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Car for Sale: Ultra-Rare 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta Prototipo

Car for Sale: Ultra-Rare 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta Prototipo

This was the car tasked with showing the world just how great the Ferrari F50 really was

It’s a very rare occasion when something as special as this 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta Prototipo shows up with a for sale sign that’s open to the public. The F50 Berlinetta, in general, is special in its own right as Ferrari produced less than 350 examples over the course of its life, but this is, arguably, the most special of all. Keep reading to find out why.

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Buyer of $44 Million Ferrari 250 GTO Goes to Court Over Disputed OG Transmission

Buyer of $44 Million Ferrari 250 GTO Goes to Court Over Disputed OG Transmission

It sounds silly until you realize just how much money is actually involved

One of the most expensive cars ever sold is now at the center of a lawsuit, all because of a missing part. The car in question is a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO, which sold for $44 million in 2017 after British classic car trader Gregor Fisken purchased it from American collector and lawyer Bernard Carl.

A transaction of that amount should’ve made Fisken and Carl friends for life, but the opposite has happened as the two heavyweight collectors are now entangled in a lawsuit involving the 250 GTO’s original five-speed manual transmission, which didn’t come with the car when Fisken purchased it from Carl. It remains unclear if Fisken is owed the original five-speed transmission, but the lawsuit has already been heard by the U.K. High Court. The judge presiding over the lawsuit is reportedly days away from making a verdict.

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1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

Maybe the most beautiful open-top car that money can buy

The entire Ferrari 250 line seems to have secured its place in the palace of automotive royalties for generations to come. With unmistakable lines, a variety of powerful but also reliable Colombo V-12s, and limited-run production, almost all of the late-50s to early-60s Ferrari 250 models command astronomical values at auction nowadays.

There are, of course, some stars that shine brighter than others, such as the 250 GTO, the 250 GT SWB, and, lastly, the 250 California SWB Spider built between 1960 and 1962. This is one of those short-wheelbase California Spiders but, despite its originality, it lacks the aura of the ex-Alain Delon ’barn find’ that sold for $18.5 million four years ago.

Besides the fact that Alain Delon once owned and thrashed that particular 250 California SWB Spider, what made it even more desirable were its covered headlights. Amazingly, the more sought after variant is, actually, the one Ferrari made more of: a total of 37,250 California SWB Spiders left the factory with covered headlights and just 19 were optioned without the glass over the twin circular headlamps. Read on to learn more about the strange case of a buyer-induced trend that goes against the otherwise untouchable principle of rarity.

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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

The mid-’60s Ferrari that dreams are made of

The Ferrari 275 GTB is widely considered to be one of the prettiest grand touring cars built during the sizzling ’60s. Displaying an evolutionary design language influenced by Ferrari’s glorious 250-series models such as the 250 GTO and the 250 GTE 2+2, the 275 GTB came in both short-nose and long-nose specification, with the 3.3-liter Colombo V-12 first featuring two overhead camshafts before Ferrari introduced, in 1967, the 275 GTB/4 with four overhead camshafts. This here is a Series II 275 GTB or, in other words, a long-nosed version built towards the end of the GTB’s production run in 1966. It’s one of the last of just a few dozen 275 GTBs with an all-aluminum body shell that makes the car both lighter and rust-proof. Too bad it’s as expensive as a handful of Ferrari F40s.

Even fans of modern supercars and wedge-shaped obscurities from the ’80s would oftentimes come together and agree that the GTs made in the ’60s are a sight to behold: elongated noses, low rooflines, and a tail that usually ends with a stubby Kammback. It’s a well-known recipe and few applied it better than Ferrari. Designed by the house of Pininfarina, by now an integral part of the Maranello-based manufacturer, the 275 GTB came to sweepingly replace all of the 250-series models. It was designed to be more user-friendly, more practical, but without giving up on performance or the unique feeling of being behind the wheel of a Ferrari. Included by many publications on shortlists of the prettiest Ferraris of all time, the 275 GTB was also a successful race car and it also spawned an open-top version in the N.A.R.T.-commissioned 275 GTS/4 Spyders built between 1967 and 1968 (the 275 GTS featured a completely different Pininfarina body while the N.A.R.T. cars featured Scaglietti bodies in the style of Pininfarina’s Berlinetta design).

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1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

The shark-nosed sports prototype from Maranello

The Drake, a man who honed his craft as the team boss of Alfa Corse in the ’30s, carried some of the old adages over when he started his own automotive company. It’s no wonder, then, that he was reluctant to jump on the rear-mid engine train when it boomed two decades after the last pre-war Grand Prix but when his Prancing Horses finally rolled out with the engine aft of the driver they proved overwhelmingly good: in F1, the 156 steamrolled its way to both the Constructor’s and the Driver’s F1 title in 1961 and, in long-distance racing, the 196 SP, as a direct descendant of the 246 SP, foresaw what was to come in sports car racing.

The 196 SP is an incredibly rare and incredibly gorgeous beast. With a low-slung body and a nose very similar to that of the 156 F1 car, it carried what was good about the 246 SP, the first Ferrari mid-engined sports car that was unveiled in 1961, and improved on the formula. Under the rear deck, there was, effectively, half of a Colombo V-12, and not the Dino V-6 although the 196 SP has been referred to as the Dino 196 SP in some circles. Five were built for 1962 and this one, chassis #0806 is the only that has survived. RM/Sotheby’s tried selling it during the Monterey Car Week but failed. Still, the car is valued at anywhere between $8 million and $10 million. Keep reading to find out why this V-6-engined Ferrari is worth more than twice the price of a LaFerrari, Maranello’s V-12 hybrid wonder.

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1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

A one-off coupé based on the Ferrari 375 MM race car

The 1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale is a one-off version of the iconic 375 MM bodied by Italian coach builder Ghia. The Ferrari 375 MM was built from 1953 until 1955. It was developed as a race car, but some were converted to road use. One of only nine road-going coupés built on the 375 MM chassis, the Coupé Speciale is also the only 375 design by Ghia and the last Ferrari built by the company. The car was showcased at the 1955 Torino Motor Show and was then shipped to Robert Wilke, owner of the Leader Card Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

A racing fan, Wilke, who sponsored an IndyCar team from the 1930s until his death in 1970, was also a personal friend of Enzo Ferrari. The 375 MM Coupé Speciale was one of seven unique vehicles that Ferrari built for the businessman, but it’s the most historically significant vehicle owned by him. Also one of the most documented Ferraris in existence, the Coupé Speciale changed hands several times since the 1970s. Come 2019 and it’s going under the hammer to find a new owner at RM Sotheby’s car sale in Monterey on August 15-17.

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1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

A classic open-top Prancing Horse, ready for export

The Ferrari 340 America was the first model in the America series conceived with export in mind, used as a means to increase Ferrari’s footprint in the United States. The 340 featured a brand-new Lampredi V-12 which made its way to Formula 1, with this particular car racing at Le Mans twice in the early ’50s.

The Ferrari America series was launched at the dawn of the ’50s to appeal to American customers who wanted less rugged interior premises, bigger engines, and more performance. The first car of this lineage was the 340 America, which debuted at the 1950 Paris Motor Show in full racing trim. Granted, most Ferraris back then were as much race cars as they were road cars, but a customer could personalize his car to be more friendly on the road with softer suspension, different gearbox ratios, or new engine settings.

As this is a Ferrari from the early days of the company, it was made in very few numbers, on order from importers or customers. Barely 23 cars were completed between 1950 and 1952, with three coachbuilders taking care of the body. Carrozzeria Touring built six Barchetta and two Berlinetta bodies, Vignale crafted five Spyder bodies, five Berlinetta bodies, and one larger Convertible, while Ghia built only four fixed-head Coupes.

The car seen here is chassis #0116/A, the third 340 America built, and one of the 6 Barchettas by Touring. It ran briefly in period, its highlights being a couple of entries in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Owner Pierre-Louis Dreyfus shared the car in 1951 with well-known Grand Prix driver Louis Chiron and, in 1952, Rene Dreyfus. While the car didn’t reach the finish line on either occasion, it went on to sell for $8,430,000 during the 2016 RM Sotheby’s auction in Monaco.

Read on to understand why the 340 America commands such high prices.

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1965 Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake

1965 Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake

The Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake by Vignale is as radical a departure from the production 330 GT 2+2 as one can imagine. It is a two-door station wagon Prancing Horse from the ‘60s that can sit four and reach 150 mph. You will not see another one like it, ever.

The ‘60s were an era when coachbuilding was still happening and it’s when many designers took it upon themselves to create unique reinterpretations of already outlandish sports cars. Such an outlandish reinterpretation was the Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake. It was based off of Ferrari’s then-new 330 GT 2+2, the Italian automaker’s fledging long-distance Grand Tourer that replaced the 250 GTE 2+2 and the 330 America in the lineup.

The bodywork you se now on the car, though, has nothing to do with the Tom Tjaarda-penned original coachwork. The shooting brake design was a joint effort between Luigi Chinetti, Jr. who acquired the car for this project and Bob Peak, the man commonly cited as being behind the way movie posters look nowadays.

Mechanically, chassis #09763 is broadly identical to any other 330 GT, but the clothes it wears are what sets it apart. The Vignale-built body, which has almost none of the components from the donor, is an acquired taste, which may be why the car’s been struggling to find a buyer for a few years now. It was once part of Jay Kay’s collection of Ferrari but has since seen the premises of many auction houses and dealers and is currently up for grabs again at The Petersen Automotive Museum auction on December 8th.

The asking price for what is, by all accounts, the last Ferrari to be bodied by Vignale – and one of the wackiest of the lot – is that of two Ferrari 488s full spec’ed out. Is it worth it? Read on to find out!

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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Becomes The Most Expensive Car Ever Sold in an Auction

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Becomes The Most Expensive Car Ever Sold in an Auction

Prices of Ferrari 250 GTOs are going through the roof!

As expected, the 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO that was tipped to sell for $45 million at the RM Sotheby’s auction over the weekend beat its own expectation, selling for a record $48.4 million at the auction’s sale in Monterey, California. The sale not only beat the previous auction record for a Ferrari 250 GTO — another model sold for $38.115 million in 2013 — it also became the most expensive car ever sold at an auction.

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1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

Maranello’s answer to the Porsche 911

In 1968, Ferrari had been on the market as a road car manufacturer for 21 years and was already enjoying massive success. It had already won the Formula One championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans and launched iconic cars like the 250 GTO, 275 GTB, and the 400 Superamerica. However, the cars were very expensive, and Ferrari was looking for a shot at the more affordable sports car market. And it created the Dino for this exact purpose.

Launched in 1968, the first Dino was called the 206 GT. Powered by a 2.0-liter V-6, it was designed by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti and produced until 1969. The Dino was updated in 1969 and renamed the 246 GT. A convertible model called the GTS was also introduced. The original Dino was phased out in 1974, but a redesigned model called the 308 GT4 was launched in 1973 and kept into production until 1980. That’s when the Dino brand was dropped altogether, and Ferrari’s next affordable sports car was called the Mondial.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Dino 206 GT.

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1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE)

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE)

A genuine four-seater sports car

While the Prancing Horse is best known for its top-shelf performance vehicles and winning racing machines, even Maranello’s finest must occasionally bend to the whims of the passenger vehicle market. But don’t see it as a compromise - rather, it’s best seen as a combination of speed and usability, catapulting the commonplace people mover to the extraordinary realm of apexes and checkered flags. Such is the case with the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2, the brand’s first genuine four-seater model.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE).

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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Estimated At $45 Million will be Auctioned in August

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Estimated At $45 Million will be Auctioned in August

Better get those checkbooks ready, folks! This Ferrari 250 GTO is going to fetch a huge price!

A few weeks after a Ferrari 250 GTO sold for a record-breaking $70 million, another example of the world’s most sought-after car is going to be put up for auction at the RM Sotheby’s auction in Monterey, California on August 24. The specific 250 GTO in question is estimated to fetch $45 million at the auction. It’s also just the third time a Ferrari 250 GTO is going to be offered for public sale since the calendar flipped to 2000. As much as must-have cars are concerned, there’s no denying which car sits as the unquestioned king of that list. It’s the Ferrari 250 GTO, and you can get your hands on one this August provided that you can afford it.

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1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 “Daytona”

1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 “Daytona”

A Prancing Horse hungry for miles

These days, if its front-engine Italian grand touring that you’re after, the Ferrari 812 Superfast is the latest and greatest. While impressive in and of itself, the new 812 hails from a long line of F/R GT cars from the highly celebrated marque. In fact, we can trace its roots all the way back to this – the Ferrari Daytona. Originally dubbed the 365 GTB/4, this angular classic was popularized as the “Daytona” after Ferrari swept the podium at the 24 Hours of Daytona in 1967, and the name stuck ever since (even though Ferrari still insists on calling it the 365 GTB/4). First introduced at the 1968 Paris Auto Show, the Daytona was ushered in as a replacement for the Ferrari 275 GTB/4, and came equipped with a larger Colombo V-12 engine, independent suspension, and the right stuff for high-speed cruising.

The Daytona was offered in two distinct body styles, including the GTB/4 Berlinetta, and the much more rare GTS/4 Spider. A handful of racing versions were created as well. Production lasted until 1973 with nearly 1,300 units built in total, after which the mid-engine 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer replaced the Daytona in 1973. Now, the Daytona is a classic collectible automobile, with some examples easily eclipsing the seven-figure mark at auction. So what makes it so great? Read on to find out.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 Daytona.

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RM Sotheby's Will Offer a Stunning Collection of Ferraris in Monterey This Year

RM Sotheby’s Will Offer a Stunning Collection of Ferraris in Monterey This Year

Got a few million to burn? Head to California next month and grab one of these beauties

Every year, as the summer slowly fades to fall, Monterey, California is inundated by top-dollar four-wheeled machinery. It’s called Monterey Car Week, and in addition to classic racing at Laguna Seca and world-class show and shine at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, this annual auto orgy also plays host to numerous high-end collector car auctions. One of the best is put on by RM Sotheby’s, which just announced it would offer up a lineup of no less than 13 of some of the most desirable Ferraris on the planet.

It makes sense to bring these machines to Monterey. After all, this is the town where in 2014, a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO sold for a whopping $38 million to become the most expensive car ever sold at public auction. Celebrities rub shoulders with collectors and well-heeled enthusiasts in a nearly endless sea of pricey metal, and counter-bids are in increments big enough to buy a house. It’s the perfect place for a spread like this, which spans a full half-century of Ferrari’s greatest hits. Upping the excitement, most models are offered without reserve, and all but two are painted a searing shade of Rosso Corsa red. The heavy hitter of the bunch is a silver 1961 250 GT SWB Berlinetta by Scaglietti, which is expected to change hands for somewhere between $8.5 and $10 million.

Continue reading for the full story.

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James May Shows Us A Different Way To Do A Walk-Around Video

James May Shows Us A Different Way To Do A Walk-Around Video

It’s far from what we’re used to, but it works.

By now, you’ve probably seen your share of walk-around videos featuring beautiful concepts, insane exotics, and timeless classics. The set-up typically involves a lot of narration, some funky background music, and plenty of glam shots of the car from every conceivable angle. It’s a tried-and-tested method that has given birth to some pretty awesome videos, but ever the contrarian, The Grand Tour’s James May has provided us with a different sort of walk-around video from what we’re used to. Instead of infusing the video with pageantry, he simply walks around the car. Who knew!

The video in question is posted on Drivetribe’s Facebook page and it features May and a Ferrari 308 GTB that he reportedly bought earlier this year. There’s only one camera involved in the video and absolutely no background music to spice it up. What we do see is May leisurely walking around his new Ferrari acquisition, stopping a few times to look closer at certain sections of the car, before completing his literal walk-around. Then he looks at the camera, flashes that unmistakable James May face of approval, and walks off. No commentary. No music (apart from the intro and conclusion). No nothing. It’s definitely a different approach from what we’re used to, but May somehow makes it look authentic and meaningful at the same time. Who knew that Captain Slow could say a thousand words without having to open his mouth.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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