling of being behind the wheel of a Ferrari. Included by many publications on shortlists of the prettiest Ferraris of all time, the 275 GTB was also a successful race car and it also spawned an open-top version in the N.A.R.T.-commissioned 275 GTS/4 Spyders built between 1967 and 1968 (the 275 GTS featured a completely different Pininfarina body while the N.A.R.T. cars featured Scaglietti bodies in the style of Pininfarina’s Berlinetta design).

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1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

The shark-nosed sports prototype from Maranello

The Drake, a man who honed his craft as the team boss of Alfa Corse in the ’30s, carried some of the old adages over when he started his own automotive company. It’s no wonder, then, that he was reluctant to jump on the rear-mid engine train when it boomed two decades after the last pre-war Grand Prix but when his Prancing Horses finally rolled out with the engine aft of the driver they proved overwhelmingly good: in F1, the 156 steamrolled its way to both the Constructor’s and the Driver’s F1 title in 1961 and, in long-distance racing, the 196 SP, as a direct descendant of the 246 SP, foresaw what was to come in sports car racing.

The 196 SP is an incredibly rare and incredibly gorgeous beast. With a low-slung body and a nose very similar to that of the 156 F1 car, it carried what was good about the 246 SP, the first Ferrari mid-engined sports car that was unveiled in 1961, and improved on the formula. Under the rear deck, there was, effectively, half of a Colombo V-12, and not the Dino V-6 although the 196 SP has been referred to as the Dino 196 SP in some circles. Five were built for 1962 and this one, chassis #0806 is the only that has survived. RM/Sotheby’s tried selling it during the Monterey Car Week but failed. Still, the car is valued at anywhere between $8 million and $10 million. Keep reading to find out why this V-6-engined Ferrari is worth more than twice the price of a LaFerrari, Maranello’s V-12 hybrid wonder.

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1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

A one-off coupé based on the Ferrari 375 MM race car

The 1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale is a one-off version of the iconic 375 MM bodied by Italian coach builder Ghia. The Ferrari 375 MM was built from 1953 until 1955. It was developed as a race car, but some were converted to road use. One of only nine road-going coupés built on the 375 MM chassis, the Coupé Speciale is also the only 375 design by Ghia and the last Ferrari built by the company. The car was showcased at the 1955 Torino Motor Show and was then shipped to Robert Wilke, owner of the Leader Card Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

A racing fan, Wilke, who sponsored an IndyCar team from the 1930s until his death in 1970, was also a personal friend of Enzo Ferrari. The 375 MM Coupé Speciale was one of seven unique vehicles that Ferrari built for the businessman, but it’s the most historically significant vehicle owned by him. Also one of the most documented Ferraris in existence, the Coupé Speciale changed hands several times since the 1970s. Come 2019 and it’s going under the hammer to find a new owner at RM Sotheby’s car sale in Monterey on August 15-17.

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Car for Sale: Ultra Rare 2006 Ferrari FXX

Car for Sale: Ultra Rare 2006 Ferrari FXX

There Are Only 30 Ferrari FXX Units in the World and One of Them Can Be Yours

The 2006 Ferrari FXX is not only one of the rarest Ferraris in the world, but it’s also one of the most difficult ones to own. Only 30 units were built, and even if you had the money to buy one then, you could only do so if you get an invitation from Ferrari to buy it. It’s safe to say, then, that if a Ferrari FXX did go on sale, you’re going to have quite the bidding war for the prized track-only, hardcore version of the Enzo. Well, buckle up, because that bidding war could occur at the RM Sotheby’s auction in Monterey, California this coming August. The auction will host the “Ming Collection,” a collection of seven near-flawless Ferraris that includes a rarely used Ferrari FXX. This isn’t a drill, folks. A close-to-mint 2006 Ferrari FXX is going up for auction at RM Sotheby’s in August. The doody, as they say, is about to hit the fan.

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Car for Sale: Unique 2011 Ferrari SP30 One-Off by Ferrari Special Projects

Car for Sale: Unique 2011 Ferrari SP30 One-Off by Ferrari Special Projects

RM/Sotheby’s says it’s the first Ferrari Special Projects model offered publicly for sale

As you know, Ferrari will build you a unique model based on one of the cars they’re currently making if you’re wealthy enough to pay for the bill. Such a car is this, the SP30, which started life as a 599 GTO and went through a dramatic makeover receiving 458-style headlights and taillights that are identical to those on a 599 GTB.

Ever since Jim Glickenhaus and a few other Ferrari aficionados bathed into the limelight with their one-off Ferraris, the Maranello-based manufacturer realized there’s a market for ludicrous personalized cars made-to-order by very rich customers. Thus, Ferrari created the ’Special Projects’ program that helps long-standing Ferrari collectors that aren’t interested in buying just any boring model that rolls off of the production line to bring their vision to reality.

The SP30 was born back in 2012 and has since only traveled 65 miles according to the odometer. It’s so pristine that it even has the plastic wrap on the infotainment screen. RM/Sotheby’s wants you to send an inquiry if you’re interested in the price estimate, so we had to dig a bit to find the estimate and, in the end, just as expected, the auction house looks to get big bucks on the SP30: between $4.5 million and $5.7 million, to be precise.

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Ferrari 275 GTB Prototype with Monte-Carlo Rally In Its Resume To Head For Auction

Ferrari 275 GTB Prototype with Monte-Carlo Rally In Its Resume To Head For Auction

It’s the only prototype ever built and it participated in the 1966 edition of the event

Over 50 years ago, Giorgio Pianta took on the grueling Monte-Carlo Rally not in a Mini, nor in a Citroen, not even in a Ford, but in a gorgeous, yellow Ferrari 275 GTB, with Maranello’s blessing. The car, looking the same as it did back in 1966 heads to the Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale auction that’s taking place between January 18th and 19th.

The 275 GTB was introduced in 1964 as a replacement to the aging 250 series. It was the first Ferrari to have a transaxle although the engine was still the venerable Colombo-designed 60-degree V-12. This particular example is one that has been used extensively for both show and go: it was showcased at motor shows, it was used as a mobile testbed, and it raced. Now, restored from end to end, it should fetch in excess of $8 million at auction, a price that’s not unheard of for a 275 GTB, especially since this one has a unique backstory and we all know that, many a time, the backstory is what sells a classic car.

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This Blue F40 LM Is The Best Belated Christmas Gift Money Can Buy

This Blue F40 LM Is The Best Belated Christmas Gift Money Can Buy

As one of only 19 F40 LMs ever built, it is expected to fetch a few millions at auction

By the time its production cycle had ended, in 1992, the F40 was officially the most successful car ever built by Ferrari with over 1,300 units sold in its five-year lifespan. It’s now an icon of the Prancing Horse and, while prices tip over $1 million, you can still find one quite easily, although U.S. spec examples are rarer. Still, the street-going F40 has nothing on one of these: the ultra-rare, ultra-insane, F40 LM that was built for that famous old race in France.

Ferrari released the outrageously under-equipped F40 in 1987 to mark the company’s 40th anniversary. It was the fastest road-going car at the moment of its debut with a top speed of 201 mph, breaking that much-lamented 200 mph mark, and the last Ferrari to be given the blessing ’The Drake’ himself.

With such extreme specs, it wasn’t long before the F40 would hit the track, although Ferrari didn’t originally intend for it to happen. It first raced Stateside in the IMSA GT series before also competing in the Italian GT Championship and, more prominently, in the BPR Global GT Series of the mid-’90s, by which time the production version was relaxing in retirement for a few years already.

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1995 Ferrari F512 M

1995 Ferrari F512 M

The final hurrah of the Ferrari Testarossa

The Ferrari F512 M was the last evolution of the Testarossa, unarguably one of the legendary cars of the ‘80s. The F512 M was lighter than its predecessor, featured more modern styling, and boasted improved handling characteristics.

Everyone knows the Testarossa. With its red cam covers, its long “cheese graters” on the sides, and angular design, it’s a staple of its time and one of Ferrari’s modern icons. At the time, it was every bit as fast as a Countach, if not slightly faster. It handled slightly better and, more importantly, was a more relaxed tourer in that you could actually drive the Testarossa for 500 miles at a time and not drop dead from back pain afterward.

The F512 TR continued the trend and refined the recipe, but the ultimate expression of this body shape came in 1994 and was christened F512 M, where M stands for “Modificato.” Indeed, there were many modifications done to the F512 M even in comparison to the F512 TR, but the same spirit was still there. It was to be the rarest of all the Testarossas since only 501 were built through 1996 when Ferrari rolled out the front-engined grand tourer called 550 Maranello.

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1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

A classic open-top Prancing Horse, ready for export

The Ferrari 340 America was the first model in the America series conceived with export in mind, used as a means to increase Ferrari’s footprint in the United States. The 340 featured a brand-new Lampredi V-12 which made its way to Formula 1, with this particular car racing at Le Mans twice in the early ’50s.

The Ferrari America series was launched at the dawn of the ’50s to appeal to American customers who wanted less rugged interior premises, bigger engines, and more performance. The first car of this lineage was the 340 America, which debuted at the 1950 Paris Motor Show in full racing trim. Granted, most Ferraris back then were as much race cars as they were road cars, but a customer could personalize his car to be more friendly on the road with softer suspension, different gearbox ratios, or new engine settings.

As this is a Ferrari from the early days of the company, it was made in very few numbers, on order from importers or customers. Barely 23 cars were completed between 1950 and 1952, with three coachbuilders taking care of the body. Carrozzeria Touring built six Barchetta and two Berlinetta bodies, Vignale crafted five Spyder bodies, five Berlinetta bodies, and one larger Convertible, while Ghia built only four fixed-head Coupes.

The car seen here is chassis #0116/A, the third 340 America built, and one of the 6 Barchettas by Touring. It ran briefly in period, its highlights being a couple of entries in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Owner Pierre-Louis Dreyfus shared the car in 1951 with well-known Grand Prix driver Louis Chiron and, in 1952, Rene Dreyfus. While the car didn’t reach the finish line on either occasion, it went on to sell for $8,430,000 during the 2016 RM Sotheby’s auction in Monaco.

Read on to understand why the 340 America commands such high prices.

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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Becomes The Most Expensive Car Ever Sold in an Auction

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Becomes The Most Expensive Car Ever Sold in an Auction

Prices of Ferrari 250 GTOs are going through the roof!

As expected, the 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO that was tipped to sell for $45 million at the RM Sotheby’s auction over the weekend beat its own expectation, selling for a record $48.4 million at the auction’s sale in Monterey, California. The sale not only beat the previous auction record for a Ferrari 250 GTO — another model sold for $38.115 million in 2013 — it also became the most expensive car ever sold at an auction.

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1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2

1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2

If only James Bond was Italian...

The 330 GT 2+2 was actually an update to the 330 America that Ferrari built in 1963 only. It also replaced the 250 GT/E 2+2, but it was larger and sportier. Introduced in 1964, the 330 GT 2+2 was upgraded in 1965, when the Series II model with a new design was launched. Production lasted until 1967, with 1,099 examples built until the Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 was introduced as a replacement. The cool thing about these cars is that they’ve remained somewhat affordable compared to other million-dollar Ferraris from the era.

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1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast by Pininfarina

1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast by Pininfarina

Maranello’s flagship GT in the 1960s

One of the most iconic Ferrari nameplates, the America is also one of the longest standing badges from Maranello, being offered in various cars from 1951 through 1967. However, none of the Americas stand out as the top-of-the-line 500 Superfast model, which was built between 1964 and 1966 in only 37 units. As rare as they get, the Superfast is next to impossible to buy, but one example is going up for auction in Monterey this month.

Bearing chassis no. 8459SF, this specific car was the 33rd Superfast built and the eighth of 12 Series II models. It was also the seventh of only eight Superfasts built with right-hand drive. It was delivered in 1966 to British sportsman Jack Durlacher and was sold in 1976. Restored in 1981, it remained with the Manoukian Brothers for 15 years until 2007, when it was sold to the current owner. While not in mint condition, with minor dents and sign of use inside and out, the 500 Superfast has held up well, and it’s still fitted with the original engine. Let’s find out more about this fantastic grand tourer in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 500 Superfast Series II by Pininfarina

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Amazing 1966 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta Prototype Heading to Pebble Beach Auction

Amazing 1966 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta Prototype Heading to Pebble Beach Auction

Ferrari collectors better need to have their checkbooks ready

Look at the list of the most expensive cars ever sold at an auction and at least three-fourths of the cars on that list are Ferraris. That’s important to know because another classic Ferrari is about to join its peers on that list. A 1966 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta GT is headed to the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it will be auctioned off by Gooding and Company on August 24. The classic Ferrari is estimated to fetch between $2 million to $3 million, though given how much other classic Ferraris have gone for in recent auctions, that estimate could turn out to be conservative relative to our expectations.

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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Estimated At $45 Million will be Auctioned in August

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Estimated At $45 Million will be Auctioned in August

Better get those checkbooks ready, folks! This Ferrari 250 GTO is going to fetch a huge price!

A few weeks after a Ferrari 250 GTO sold for a record-breaking $70 million, another example of the world’s most sought-after car is going to be put up for auction at the RM Sotheby’s auction in Monterey, California on August 24. The specific 250 GTO in question is estimated to fetch $45 million at the auction. It’s also just the third time a Ferrari 250 GTO is going to be offered for public sale since the calendar flipped to 2000. As much as must-have cars are concerned, there’s no denying which car sits as the unquestioned king of that list. It’s the Ferrari 250 GTO, and you can get your hands on one this August provided that you can afford it.

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The Founder of WeatherTech Just Paid $70 Million For a Ferrari 250 GTO

The Founder of WeatherTech Just Paid $70 Million For a Ferrari 250 GTO

It’s now the most expensive car in the world

David McNeal, the founder of WeatherTech, just paid a record-breaking $70 million for a 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO that is so pristine it’s regarded as the third or fourth best example in the world by well-known Ferrari historian, Marcel Massini.

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