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1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

Maranello’s answer to the Porsche 911

In 1968, Ferrari had been on the market as a road car manufacturer for 21 years and was already enjoying massive success. It had already won the Formula One championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans and launched iconic cars like the 250 GTO, 275 GTB, and the 400 Superamerica. However, the cars were very expensive, and Ferrari was looking for a shot at the more affordable sports car market. And it created the Dino for this exact purpose.

Launched in 1968, the first Dino was called the 206 GT. Powered by a 2.0-liter V-6, it was designed by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti and produced until 1969. The Dino was updated in 1969 and renamed the 246 GT. A convertible model called the GTS was also introduced. The original Dino was phased out in 1974, but a redesigned model called the 308 GT4 was launched in 1973 and kept into production until 1980. That’s when the Dino brand was dropped altogether, and Ferrari’s next affordable sports car was called the Mondial.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Dino 206 GT.

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2018 Ferrari Dino

2018 Ferrari Dino

The Dino brand, created by Ferrari for models with engines with fewer than 12 cylinders, spanned from 1968 to 1976, and included cars such as the iconic 246 GTS. Now it looks like Ferrari is going to resurrect the name for an entry-level sports car. Rumors about Ferrari planning to develop a V-6-powered sports car have been flying around for some years now. It took Maranello a lot to admit such a model is underway, but Sergio Marchionne finally came clean in June 2015, telling Autocar that a V-6 Ferrari is "not a question of if but when." Two months have passed since then and our spy photographers caught a 458-based mule in the wild. According to them, the car didn’t sound like the usual V-8. What’s more, the mule was followed by a 488 that didn’t sound like it was using a turbocharged V-8 either, but rather the turbo V-6 used in the newly revealed 2016 Alfa Romeo Giulia QV.

Could this mean that Ferrari is finally testing the sports car that will revive the Dino nameplate? This seems to be the likely scenario, especially since the 458 mule sports a number of features hinting toward a new exterior design and a different powerplant.

Of course, we’re nearly three years away from seeing the real deal in the metal and it will probably take at least 12 months until we get to see a pre-production body on that mule, but that won’t stop me from speculating what this Ferrari might bring to the market. Keep reading for the full details.

Updated 10/01/2015: According to AutoCar, Ferrari just filled patents for its upcoming V6-powered Dino sports car. The new drawings reveal that the 2018 Dino will be a "convertible car with a rigid sunroof and a front engine." So apparently, the upcoming Dino will feature a retractable roof - just like the 488 Spider and will get the same 3.0-litre V-6 engine used in the Alfa Giulia.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2018 Ferrari Dino.

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1966 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars

1966 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars

While most of us are still waiting for Ferrari to bring back the legendary Dino name, the classic version is still breaking hearts. One of the only 18 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyders to be produced has been auctioned by RM Auctions in Monaco for an amazing €2,520,000, or about $3,155,000 at the current exchange rates.

The Ferrari Dino 206 S was unveiled in February 1966 and was aimed to race the FIA’s 2-liter Group 4 class against the most powerful of Porsche models. The Dino was up for the task using a 65 degree V-6 engine that had been conceived by Dino Ferrari himself.

Shortly after its debut, the Dino 206 S proved what an amazing car it really was: it earned a 2nd place finish at the Targo Florio, 2nd and 3rd at the Nurburgring, and a 6th place finish at Spa. Then, in June 1967 with Richard Attwood and David Piper behind the wheel, it scored another impressive result, this time in the 1,000 Kilometer Nurburgring race: 6th place overall and 1st in class.

Hit the jump to read more about the Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars.

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1969 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GT

1969 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GT

An icon from Maranello

Throughout its history, Ferrari has made cars for a variety of reasons – to win races, to outdo its competitors, or to simply show off. The Dino, however, is unique. Named after Enzo Ferrari’s son, Alfredo “Dino” Ferrari, who died in 1956 due to muscular dystrophy at the age of 24, the Dino is part tribute and part experiment, marking a variety of firsts for the famed Italian sports car maker. However, for the first eight years it was in production, the Dino was separated from the core Ferrari brand, offering a lower entry fee paired with a V-6 (and later, V-8) engine mounted in the middle.

Arguably one of greatest (if not the greatest motivation) behind the Dino’s creation was Ferrari’s ambition to make something that could take on the venerable Porsche 911. While the Prancing Horse’s V-12 models were faster overall, they were also significantly more expensive, so the Dino was put forth as a way of pulling in customers looking for an alternative to Stuttgart’s darling.

The result of all these pressures is unquestionably one of the greatest Ferrari models of all time – even though it’s not really a Ferrari.

Continue reading to learn more about the Dino.

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1972 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS

1972 - 1974 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS

Topless thrills for an Italian icon

When it was first built, the rear/mid-engine Dino sports car promised the same thrilling experience behind the wheel as any other machine with a Prancing Horse badge on the nose, but for a significantly lower price of admission. By the time the Dino 246 GT rolled out of Maranello, it was more than obvious that that mission was a complete and utter success. As such, a roofless iteration was quickly drafted up, and thus, the Dino 246 GTS was born. All the important bits, like the 2.4-liter V-6, independent suspension, and drop-dead gorgeous styling remained unaltered, but up top, you could find an additional 300 miles of blue-sky goodness.

These days, the Dino is one of the most sought-after Ferrari models on the planet, with some examples of the 246 GTS easily breaking the half-million dollar mark. The car is a wonderful thing to behold, and stands as a critical milestone in Ferrari’s long history.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Dino 246 GTS.

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1973 - 1980 Ferrari Dino 308 GT4

1973 - 1980 Ferrari Dino 308 GT4

With the huge success of the Dino 246 GT/GTS, Ferrari also decided to bring a 2+2 version of the car. And in 1972 at the Paris Motor Show Ferrari unveiled the 308 GT4 model. It was Ferrari’s first V-8 production model, and also the first mid-engined 2+2 model.

The 308 GT4 models were given chassis numbers in the particular Dino even number series, which they maintained even when being produced alongside the true 246 GT/GTS replacement, the 308 GTB/GTS series, which had chassis numbers in the standard Ferrari road car odd-number sequence. The production period lasted for seven years, until 1980, when it was superseded by the Mondial 8 model.

The car was designed by Bertone and featured a controversial styling at first, due to its angular lines, like the boomerang shaped air intakes on the sail panels that bordered the rear quarter glass, and the tunnel effect of the inner sail panels to the flat vertical rear screen. The left side intake ducted cooling air to the oil radiator, and the right side one ducted air to the carburettor air filter. The overall shape was very tight and well balanced, and has stood the test of time very well, certainly better than some of its contemporaries.

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1975 - 1980 Ferrari Dino 208 GT4

1975 - 1980 Ferrari Dino 208 GT4

The Ferrari Dino 208 GT4 is the smaller version of the 308 GT4 that was revealed at the 1973 Paris Auto Salon. The Ferrari was specially designed for the Italian market, because in those days taxation was particularly heavy on cars with engines above 2 liters, and remained in production from 1975 to 1980, with a total of 840 units receiving Maranello’s stamp of approval.

As this was a specific market model for the Italian market, all were produced with a left hand drive configuration. Just like most Ferraris that came before in the Dino lineup, the numbers in the car’s name refer to the engine’s total cubic capacity as well as the number of cylinders, in this case the Dino is powered by a 2.0 Liter V8, with the figure 4 relating to the Dino’s 2+2 layout offering space for up to four passengers.

Continued after the jump.

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2009 Ferrari Dino

2009 Ferrari Dino

Despite Ferrari’s denials, spy photographers already caught test-mules of the upcoming Dino. Powered by a V8 engine, Dino will be the most affordable model Ferrari ever did. With a price tag of about $170.000, Dino will compete with models like Porsche 911 Turbo, Audi R8 and Lamborghini Gallardo. The new 2+2 Coupe will be unveiled at the 2008 Paris Motor Show or at the 2009 Detroit Auto Show.

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1968 - 1969 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

1968 - 1969 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

In 1968, Ferrari had been on the market as a road car manufacturer for 21 years and was already enjoying massive success. It had already won the Formula One championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans and launched iconic cars like the 250 GTO, 275 GTB, and the 400 Superamerica. However, the cars were very expensive, and Ferrari was looking for a shot at the more affordable sports car market. And it created the Dino for this exact purpose.

Launched in 1968, the first Dino was called the 206 GT. Powered by a 2.0-liter V-6, it was designed by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti and produced until 1969. The Dino was updated in 1969 and renamed the 246 GT. A convertible model called the GTS was also introduced. The original Dino was phased out in 1974, but a redesigned model called the 308 GT4 was launched in 1973 and kept into production until 1980. That’s when the Dino brand was dropped altogether, and Ferrari’s next affordable sports car was called the Mondial.

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1967 - 1980 Ferrari Dino

1967 - 1980 Ferrari Dino

In the late 1960’s through the 1970’s Ferrari produced the Dino series - the 206, 246 and 308, for a total of approximately 7,750 Dinos.
Enzo Ferrari use the name in honour of his only son,Alfredo Dino Ferrari who died in 1956 from muscular dystrophy.

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