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2020 Ferrari Monza SP1 by Novitec

2020 Ferrari Monza SP1 by Novitec

Novitec’s tuning program for the Monza SP1 will blow your mind!

The Ferrari Monza SP1 is a rare breed, even for Ferrari’s standards. It’s limited to just 500 units with the equally audacious Monza SP2, the Monza SP1 is a proper Ferrari speedster that carries 799 horsepower from its 6.5-liter V-12 engine. It’s properly powerful as all speedsters should be, but there really is no such thing as too much power, is there? German tuning firm Novitec swears by that motto, and the Monza SP1 benefits from it. What kind of aftermarket program did Novitec create for the fanciful Monza SP1? Let’s find out.

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1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

Maybe the most beautiful open-top car that money can buy

The entire Ferrari 250 line seems to have secured its place in the palace of automotive royalties for generations to come. With unmistakable lines, a variety of powerful but also reliable Colombo V-12s, and limited-run production, almost all of the late-50s to early-60s Ferrari 250 models command astronomical values at auction nowadays.

There are, of course, some stars that shine brighter than others, such as the 250 GTO, the 250 GT SWB, and, lastly, the 250 California SWB Spider built between 1960 and 1962. This is one of those short-wheelbase California Spiders but, despite its originality, it lacks the aura of the ex-Alain Delon ’barn find’ that sold for $18.5 million four years ago.

Besides the fact that Alain Delon once owned and thrashed that particular 250 California SWB Spider, what made it even more desirable were its covered headlights. Amazingly, the more sought after variant is, actually, the one Ferrari made more of: a total of 37,250 California SWB Spiders left the factory with covered headlights and just 19 were optioned without the glass over the twin circular headlamps. Read on to learn more about the strange case of a buyer-induced trend that goes against the otherwise untouchable principle of rarity.

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2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

Ferrari’s replacement for the 488 Spider is just as powerful as the track-ready 488 Pista

The Ferrari F8 Spider is the convertible version of the F8 Tributo. It replaces the outgoing Ferrari 488 Spider in the lineup and just like its coupe counterpart, it features technology and underpinnings from the track-bred 488 Pista. While not as dynamic as the 488 Pista Spider, it’s a solid improvement over the 488 Spider. The F8 Spider joins a prestigious bloodline of drop-top V-8 sports cars that begun with the iconic 308 GTS back in 1977.

Ferrari’s most powerful V-8 convertible alongside the 488 Pista Spider, the F8 Spider arrives just in time to compete with the Lamborghini Huracan Evo Spyder. It also goes against the McLaren 720S Spider, yet another fine example of the high-performance sports car market. Find out what sets apart the F8 Spider from its predecessors and how it compares with its rivals in the detailed review below.

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2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

The front-engined, V-12 convertible GT returns after 50 years

The Ferrari 812 GTS is the convertible version of the 812 Superfast, the grand tourer that replaced the F12berlinetta in 2017. Ferrari’s range-topping drop-top as of 2019, the 812 GTS is also the company’s first production, front-engined, V-12 convertible since 1969. After 20 years of limited edition grand tourers with infinite headroom, Ferrari finally caved in a build a production-ready, drop-top grand tourer.

Besides the "GTS" badge and the minor changes above the waistline, this drop-top is pretty much identical to the 812 Superfast. It has the same 6.5-liter V-12 engine under the hood and comes with almost 800 horsepower on tap. It needs less than three seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start and tops out at more than 200 mph. All told, it’s one of the most potent grand tourers on the market and a turning point for Ferrari, which just released its first full-production convertible GT in 50 years. Find out more about that in the review below.

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1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

The shark-nosed sports prototype from Maranello

The Drake, a man who honed his craft as the team boss of Alfa Corse in the ’30s, carried some of the old adages over when he started his own automotive company. It’s no wonder, then, that he was reluctant to jump on the rear-mid engine train when it boomed two decades after the last pre-war Grand Prix but when his Prancing Horses finally rolled out with the engine aft of the driver they proved overwhelmingly good: in F1, the 156 steamrolled its way to both the Constructor’s and the Driver’s F1 title in 1961 and, in long-distance racing, the 196 SP, as a direct descendant of the 246 SP, foresaw what was to come in sports car racing.

The 196 SP is an incredibly rare and incredibly gorgeous beast. With a low-slung body and a nose very similar to that of the 156 F1 car, it carried what was good about the 246 SP, the first Ferrari mid-engined sports car that was unveiled in 1961, and improved on the formula. Under the rear deck, there was, effectively, half of a Colombo V-12, and not the Dino V-6 although the 196 SP has been referred to as the Dino 196 SP in some circles. Five were built for 1962 and this one, chassis #0806 is the only that has survived. RM/Sotheby’s tried selling it during the Monterey Car Week but failed. Still, the car is valued at anywhere between $8 million and $10 million. Keep reading to find out why this V-6-engined Ferrari is worth more than twice the price of a LaFerrari, Maranello’s V-12 hybrid wonder.

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2018 Ferrari SP3JC

2018 Ferrari SP3JC

Maranello’s latest-one creation was ordered by a former freelance writer

Following a long line of one-off creations, Ferrari has built another one-make masterpiece, called the SP3JC. Based on the Ferrari F12tdf, the SP3JC is effectively the F12 Spider we never had. It has no roof (obviously), and it wears a funky tri-color paint scheme that really doesn’t do justice to the exclusivity of this model. Scottish collector John Collins owns this model after commissioning Ferrari to build it more than three years ago. The wait was long, but the final product made it worth it.

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1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

A classic open-top Prancing Horse, ready for export

The Ferrari 340 America was the first model in the America series conceived with export in mind, used as a means to increase Ferrari’s footprint in the United States. The 340 featured a brand-new Lampredi V-12 which made its way to Formula 1, with this particular car racing at Le Mans twice in the early ’50s.

The Ferrari America series was launched at the dawn of the ’50s to appeal to American customers who wanted less rugged interior premises, bigger engines, and more performance. The first car of this lineage was the 340 America, which debuted at the 1950 Paris Motor Show in full racing trim. Granted, most Ferraris back then were as much race cars as they were road cars, but a customer could personalize his car to be more friendly on the road with softer suspension, different gearbox ratios, or new engine settings.

As this is a Ferrari from the early days of the company, it was made in very few numbers, on order from importers or customers. Barely 23 cars were completed between 1950 and 1952, with three coachbuilders taking care of the body. Carrozzeria Touring built six Barchetta and two Berlinetta bodies, Vignale crafted five Spyder bodies, five Berlinetta bodies, and one larger Convertible, while Ghia built only four fixed-head Coupes.

The car seen here is chassis #0116/A, the third 340 America built, and one of the 6 Barchettas by Touring. It ran briefly in period, its highlights being a couple of entries in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Owner Pierre-Louis Dreyfus shared the car in 1951 with well-known Grand Prix driver Louis Chiron and, in 1952, Rene Dreyfus. While the car didn’t reach the finish line on either occasion, it went on to sell for $8,430,000 during the 2016 RM Sotheby’s auction in Monaco.

Read on to understand why the 340 America commands such high prices.

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2018 Ferrari Monza SP2

2018 Ferrari Monza SP2

It’s the Ferrari 812 with classic styling and seating for two

Ferrari’s shock launch of two brand-new super cars, the Monza SP1 and SP2 put everyone under the pressure of a choice: to go or not go solo. The SP2 is the Barchetta that encourages you to be friendly and take someone with you for the passenger ride of a lifetime aboard the fastest non-hybrid Prancing Horse ever – with no windshield!

The Icona line of special, limited run cars is off to a scorching start with two new beauties dubbed the SP1 and the SP2 Monza. The name isn’t new; instead, just like the cars, it draws from Ferrari’s long and storied racing heritage. The Monza was one of Ferrari’s Barchetta-style sports racing cars from the ‘50s which had its successes on the track but faded into obscurity in the decades that followed. It’s nice to see Ferrari bringing back this nameplate, especially on such eye-wateringly beautiful cars.

It’s good to know that the Icona program is set to run for at least four years, so we’re certain we’ll see more amazing products coming their way considering Louis Camilleri assertion that Ferrari looks to debut up to 15 new cars in the following years. The scope is to increase the sales to $5,000,000,000 by 2022 which would be a 68% increase from the figure registered at the end of last year.

While we’re almost sure that some of those sales will come off of the launch of Ferrari’s much-rumored SUVs, we’ve got to live in the moment and enjoy the Monza SP1 and SP2 for what they are: Ferrari’s fastest non-hybrid cars. The fact that they follow the old norm of a front-mounted V-12 sending the power to the back wheels is just the cream atop an amazing pie.

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2018 Ferrari Monza SP1

2018 Ferrari Monza SP1

A modern Ferrari car with a classic twist

Ferrari shocks everyone again and launches two open-top sports cars for the road as part of a new program called Icona. They are the Monza SP1 and SP2; they look like bonkers re-imagined ‘50s racers, and will be made in very limited quantities – all of which have been already sold.

Just as I was lamenting the other day about the disappearance of coachbuilding, Ferrari decides to get up and unveil a whole new line of cars under the Icona moniker. We know about Ferrari’s Special Projects program that builds one-off models, sometimes starting from a clean piece of paper, for Maranello’s most-trusted and respected buyers. The cars that will come through the Icona program won’t be one-offs, but you still won’t see more than 200 made of each. That’s, apparently, how many new Monzas they will build and, despite a $1,400,000 price tag, all have been sold. Indeed, it’s a cheap price to ask considering a one-off Ferrari – for which all slots have been reserved all the way until 2021 – starts at about $3,000,000.

With the occasion of Ferrari’s Capital Markets Day, the Italian automaker debuted the Icona program on the premises of its new Centro Stile facility in Maranello. The program, which is slated to run until 2022 for the very least, will see more cars built using the same recipe: design philosophy that harkens back to the old days in combination with the latest Ferrari underpinnings.

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2019 Ferrari 488 Pista Spider

2019 Ferrari 488 Pista Spider

Maranello’s most powerful V-8 car goes topless

The Ferrari 488 Pista Spider joined the 488 lineup at the 2018 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance as a replacement for the 458 Speciale Aperta. The Ferrari 488 Pista replaced the iconic 458 Speciale, and it’s the first of its kind to hide a turbocharged engine under the hood.

Just when we thought that Ferrari settled for the Aperta name for its convertible sports car, Maranello returned to using the old Spider badge. But this is arguably a small issue here, as the Pista Aperta is just as exciting as its coupe sibling, but with extra headroom when the top is removed. The 50th drop-top model built by Ferrari since 1947, the Pista Spider made its global debut in the United States, where convertible sports cars are more popular than everywhere else in the world. Let’s have a closer look at the latest member of the 488 family in the review below..

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 Pista Spider.

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2017 Ferrari 488 Spider N-Largo by Novitec Rosso

2017 Ferrari 488 Spider N-Largo by Novitec Rosso

Convertible 488 gets a shots of aero and power from noted tuner

What’s possible within the aftermarket tuning scene? That’s a question I’ve heard from a lot of people, and while I can’t fully inform them of the specific benefits of going this route with their vehicles, I do tell them that “anything’s possible” when it comes to this world, especially if you have a vivid imagination and deep pockets. Take Novitec for example. The German tuner is famous for building programs for some of the world’s most exquisite exotics, including today’s lineup of Ferrari sports and supercars. Responsible for these kits is Novitec Rosso, and it’s just announced its latest tuning program for one of Maranello’s most recent models, the Ferrari 488 Spider.

Those who are familiar with Novitec’s N-Largo kit will know that the tuner has already unveiled a similar kit for a handful of other Ferrari supercars, including the F12 and the hardtop version of the Ferrari 488. The program’s formula is pretty simple too: drop a load of aerodynamic components, piece them all together, and then work on getting more power out of the engine. Suffice to say, that’s exactly what Novitec Rosso did to the 488 Spider, and the results are exactly what you’d expect them to be from a tuner that has about as excellent a reputation as any company of its kind in the business.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Ferrari 488 Spider N-Largo by Novitec Rosso

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2017 Ferrari 488 Spider Heartthrob

2017 Ferrari 488 Spider Heartthrob

New "Heartthrob" 488 Spider could find its way into an auction house in the coming months

Mere days after the one-off Ferrari 488 Spider “Green Jewel” fetched a whopping $1.3 million at RM Sotheby’s Leggenda e Passione sale in Fiorano, Italy, Ferrari took to the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show to present its latest anniversary showpiece. Once again, it’s based on the 488 Spider, only this time, it’s rocking a blue body, a red interior, and a different nickname: Heartthrob.

The one-off supercar officially goes by the name Ferrari 488 Spider Heartthrob and was created to pay tribute to the 1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Spider PF, one of only 14 open-top models designed and built by Pininfarina. Its place in Ferrari lore is cemented by the fact that its owner, Dominican racer and noted playboy Porfirio Rubirosa, drove it in just one international race, here it placed eighth overall and second in its class. That car sported a blue exterior and wore the number 235. Hardly a surprise then that the 488 Spider Heartthrob is wearing the same finish with the same number on its doors. It also gets a red leather interior, which is another nod to the classic Ferrari racer. Given the precedence of auctioning off these one-off 70th anniversary Ferraris, it’s highly unlikely that we’ll see the Heartthrob get a price tag. Instead, it could follow in the “Green Jewel’s” footsteps and find its way into an auction setting sooner than later. If that one-off went for $1.3 million, care to guess how much the Heartthrob will go for? Safe to say that a seven-figure estimate may be a little conservative at this point.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta #210

2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta #210

Could this be the hypercar that sells for $10 million?

The last Ferrari Laferrari Aperta is headed to the auction block this weekend. That alone should be enough to warrant headlines, but as most of you already know, the auction-bound LaFerrari Aperta is special in its own right. This unit isn’t supposed to exist in the first place. This is the 210th LaFerrari Aperta, a last-second creation by Maranello that isn’t a part of the initial lot of 209 units that the automaker planned to launch but was nonetheless built as an auction piece to benefit the “Save the Children” charity.

The auction is set to take place at Ferrari’s Fiorano track and is part of RM Sotheby’s “Legend e Passione” event being held as part of the Italian automaker’s 50th anniversary. Befitting the event on September 9, Ferrari gave the LaFerrari Aperta a unique look no other model of its kind had when they all came out of production. These features firmly establish the 210th model as a legitimate one-of-a-kind LaFerrari Aperta, the kind of car that Ferrari collectors will trip over themselves to get a hold of. It’s no surprise then that neither Ferrari nor RM Sotheby’s has released an estimate for the car. Considering that the 500th LaFerrari – the precursor of the 210th LaFerrari Aperta – fetched $7 million in a similar auction setting last year, the sky really is the limit as to how much the 210th LaFerrari Aperta is going to sell for this weekend.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2015 Ferrari Sergio

2015 Ferrari Sergio

If there was ever a concept that truly embodied the long-standing partnership between Ferrari and Pininfarina, it would be the 2013 Ferrari Sergio. The concept burst onto the scene at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show as a tribute model to the late Sergio Pininfarina. Reports that the Sergio was earmarked for production first surfaced in September 2014, and a little over a month later, a new report indicated that Ferrari and Pininfarina were actually building production models of the radical concept. Now, the wait is over, as it was recently officially announced that the first Ferrari Sergio has been delivered to the SBH Royal Auto Gallery at Abu Dhabi’s Yas Marina Circuit in the United Arab Emirates.

Ferrari and Pininfarina, the two architects behind the Sergio Concept, built six production versions of the radical supercar, each coming with a price tag of $3 million. The price is admittedly way more than I can afford, but for the six individuals Ferrari invited to snatch up the limited-edition piece, spending $3 million on an ultra-exclusive supercar can be considered money well spent.

Unfortunately, all six models have already been spoken for. Based on the Ferrari 458 Spider, the roadster was "created to celebrate the spirit and core values of the historic Cambiano company in the 60th anniversary year of its collaboration with the Prancing Horse," as stated in a press release.

The car is not only striking to look at, it’s also, unsurprisingly, intended to be extremely driver oriented, as is emphasized in the press release: "An authentic open-top, it explicitly references the track, underscoring and intensifying its sense of sportiness, fun behind the wheel and the pleasure of design at its purest."

Each of the six Ferrari Sergios was carefully customized by its owner at a workshop in Maranello, where a large variety of colors, materials, and finishes were on hand to suit their personal tastes. The result, clearly, is a car that’s fast, beautiful, and absolutely unique.

Updated 08/24/2017: We added a series of images taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Click past the jump to read more.

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2018 Ferrari Portofino

2018 Ferrari Portofino

The California is dead, long live the Portofino!

Launched in 2008, the Ferrari California is the company’s only convertible grand tourer. At first powered by a naturally aspirated V-8, it received a twin-turbo unit in 2014, when it was redesigned and rebadged as the California T. Come 2017 and the drop-top was once again upgraded, this time around gaining more significant changes on the outside. The nameplate was again modified, which comes at no surprise given that the facelifts of both the F12berlinetta and FF brought new names into dealerships. The California was renamed the Portofino, and it’s now more powerful than ever.

While the California name was rather familiar and dates back to the late 1950s, the Portofino is a brand-new nameplate for the Italian firm. But much like California, it was also borrowed from a geographic area, this time around from the Italian town of Portofino. Ferrari explains that this name was selected because the city has become " internationally synonymous with elegance, sportiness and understated luxury." It may take a while to get used to seeing this name on a Ferrari, but needless to say, it’s more than appropriate for the redesigned California. Keep reading to find out why.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Portofino.

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2015 Ferrari 458 Speciale A

2015 Ferrari 458 Speciale A

Ferrari unveiled the 458 Italia in 2010, then followed that up with the more precise and track-ready 458 Speciale in 2014. As is the tradition with all modern mid-engined Ferraris, Maranello creates a great car, then a year or two later it chops the top off of it to create a roadster version. We knew it was coming, but now the convertible version of the Ferrari 458 Speciale is here, and it’s calling it the “A."

It may be a silly name, but that A stands for Aperta, the Italian word for open. This is also more than a simple roofless version of the 458 Speciale; the Speciale A features the most powerful naturally aspirated V-8 the company has ever used in a spider. Compared to the old 458 Spider, this new machine is faster and more powerful, and Ferrari was even able to keep the weight down. This new car only weighs 50 kg (110 pounds) more than its hard-top sibling.

If you want one, you need to get your order in yesterday. Ferrari is limiting this new car to just 499 units. We don’t know how many of those are slated for U.S. consumption, but rest assured it won’t be a lot. If you are undecided about taking home one of these beauties, hit that jump and read our full overview of this incredible new Italian convertible.

Updated 08/18/2017: We added a series of new images taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Continue reading to find out more about the Ferrari 458 Speciale A.

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2017 Ferrari 488 GTS Triple-Seven by Wheelsandmore

2017 Ferrari 488 GTS Triple-Seven by Wheelsandmore

How does 777 horsepower sound to you?

The Ferrari 488 GTS is a saucy piece of machinery that makes even the most hardened of men tremble in breathless anticipation. In a lot of ways, it qualifies as a dream car, the kind that ends up as bedroom posters all over the world. But what if there was a way to make the 488 GTS better than it already is? As we’ve seen over and over again, anything is possible when you have an aftermarket company that knows what it’s doing. Good thing then that Wheelsandmore fits that mold because we don’t need to be convinced about its new program for the 488 GTS. We already know that it’s going to be good, and if others need convincing, all they need to hear is 777 horsepower’s worth of fun and fury.

That, in a nutshell, is what the German tuner is offering, hence the appropriately named “Triple Seven” program. It’s a typical Wheelsandmore tuning project though so there are some holes in it, not the least of which is the lack of any meaningful aerodynamic and interior upgrades to the drop-top Prancing Horse. Never mind those though because we’ve come to expect that from the tuner. What we do know is that when it comes to engine tunes and proper wheels, there aren’t that many tuners out there that are on the level of Wheelsandmore. It’s got a litany of previous programs to make its case and this one for the 488 GTS is the latest example of that.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Ferrari 488 GTS Triple Seven by Wheelsandmore

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2017 Ferrari 488 Spider 4XX Siracusa by Mansory

2017 Ferrari 488 Spider 4XX Siracusa by Mansory

Hard to imagine a more aggressive looking Ferrari 488 Spider

There are tuners who are best known for their visual stylings while there are others who are recognized for the power upgrades they offer. Then there’s a tuner like Mansory, which blends all of these elements together to create programs like the one it gave to the new Ferrari 488 Spider. The kit itself is called “4XX Siracusa,” and those who routinely follow the aftermarket tuning scene will know that Mansory has used this name before, previously on the Ferrari 458 Italia back in 2011 and most recently on the Ferrari 488 GTB. Now it’s the 488 Spider’s turn and, as expected, there’s a lot going on here, including power gains that elevate the car’s output to within 800 horsepower.

In a lot of ways, this is to be expected considering that this is Mansory we’re talking about. The German tuner has routinely prepared some of the most polarizing programs in the business. For the most part, Mansory’s offerings are hit or miss, but whether we like them or not, there’s no denying that they’re all worth talking about, for better or worse.

Take this 4XX Siracusa kit for the 488 Spider as an example. Technically, the upgrades themselves are similar to the ones the 488 GTB received last year, right down to the split rear spoiler. But there is difference in how the upgrades react to the body style of the supercar, which is why we’re here to talk about it.

No matter which side of the fence you’re on regarding Mansory, the tuner always incites discussion, which in itself makes it worth talking about. This new Siracusa program for the Ferrari 488 Spider is a pretty good example of that.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Ferrari 488 Spider 4XX Siracusa by Mansory.

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Ferrari J50

Ferrari J50

The first bespoke, limited-edition model based on the Ferrari 488 goes to Japan

Introduced in 2015, the Ferrari 488 GTB replaced the 458 Italia as the company’s entry-level supercar. On top of bringing a revised styling language to the market, the 488 also marks the beginning of new era for Ferrari’s most affordable sports car, with the naturally aspirated 4.5-liter V-12 being replaced by a twin-turbo, 3.9-liter V-8. A convertible Spider version was released at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show, while the 488 GTE and GT3 were launched to enable the nameplate to race in various events and series’ around the world. In late 2016, Ferrari presented the first-ever bespoke supercar based on the 488. It goes by the name J50 and it is based on the Spider model.

Launched during a special celebration at the National Art Center in Tokyo, the J50 commemorates the 50th anniversary of Ferrari in Japan. Created by Ferrari’s Special Projects department and designed by the Ferrari Styling Centre team in Maranello, it also marks the return of the targa body style, paying tribute to popular Ferraris of the 1970s and 1980s. If you’re not familiar with them, check out the Ferrari 308 and 328 GTS, but examples also include more recent cars such as the 348 GTS and F355 GTS.

To be sold in Japan only, the J50 is will be limited to only 10 units and each one will be tailored specifically to the customer’s requirements.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari J50.

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2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta

2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta

Maranello’s quickest supercar yet loses its roof

The Ferrari LaFerrari made its first public appearance at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show, taking center stage in spite of massive competition from the McLaren P1 and the Lamborghini Veneno. Not only the fastest road-legal supercar to come out of Maranello, the LaFerrari is also the first Ferrari to carry a hybrid powertrain. Developed as a successor to the almighty Enzo and the F50, the LaFerrari is the first Ferrari not to be designed by Pininfarina since 1973.

Built in just 499 units and priced from $1.7 million, the LaFerrari became an instant hit with deep-pocketed enthusiasts, who rushed to pay the hefty sticker and help Ferrari close order books in a matter of months. Although both the standard supercar and the highly exclusive, track-only FXX K are already sold out, the LeFerrari saga continues in 2017 with a convertible version.

Rumors about a LaFerrari convertible have been flying around since 2014, when we rendered the model based on the coupe version. Come 2016 and Ferrari CEO Sergio Marchionne finally confirmed that a drop-top model is in the works. In July 2016, Maranello unleashed the first official photos of the Laferrari Aperta, while the Paris Motor Show hosted to supercar’s public debut.

Updated 11/11/2016: Ferrari dropped a very cool promo video for the LaFerrari Aperta with Formula 1 driver, Sebastian Vettel behind the wheel.

Continue reading to find out more about the LaFerrari Aperta.

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1989 Ferrari Testarossa Convertible

1989 Ferrari Testarossa Convertible

An ‘80s icon goes topless

In the mid-‘80s, Ferrari introduced the Testarossa, a two-door berlinetta created as a replacement for the Berlinetta Boxer 512i. The name was a nod to the Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa race car that ran in the World Sportscar Championship in the late ‘50s, but the new model was anything but old school. Occupying the top of the Prancing Horse model lineup, the new Testarossa was subsequently well received amongst critics and the buying public. Not only was it popularized by the show Miami Vice, but several prominent celebrities owned one, and eventually, the Testarossa became a well known symbol of ‘80s culture. Considering the popularity, you’d expect Ferrari to be eager to produce a drop-top version of the 12-cylinder sports car, but not so – only one “official” Testarossa convertible was ever produced, forcing custom builders to make their own roofless variants after the fact. This car is one of those rare custom Testarossa convertibles.

At its heart, the car you see here is a 1989 model. It’s nearly identical in every single way to the Testarossas that rolled out from Maranello and into Ferrari dealerships nearly three decades ago, save the infinitely expanded headroom.

This Testarossa convertible is on offer from Paris Prestige Cars, a French dealer of high-end sports cars, and it’s a rare convertible example of one of Ferrari’s most popular models.

Continue reading to learn more about this Ferrari Testarossa Convertible.

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2016 Ferrari 488 GTS By Novitec Rosso

2016 Ferrari 488 GTS By Novitec Rosso

German tuner gives new Ferrari supercar an upgrade that’s fit for its stature

We may be in the dog days of summer, but for a perennially busy aftermarket tuner like Novitec Rosso, no amount of idle time can make up for creating a tuning program for one of the market’s newest supercars, the Ferrari 488 GTS. That’s exactly what the German tuner did, doing so only two months after unveiling a similar kit for the 488 GTB. Much like the earlier program, Novitec Rosso’s work on the 488 GTS revolves around an engine upgrade that puts some extra muscle to the Ferrari’s 3.9-liter twin-turbo V-8 engine, resulting in a new output of 772 horsepower and 658 pound-feet of torque.

The numbers are identical to what the tuner was able to get out of the coupe version. Rest assured though, the effects are far different, both from a performance standpoint and from a wind-blowing-your-hair point-of-view. Better yet, the enhancements don’t just end with the engine upgrades. It wouldn’t be a Novitec Rosso tuning kit if it was strictly limited to that. The German tuner is also known for its carbon fiber aero bits and without disappointment, Novitec is also offering a full aerodynamic body kit that’s even been subjected to strenuous wind tunnel testing.

As expected, a new set of wheels is also part of the program and an interior upgrade that’s largely left to the whims and financial might of the customer. In other words, this tuning kit for the Ferrari 488 GTS is a trademark Novitec Rosso program, complete with all the bells and whistles that have come to define the well-established aftermarket company.

Continue after the jump to read the full review.

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