Back to Ferrari

Ferrari Cool Fast Car reviews

view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
2020 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

2020 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

There Is No Other Car In the World Like the Ferrari SF90 Stradale

Ferrari dropped the bomb. The biggest that has ever fallen on the car world scene. It is the plug-in hybrid Ferrari SF90 Stradale, a production car that is more powerful and quicker than the LaFerrari itself. Inspired by none other than the F1 car, the new Ferrari SF90 Stradale became the Ferrari-first plug-in hybrid with a propulsion technology consisting of three electric motors and an overpowered V-8. Aptly named after the Scuderia Ferrari’s 90th anniversary and, coincidentally, the 2019 Ferrari F1 car, the Ferrari SF90 Stradale is the closest to a Ferrari F1 car you can experience on public roads.

Ferrari unveiled the car at a special event where Ferrari F1 drivers Sebastien Vettel and Charles Leclerc drove two SF90 Stradale cars onto the scene.

Disclosure: this is not the Ferrari LaFerrari successor. It is a whole new car that does not follow the F40, F50, Enzo, and the LaFerrari lineage. In fact, it is far less expensive compared to any of them. Nevertheless, it is much quicker too.

Read more
2020 Ferrari Roma

2020 Ferrari Roma

Ferrari has introduced the Roma, a car that is considered to be the most elegant and exotic Ferrari ever made. It features the latest concept of “Nuove Dolce Vita” (New Sweet Life) design that improves on a number of things, the most important of which is aerodynamics. The Roma has a traditional shark nose up front with linear LED headlights while the side profile is void of the usual side shields – a move that harkens back to the 1950s. The rear end features and active spoiler and a compact diffuser that just exudes the car’s sporty and performance-oriented nature.

The interior has an evolved version of the of the dual-cockpit concept that includes an individual cell for the driver and passenger – a design that gives the passenger the feeling of being a co-pilot. Interior materials include:

Full-grain Frau leather Alcantara Chromed aluminum Carbon fiber

Power comes from a 3.0-liter V-8 that’s good for 612 horsepower and 561 pound-feet of torque – the former of which represents a 20-horsepower increase over the car it’s based on. The Roma, in this specification, can reach 62.1 mph (100 km/h) in 3.4 seconds on the way to a top speed of 200 mph. Ferrari has yet to release pricing details, but word has it that an MSRP of at least $225,000 is expected.

Read more
2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo

2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo

The ultimate LaFerrari!

When a high-profile carmaker such as Ferrari launches a great supercar like the LaFerrari, it’s difficult to imagine a way to significantly improve the design. But the team from Maranello has already done it twice. First, Ferrari launched the FXX-K, a track-only LaFerrari with enhanced aerodynamics. This happened back in 2015. Two years have passed, and the Prancing Horse found a way to make the FXX-K even more brutal. It’s called the FXX-K Evo, and it has more downforce than any Ferrari to date!

Launched at the 2017 Finali Mondiale of the Ferrari Challenge, the FXX-K Evo takes the familiar FXX-K to a new level in the same way that the

Enzo

based FXX Evoluzione was a heavily upgraded FXX. Just like the FXX-K, the Evo is not homologated for road use, and production will be limited to only a few models. However, the Evo is also available as an upgrade to the standard FXX-K. The package includes many add-ons, starting with an aerodynamic kit built upon know-how obtained from the many racing series Ferrari competes in, including Formula One, GT3, GTE, and Challenge. It’s also lighter due to increased use of carbon-fiber and despite having a much larger rear wing. Yes, the FXX-K is a monster of a LaFerrari so keep reading my full review to find out more.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari FXX-K Evo.

Read more
2018 Ferrari Portofino

2018 Ferrari Portofino

The California is dead, long live the Portofino!

Launched in 2008, the Ferrari California is the company’s only convertible grand tourer. At first powered by a naturally aspirated V-8, it received a twin-turbo unit in 2014, when it was redesigned and rebadged as the California T. Come 2017 and the drop-top was once again upgraded, this time around gaining more significant changes on the outside. The nameplate was again modified, which comes at no surprise given that the facelifts of both the F12berlinetta and FF brought new names into dealerships. The California was renamed the Portofino, and it’s now more powerful than ever.

While the California name was rather familiar and dates back to the late 1950s, the Portofino is a brand-new nameplate for the Italian firm. But much like California, it was also borrowed from a geographic area, this time around from the Italian town of Portofino. Ferrari explains that this name was selected because the city has become " internationally synonymous with elegance, sportiness and understated luxury." It may take a while to get used to seeing this name on a Ferrari, but needless to say, it’s more than appropriate for the redesigned California. Keep reading to find out why.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Portofino.

Read more
2017 Ferrari F12tdf

2017 Ferrari F12tdf

Although the majority of Ferraris built over the last four decades have featured a mid-engine layout, there was a time when all of Maranello’s products were front-engined. Until the mid-1960s, Enzo Ferrari felt that a mid-engine Ferrari would be unsafe in the hands of customers. That changed in 1966, when Enzo, having seen the stir Lamborghini created with the 1966-1974 Lamborghini Miura, approved the V-6-powered 1967-1980 Ferrari Dino for production. Although mid-engined supercars became increasingly popular through the 1970s, Ferrari continued to build front-engined cars into the 21st century, with the current lineup including the 2013 Ferrari F12berlinetta, 2012 Ferrari FF, and 2015 Ferrari California T.

The F12berlinetta, a full-fledged grand tourer, harkens back to the 1968-1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 "Daytona" of the late 1960s, and in many way to the iconic 1964-1966 Ferrari 275 GTB and 1962-1964 Ferrari 250 GTO. Much like its predecessors, it spawned various one-off and special-edition models, including the 2014 Ferrari F12 TRS, 2015 Ferrari SP America, 2015 Ferrari F60 America, and the 2015 Carrozzeria Touring Berlinetta Lusso. Now, Ferrari injected more power into the F12berlinetta to create the F12tdf, a tribute to the legendary Tour de France automobile race, an event Maranello dominated from 1956 through 1964.

Originally rumored to wear a "Speciale" badge, the F12tdf is more than just a tribute car with added grunt. The F12berlinetta shell has been redesigned for improved downforce and weight has been reduce by means of extensive carbon-fiber and aluminum use. Additionally, the Italians used new state-of-the-art tech to make the F12tdf one of the quickest Ferraris out there. Find out more below.

Updated 08/17/2017: We added a series on new images and a video taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F12tdf.

Read more
2014 Ferrari LaFerrari

2014 Ferrari LaFerrari

Launched as a successor to the Ferrari Enzo, the Ferrari LaFerrari was designed with a language that, according to the design team led by Flavio Manzoni, is the perfect combination of form and function. It combines

F1

inspired aerodynamics and plenty of sharp character lines to bring together one of the wildest production cars from Ferrari. On the inside, the LaFerrari got a newly-designed steering wheel that is more square than it is round, and an overall interior design that screams track-only but offers plenty of comfort two. The biggest news is what makes this red rocket go. The new LaFerrari is the first car from the brand to use a hybrid drive system. Known as the HY-KERS system, it has a 6.3-liter V-12 and two electric motors. Total output is 963 horsepower (800 from the ICE and 163 from the electric motors) and more than 663 pound-feet of torque. To help keep everything kosher on the road, the suspension system has been designed specifically for the car, and Brembo brakes are in place to bring this puppy to a stop.

Ferrari went above and beyond with the LaFerrari, with the exception of the name, but don’t even get me started on that one. Outside of the name, however, Ferrari is bringing a heavy hitter to a supercar market that is now going hybrid. It is slated to compete against models like the wild McLaren P1 and the Porsche 918 Spyder – both of which have plenty of hybrid DNA in their genes. So, what separates the goofy-named LaFerrari from the pack of hybrid heavy hitters? Check out our full review below and you’ll find out that and more.

Updated 08/22/2016: Ferrari brought a satin black 2014 LaFerrari at the 2016 Mecum Auctions sale during Monterey Car Week, where it was auction for the record price of $4.7 million. Check the picture gallery for a new set of images taken during the auction.

Hit the jump to rear more about the new LaFerrari.

Read more
1996 Ferrari F50 GT

1996 Ferrari F50 GT

In 1984, Ferrari took the world by surprise when it revived the iconic GTO nameplate with a V-8-powered sports car. Developed as a homologation special based on the 308 GTB, the 288 GTO ultimately became Ferrari’s range-topping model between 1984 and 1987, and unlike its predecessor, it carried a twin-turbo V-8 behind the seats instead of a naturally aspirated V-12. The V-8 legacy continued with the mind-boggling F40 between 1987 and the mid-1990s, but Maranello went back to the high-revving V-12 with the F50 in 1995.

Significantly more exclusive than the F40, the F50 was built in only 349 units over two years and hit the streets with a 4.7-liter V-12 under the hood. The powerplant was based on the 333 SP’s, a race car built by Dallara that marked Ferrari’s official return to sports car racing after a 20-year absence in 1994.

But despite using a racing engine, the F50 never made it onto the track. While Ferrari developed a race-spec version to replace the F40 LM and Evoluzione, the project was cancelled as the Italians were unhappy with the FIA having allowed homologation specials such as the Porsche 911 GT1 join the BPR Global GT Series. The said race car was called the F50 GT and continued its life as a very exclusive road-legal vehicle sold to select customers. A sad yet interesting story, more of which you’ll find out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F50 GT.

Read more
1953 Ferrari 340 MM

1953 Ferrari 340 MM

Back in the days when Ferrari developed engines quicker than they could do gearboxes or bodies, as per Enzo’s belief that those who rely on aerodynamics can’t put together proper engines, many memorable roadsters were built using the 4.0-liter Lampredi V-12 as the centerpiece. Other configurations sprouted from this 1951-designed powerplant as the company continued to use this layout all throughout the decade. One of the most emblematic models of the 340 series is the 340 MM, which appeared as an evolution of previous 340 iterations in 1953.

As with other Ferrari cars, MM stood for Mille Miglia, the race for which the car was originally conceived and which its forerunner, the 340 America, had won in 1951. In truth, the MM was the real replacement of the America, being a real step forward from the so-called 340 Mexico from which it evolved.

With only 11 examples built, the 340 MM is an extremely rare car, especially since both Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera and Carrozzeria Vignale dealt with building spyder bodies while Pininfarina crafted the coupes. This means that nearly each example is unique in its own way. Couple this with the racing history of certain chassis and you get part of the reasoning behind the prices for which these cars change hands. One of the many in the myriad of Ferrari ultra-exotic rarities.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1953 Ferrari 340 MM Competition Vignale Spider.

Read more
1967 Ferrari Thomassima II

1967 Ferrari Thomassima II

Although it’s no longer popular in the 21st century, coachbuilding was a very active niche of the automotive industry until a few decades ago, with companies like Ghia, Zagato, Bertone, and Frua building customizing anything from luxury vehicles to sports cars. Most of them are unique and fetch ridiculous amounts at auctions, especially Ferraris, which change owners for millions of dollars.

However, while custom-built Ferraris such as the 250 Europa Coupe by Vignale or the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Speciale by Bertone have achieved cult status, not all unique Ferraris are as celebrated. The list of largely forgotten creations also includes the Thomassima, a trio of heavily modified Ferraris built by Tom Meade in the 1960s.

Born in Hollywood and raised in Australia and Hawaii, Meade spent most of the 1960s in Italy sourcing parts for his projects. Between 1962 and 1969, he built the Thomassima I, II, and III. While the first car was lost in a flood and the third one is being display at the Ferrari Museum in Modena, the Thomassima II was considered lost since 1971. Come 2015, the car resurfaced in the U.S. and it’s being sold on eBay.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1967 Ferrari Thomassima.

Read more
1987 - 1992 Ferrari F40

1987 - 1992 Ferrari F40

The 201 mph Ferrari F40 is unlike all other supercars: every year that passes, its stunning exterior design and brutal turbocharged power delivery seem even more appealing. In the new-is-best world of supercar ownership, the lasting and growing influence of this 30-year-old exotic is quite unique.

The F40 legend started with a bang as the final car to be presented by Enzo himself on the year of his death. Rows and rows of the matching Rosso Corsa red F40’s lined the Fiorano pit area with another key figure in Ferrari lore: a young Luca Di Montezemolo smiling in his 1980s power suit next to this line of exotica.

As much a story about the passionate men and women behind the scenes, there is almost nothing boring about the F40 in any way. Originally set for a 399-unit production run, the total swelled to more than 1,200 over the car’s lifetime from 1987 to 1992.

The F40’s shocking looks and speed are appreciating in value steadily, and may one day even overtake the Ferrari NART Sypder’s $27 million dollar auction record from this past weekend.

Until then, this Ferrari is already one for the ages. It is as much a joy to drive as it is to admire, almost like a fine painting — new details emerge and captivate the mind. Collectors are notoriously fastidious when it comes to flogging their prized investment, but the F40 is no show queen.

The F40 can dance. The mid-mounted V-8 engine’s then-state-of-the-art twin turbochargers power just the rear wheels through an 8-ball billiard gear knob and the classic polished H-gate pattern.

Weighing more than 500 pounds less than its arch rival — the Porsche 959 — the Ferrari F40 slams its driver toward any horizon at light speed (once those parallel IHI turbochargers spool up).

Updated 08/10/2015: A 1992 Ferrari F40 was auctioned this past weekend for a record €1.12 million ($1.22 million) at Coys auction at the 43rd AVD Oldtimer Grand Prix in Nurburgring, Germany. This amount represents a record for the F40, but it may not come at such a big surprise, considering it was the last model signed by Enzo Ferrari.

Click past the jump for the full review of the 1987 - 1992 Ferrari F40, arguably the absolute pinnacle of supercar design and influence.

Read more
1989 Ferrari F40 LM Barchetta

1989 Ferrari F40 LM Barchetta

A video that surfaced the Interwebz in April 2015, showing the Ferrari F40 LM Barchetta on TT Circuit Assen, the Netherlands, reminded me how classic cars can become stunning one-offs at the hands of their eccentric owners. The story of this car goes way back to 1993, when former racing driver Jean Blaton purchased a factory-built F40 LM that was previously raced in the North American IMSA GT Series, but not a lot is known about it nowadays. The car is not even regarded as a real Ferrari, mostly because Maranello was unhappy about what Blaton did to it, but that doesn’t make it less impressive than its factory siblings. And I aim to prove just that in the full review below.

Should Ferrari had recognized the Barchetta as a true-blue F40, it would’ve been the fourth official iteration of the nameplate, following the road car, the LM, of which only two were built for IMSA racing, and the F40 Competizione, also made for track use. All these cars were produced between 1987 and 1992, when Ferrari assembled 1,311 units at its factory in Maranello.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F40 LM Barchetta.

Read more
1991 Ferrari F40 by Gas Monkey Garage

1991 Ferrari F40 by Gas Monkey Garage

Here we are with some more Ferrari news; this time it is about a Ferrari F40.

The F40 was and still is an extremely potent track car that hails from the motorsport specialists at Ferrari. The F40 was built it to commemorate the prancing horse’s 40th anniversary, and it went on to win the hearts of car enthusiasts around the world. However, it is not a car you take for granted because it can turn around and bite you, if you lose focus behind the wheel.

That’s exactly what happened with a F40 owner sometime back. Sadly, he ended up crashing it to such an extent that he decided to sell it off. A bunch wise fellas from Gas Monkey Garage then bought it for $400,000 and set on the journey of rebuilding this awesome supercar.

What they came up with is even more breathtaking; a Ferrari F40 for the 21st century. A complete rebuild later, they now plan to auction it off at this year’s Barrett-Jackson auction. The restoration work was aired on the popular TV series "Fast N’ Loud" Given the long hours put in by the team, the car could fetch more than $1 million. So, a $600,000 margin may be good enough.

The 2014 Barrett-Jackson auction will be held from January 12th through 19th in Scottsdale, AZ.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari F40 by Gas Monkey Garage

Read more
1995 - 1997 Ferrari F50

1995 - 1997 Ferrari F50

The Ferrari F50 is by far the least popular of the firm’s first four generations of modern hypercars. All the world’s respect and awe for the F40 met the F50 at its debut, but the tide quickly turned for this $480,000 machine after reviewers and Ferrari customers alike revealed the F40 replacement’s familiar styling hid dynamics and a driver experience nowhere near the ferocity of the legendary original.

Instead of a peaky and violent Group B reject like the F40, the F50 was a heavy, high-speed missile with limited tractability at low speeds from the V-12 versus the explosive F40’s twin turbochargers and short gearing.

Make no mistake, there is nothing wrong with the performance of the F50, which easily spanked [the hottest thing available from Lamborghini at the time, the Diablo VT in sprint pace, as well as maximum velocity. The construction is carbon-fiber with the rigidity of a fortified bunker, the rear wing is eye-catching, and the 1990s makeover of the F40’s simple nose was beautiful, at first.

The F50 largely included the F40’s exaggerated and exotic proportions and clamshell hoods front and back. Headlamps above the bumper and hood’s leading edge were possible via shrouded enclosures for the first time in three decades, and the unadorned intake wears only a simple and modest prancing horse.

The F50 is an enjoyable case study for armchair experts and everyone else forced to endure Ferrari’s frequent grandstanding. It also shows a few nice things for all supercar fans, especially those who are, unfortunately, not debating which Ferrari to purchase (at least not any time soon)!

Click past the jump for the full debrief of the Ferrari F50: the Ferrari’s hypercar sophomore album that is now a study in what *not* to do when replacing a legend.

Read more
2004 ACAT Global Ferrari 575 by JBR Motorsports

2004 ACAT Global Ferrari 575 by JBR Motorsports

Typically the words “eco-friendly” and “performance” don’t mix together well, but sometimes they pull it off. A great example of a successful attempt is the ACAT Global Ferrari 575 by JBR Motorsports. ACAT Global specializes in making less expensive and lighter catalytic converters, whereas JBR focuses on building bad-ass race cars; a match made in heaven. This modified Ferrari 575 is set to take on one of the largest challenges in the world, and that is to overtake the world land speed record – in the Grand Touring class, of course – at the Bonneville Speed Flats.

JRB and ACAT have been tight lipped about what this Ferrari 575 has behind the rear seats, but we are 100 percent certain that it is a little more than the standard 515-horsepower 5.8-liter V-12 that the stock 575 boasts. Granted, that engine is good, but certainly not enough to beat out the Ferrari record of 232 mph.

The exterior of the Ferrari 575 is draped in a coat of French Blue Ferrari Racing paint with graphics by custom-graphics-extraordinaire, Troy Lee, but the remainder of the exterior modifications are still unknown at this time. We are certain that the Ferrari will boast a lower ride height to help with aerodynamics and a series of diffusers on the rear to help reduce the drag on the rear of the Ferrari.

As we approach the August 11th debut of the Ferrari 575, given it passes its 3-day testing phase, we will learn more about this super-fast Ferrari. We will pass information along to you, as we receive it.

Click past the jump to read the press release regarding its record-setting attempt.

view all
Read more
1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

The newest Ferrari in the Sherman Wolf estate that is up for auction at Pebble Beach on August 18th and 19th, 2012 is this 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO. The 288 GTO saw very limited production, as its models were only produced to allow homologation into FIA Group B Series. To get into this series, Ferrari had to build at least 200 models, but went a little further and created 272 examples.

FIA canceled the series, which resulted in the 288 GTO becoming a road car that was sold to the public. This 288 GTO example only has two previous owners, Wolf and Ronald Stern, and boasts just 6,000 miles. The body is coated in a bright red that looks like it just rolled off of the showroom floor, though there is no mention of a restoration.

Behind the driver sits a 2.8-liter V-8 engine that boasts a pair of IHI turbochargers and Weber-Mareli fuel injection. This engine pumps out 395 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 366 pound-feet of torque at 3,800 rpm. From 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph), the 288 GTO takes only 4.8 seconds. Add on an additional 4.4 seconds and you are at 160 km/h (100 mph). It runs the 1/4-mile in just 12.7 seconds and has a top speed of 305 km/h (190 mph).

On the front and rear, you get independent double-wishbone suspensions with coil springs. In addition, you also get 225/50R16 high-performance tires on the front, 255/50R16 tires on the rear, and vented disc brakes all the way around.

Gooding & Company expects this Ferrari to pull in between $750,000 and $900,000 at auction.

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

Read more
1957 Ferrari 500 TRC by Scaglietti

1957 Ferrari 500 TRC by Scaglietti

Another member of the four Ferraris heading to auction as a part of the late Sherman Wolf’s estate is a 1957 500 TRC by Scaglietti. The TRC is often recognized as one of the most beautiful Ferraris ever manufactured, much of which is accredited to Sergio Scaglietti’s work on this body. Only 19,500 TRCs were ever built and this particular model was initially sold to John von Neumann, then went to Dr. Frank Becker, then to Thor Thorson, and finally to Mr. Wolf about 20 years ago.

This car’s body looks to be in superb shape and is draped in a bright red, but there is no mention of it having ever been restored. Helping increase this 500 TRC’s value is that this model has 100 percent matching numbers.

Under the hood is a 2,498 cc (2.5-liter) 4-cylinder engine with twin ignition. This engine pumps out a healthy 220 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 190 pound-feet of torque at 5,400 rpm. It hits these high power numbers without the aid of any forced induction, which is rather amazing. The engine links up to a 4-speed manual transmission that serves up this power to a 3.78-to-1 rear axle.

Though it was considered a racecar, this 500 TRC boasts old-style 4-wheel drum brakes along with 5.25-inch spoked wheels on the front and 6-inch spoked wheels on the rear. The front suspension is an independent design with dual wishbones and coil springs. The rear suspension boasts a live axle with trailing arms and coil springs.

Gooding & Company anticipates this 1957 500 TRC by Scaglietti to fetch between $4.5 and $6.5 million.

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

Read more
1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

The Ferrari California Spider alone is one of the most desirable Ferraris and sports cars in the world. This 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione, which belonged to the late Sherman Wolf, is an even more desirable model, as it is one of nine examples that boast an all-alloy body and a long wheelbase. That rarity is something that will drive this car to between the $7 and $9 million mark.

This sample was actually the first Ferrari that the famed collector owned, and made its way to Wolf after first being owned by George Reed. Wolf also ran this Ferrari in the first ever Colorado Grand, just adding more to its storied history.

On the mechanical side, this 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione boasts full competition specifications. It has an outside plug motor that has TR heads resting on top of it, 4-wheel disc brakes, velocity stacks, and a ribbed gearbox to help keep it cool. The engine is a 2,953 cc V-12 with three Weber carbs mounted atop it and a 9.8-to-1 compression ratio. It punches out 280 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 203 pound-feet of torque at 5,500 rpm.

The body is draped in a medium shade of red and was fully restored by Ferrari specialist, David Carte. The wheels are the factory-style wires and the headlights boast the full-racing covers to help add to the car’s aerodynamic look.

This 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione is being offered up at the Pebble Beach Auction on August 18th and 19th, 2012 by Gooding & Company. It is one of four Ferraris owned by the Wolf estate that are up for auction in Pebble Beach.

UPDATE 08/20/2012: The Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione has just set a record at Monterey for all-time high price. The classic, drop-top sports car was auctioned off for a whopping $11,275,000! Someone really wanted that car!

Updated 12/27/2013: A Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider will be put on auction by RM Auctions in Arizona on Friday, January 17, 2014. The car is expected to fetch around $7-9 millions!

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

Read more
2012 Ferrari 599 GTX by SP Engineering and ADV.1 Wheels

2012 Ferrari 599 GTX by SP Engineering and ADV.1 Wheels

In their latest joint venture into the tuning world, ADV.1 wheels recently joined forces with SP Engineering to take a standard Ferrari 599 GTB and turn it into one of the most spectacular 599’s we’ve ever seen, with the newly announced 599 GTX.

Riding on incredible ADV15 Track Spec wheels which, as the name suggests, host an awesome 15-spoke design with matte bronze centers and an advanced three-piece construction. Created from forged aluminum, the ADV15 Track Spec wheels and the 599 GTX is set to replace the Novitec Ferrari F430 owned by ADV.1 Head Designer and President, Jordan Swerdloff.

Rather than completely overhauling the Ferrari’s standard, and already impressive 6.0-liter V-12 engine, SP Engineering have installed their GTX bodykit which features a carbon fiber front splitter, side skirts a small spoiler lip with a titanium exhaust system. Finishing off the set up are upgrades to both the suspension system and ECU unit.

Head to the gallery to check out the incredible array of photos released with this launch!

Read more
2007 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti Sessanta

2007 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti Sessanta

Technically, Ferrari debuted in 1929, but its official debut is recognized as 1947, the year that Ferrari began manufacturing street-legal vehicles. The 2007 model year marked the 60th anniversary of Ferrari’s street machine building life and the automaker wanted to make it a special one.

Instead of doing what many automakers do (see: Ford) by slapping “60th Anniversary” badges on every car that year, Ferrari chose to build 60 completely unique cars for the 2007 model year. To accomplish this, Ferrari took its existing 612 Scaglietti and modified it to create the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti Sessanta.

As we said, only 60 of these cars were ever built, so they are rather rare. Add in the fact that this bad boy was a whopping $424,480 in 2007 and you can tell that these cars were built for the true collector. If you are a true collector of Ferrari’s and would like to own one that very well may be the Ferrari to own in the next 20 to 30 years, this Sessanta is a safe bet.

F.C. Kerbeck, a dealer of luxury vehicles, is now offering you the opportunity to own one of these rare machines, as they have one up for sale in their showroom and on Ebay.

Click past the jump to read our full review on this vehicle.

Read more
1953 Ferrari 375 MM Spider by Pininfarina

1953 Ferrari 375 MM Spider by Pininfarina

In the 1950s, car racing was nowhere near what it has become today. The majority of the cars on road circuits were more about how good the driver was and how well the car was tuned. This meant that the majority of the cars were lightweight and only had between 200 and 250 horsepower. Having said that, there always has to be some sort of exception and the exception here is the 1953 Ferrari 375 MM Spider and RM Auctions has one set to go to auction on May 12th, 2012.

The Ferrari 375 MM Spider managed to completely dominate the World Sports Car Championship between 1954 and 1957, winning a total of 11 races and having seven more podium appearances (top 3 or 4 places). It also won two national championships in Argentina in 1954 and 1955.

In 1957, the car was retired following a crash. Post-retirement someone managed to get a hold of this storied racer, pulled out the Italian V-12 and dropped in a U.S.-built V-8 engine, which really seems pointless to us. After the V-8 muscle went into it, this once famed roadster just disappeared from automotive history.

In 1983, this American-powered Ferrari resurfaced and made its way back to home. In Italy, Count Zanon di Valsiurata repaired the image of this car by reinstalling its Italian power plant and restoring it to an acceptable condition.

How does this one-time powerhouse of the WSC and 1 of 15 Pininfarina examples ever built stand up to 2012 standards?

Click past the jump to find out.

Read more