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A Drove of Prancing Horses are Are Set To Invade the Big Apple

A Drove of Prancing Horses are Are Set To Invade the Big Apple

Italian automaker will cap off its year-long 70th anniversary celebration in NYC

It’s not exactly a scene from The Planet of the Apes, though it might as well be now that it’s been confirmed that an animal invasion is about to take place in New York City from October 7 to October 8. No, monkeys aren’t coming to the Big Apple to take a bite of it. Prancing horses are coming, and they’re coming en masse for the party of a lifetime to celebrate Ferrari’s 70th anniversary.

The wall-to-wall celebration is taking place all over Manhattan, capping off a global celebration that has literally spanned more than a year. That’s how Ferrari rolls, people. Where others do celebrate anniversaries in one location, the Scuderia does it in over 50 countries, the last stop of which will be right smack in the US in an event called “Driven By Emotion: Ferrari Through The Decades.” As part of the festivities, Ferrari will set up a total of five different exhibits throughout the city, including “Through The Decades” at Rockefeller Plaza. Those who get the chance to go to this exhibit will get to see one Ferrari car per decade, in addition of course to seeing the Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta in the flesh. Four more locations will host other Prancing Horses as according to Ferrari, 26 of the company’s most iconic models will be on display in any one of the five locations throughout New York City. Check out the teaser video of the event to get an idea of what to expect and head over past the jump to find out where else in Manhattan exhibits will be opened.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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1987 - 1992 Ferrari F40

1987 - 1992 Ferrari F40

The 201 mph Ferrari F40 is unlike all other supercars: every year that passes, its stunning exterior design and brutal turbocharged power delivery seem even more appealing. In the new-is-best world of supercar ownership, the lasting and growing influence of this 30-year-old exotic is quite unique.

The F40 legend started with a bang as the final car to be presented by Enzo himself on the year of his death. Rows and rows of the matching Rosso Corsa red F40’s lined the Fiorano pit area with another key figure in Ferrari lore: a young Luca Di Montezemolo smiling in his 1980s power suit next to this line of exotica.

As much a story about the passionate men and women behind the scenes, there is almost nothing boring about the F40 in any way. Originally set for a 399-unit production run, the total swelled to more than 1,200 over the car’s lifetime from 1987 to 1992.

The F40’s shocking looks and speed are appreciating in value steadily, and may one day even overtake the Ferrari NART Sypder’s $27 million dollar auction record from this past weekend.

Until then, this Ferrari is already one for the ages. It is as much a joy to drive as it is to admire, almost like a fine painting — new details emerge and captivate the mind. Collectors are notoriously fastidious when it comes to flogging their prized investment, but the F40 is no show queen.

The F40 can dance. The mid-mounted V-8 engine’s then-state-of-the-art twin turbochargers power just the rear wheels through an 8-ball billiard gear knob and the classic polished H-gate pattern.

Weighing more than 500 pounds less than its arch rival — the Porsche 959 — the Ferrari F40 slams its driver toward any horizon at light speed (once those parallel IHI turbochargers spool up).

Updated 08/10/2015: A 1992 Ferrari F40 was auctioned this past weekend for a record €1.12 million ($1.22 million) at Coys auction at the 43rd AVD Oldtimer Grand Prix in Nurburgring, Germany. This amount represents a record for the F40, but it may not come at such a big surprise, considering it was the last model signed by Enzo Ferrari.

Click past the jump for the full review of the 1987 - 1992 Ferrari F40, arguably the absolute pinnacle of supercar design and influence.

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Video: XCar Reviews The Ferrari F40

Video: XCar Reviews The Ferrari F40

The Ferrari F40 is known for three major feats: It was the company’s final turbocharged car until the California T was introduced in 2014, it’s the last Ferrari approved by Mr. Enzo himself, and it’s an important piece in Maranello’s line of range-topping supercars, a car the Enzo and LaFerrari pay homage to. But there is more to the F40 story, especially as far as development goes. Although Ferrari never intended to race the F40, the supercar eventually made its track debut in 1989 at Laguna Seca. It was a natural fit as the F40 was actually based on a race car. More specifically, on the Group B rally evolution of its predecessor, the 288 GTO.

In 1984, as soon as Porsche started racing 959-spec version of the 911 — soon to become a road-legal supercar — Ferrari had begun development of a Group B version of the 288 GTO. Dubbed Evoluzione, this extreme iteration of the GTO arrived a bit late to the party, as the FIA axed the Group B category for the 1986 season. The Italians were left with five Evoluzione prototype and no series to put them to good use in. Unlike other manufacturers, who modified their Group B cars to compete in other racing series, Ferrari used the Evoluzione development cars to build the F40. The end result was the fastest, most powerful, and most expensive car that Ferrari sold to the public up to 1987, and the spectacular supercar we all know today.

Although it’s been 24 years since the F40 was discontinued, the F50’s predecessor continues to enjoy the massive attention it gets from automotive outlets. The folks over at EVO drove one in the Swiss Alps earlier in 2014, while XCAR showcased it with help from John Pogson, one of the very few people to race the F40. Now, XCAR is back to pay yet another tribute to Ferrari’s brilliant machine with the same driver in the spotlight. Hit the play button for 17 minutes of F40 goodness.

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Luca Di Montezemolo's 5 Greatest Moments and 5 Greatest Cars at Ferrari

Luca Di Montezemolo’s 5 Greatest Moments and 5 Greatest Cars at Ferrari

Luca di Montezemolo has become a legend in the automotive industry. He was the man that helped lead a failing Ferrari into record profits, unsurpassed sales, and record-setting Formula One performances. Now after 23 years as the president of the Prancing Horse brand, Luca is stepping down next month. Thanks to differences between him and Sergio Marchionne, the head of Ferrari parent company Fiat, Luca has decided that his time with the Italian automaker needs to come to an end.

To celebrate what he has accomplished, I have compiled a small list of some of the memorable things that happened to the company while he was at the helm, as well as looking at five of the greatest cars that Ferrari produced during his tenure.

Feel free to comment with your thoughts on his leaving the company, your favorite Ferrari from the Montezemolo era, as well as your favorite Ferrari memories and moments. Let’s send this great man off with a celebration of what he has accomplished.

You will be missed.

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Video: Petrolicious Pays Tribute to the 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

Video: Petrolicious Pays Tribute to the 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

There are literally a handful of cars in the history of the industry that’s revered more than the Ferrari 250 GTO. Really, you can probably count in one hand those models and we’re guessing you’re even going to have a hard time doing it. Such is the level of respect people have of this true classic. Consider how much a 250 GTO fetches in auctions these days. Last November, a variation of the 250 GTO - the 250 LM - sold for $14.3 million. But even that pales in comparison to the incredible $52 million price Connecticut-based collector Paul Pappalardo paid for a 1963 250 GTO. So yeah, unless there’s a DeLorean out there that actually flies, no car today - classic or modern - will even come close to sniffing that record purchase.

So imagine what it must have felt for Petrolicious to get its hands on a 250 GTO. In this video, Derek Hill, the son of former Formula One champion and Ferrari factory driver Phil HIll, managed to acquire a 1964 250 GTO. We can only wonder what it must have felt like to be entrusted with a car that probably has a higher value that the GDP of some countries. But if anybody understood the value of this car, it’s Hill. After all, his father actually raced this exact 250 GTO at the Daytona Continental, which the older Hill ended up winning.

You really can’t understate the rarity of this particular GTO, chassis #5571. It’s actually one of the last GTOs ever built and was also the first of the Series II bodies and it came with a 3.0-liter V-12 engine that produces 300 horsepower.

Not that we’re pining for it to hit any kind of auction in the future, but can you imagine how much it would fetch in a setting like that? It’s not just a 250 GTO; it’s a 250 GTO with a real racing history attached to it.

North of $50 million? We’d be fools not to at least consider it.

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The Story Behind the LaFerrari and its F150-Badged Steering Wheel

The Story Behind the LaFerrari and its F150-Badged Steering Wheel

If you have paid attention to all the new videos and reviews of the new LaFerrari you may have noticed something awkward on the car’s steering wheel. There is a tiny badge that reads "F150." You can see it here in our screengrab from Sport Auto’s LaFerrari video.

The badge itself is to signify the car’s internal code designation, and to pay homage to the cars of Ferrari’s past.

Let us start with the past. The very first true Ferrari supercar of the modern era was the Ferrari F40. It was name the F40 as the car was built to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the company. Then when its successor arrived, it received the name F50. Not because it was Ferrari’s 50th birthday, but rather, 50 is bigger than 40. That trend continued again with the Ferrari Enzo, which had a designation of F60. Now when the LaFerrari was first in production, most people simply referred to it as the F70, so where the hell did the F150 come from?

That is a slightly different nod to history. You see, a long time ago, Italy was not a unified country. It wasn’t until 1861, and after much bloodshed, that the Kingdom of Italy became a united constituency. In 2011, Ferrari named its F1 car the F150 to celebrate 150 years of Italian unity. After some legal troubles with Ford over the name, the car became known as the Ferrari 150° Italia. Since the LaFerrari was under development at a similar time, it seems very obvious why Ferrari chose the "F150" code for the car.

You learn something new every day, eh?

Click past the jump to read a little more about the Ferrari LaFerrari

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Ferrari Celebrates 30th Anniversary in Hong Kong

Ferrari Celebrates 30th Anniversary in Hong Kong

Very few automakers throw a celebration quite like Ferrari.

This year, the iconic Italian automaker celebrated its 30th anniversary in Hong Kong, and true to form, it organized quite an event to ring in the celebrations.

The pictures paint the story, fellas. Those are over 600 Ferraris, ranging from old-time classics to the latest releases, all converging at the Asia World Expo in Lantau island, to commemorate Ferrari’s 30th anniversary in the Chinese territory.

To add prestige to the event, Ferrari chairman Luca di Montezemolo was in attendance to lead the celebration that included some of the most iconic Ferraris in existence, including the Dino, the 195 Inter, and the 365 GTS. Modern Ferraris were also in attendance, including the 458 Challenge, 599XX and the FXX Evoluzione.

The event also gave Ferrari the opportunity to unveil its latest offering, the 458 Speciale, which was unveiled by F1 test driver Marc Gene.

Congratulations to Ferrari on its 30th anniversary in Hong Kong. Here’s to more years of success in the Chinese territory.

Click past the jump to read about the 2014 Ferrari 458 Speciale

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

The record-shattering $27 million dollar auction price of the ultra-rare 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider is making waves through the entire classic car scene.

Never before has such a late-model Ferrari earned such totals - which are typically the preserve of the 250 series from pre-1964.

What makes this gorgeous Ferrari so much more valuable than the thousands of other classic Ferrari’s seeking new homes? How did the price of this single model nearly double the $14 million dollar average price - excluding this giant total - when any of these 10 cherished models have changed hands in the past?

Part of what makes this NART Spider so valuable is the car’s unique blend of the gorgeous late-1950s Ferrari styling and advanced mechancials. The GTB/4S upgrades dramatically increased the performance and handling of this V-12 supercar. Almost the entire Maranello racing technology suite was applied to the NART Spider - allowing it to be a posh cruiser that was also capable of serious speed on a racetrack.

The V-12’s quad overhead camshafts were a first on a road car, while the rear-mounted transaxle, limited-slip diff and independent rear suspension were all huge advancements that were offered first in the NART Spider.

Ferrari never looked back from all the new technology introduced on the NART Spider. At the same time, the NART is especially sentimental because Ferrari would not make make such an emotionally-styled road car again for decades. The 365 GTB/4 Daytona was 1967’s new hot style and Ferrari followed the money trail by ending 275 production.

Little did they know, the layers of exclusivity and special editions that helped create this this NART Spider would make it the most valuable road car ever sold. Ever.

Click past the jump for the full review of this timeless classic Ferrari, with details on the technology and style of this model during its 10-unit production run in 1967.

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Ferrari opens Museum to pay tribute to Sergio Pininfarina

Ferrari opens Museum to pay tribute to Sergio Pininfarina

For true Ferrari enthusiasts that are planning to visit Italy during the Winter holidays, Ferrari has a treat in store for you.

Ferrari has opened an exhibition to pay tribute to the late Sergio Pininfarina and the not-to-be-forgotten Pinin Farina, by showcasing every model that has been designed by the man himself and his team. The idea behind the exhibition is to show the public the exemplary creations that came out from the Pininfarina drawing board. The exhibition includes 11 models that are divided between the front-engined berlinettas, such as the 1964 275 GTB4 and the Spider version of the legendary Daytona, the mid-rear-engined models, notably the milestone BB, and the contemporary creative evolution which encompasses, amongst others, the Testarossa and the 599 SA Aperta, the latter a homage by Ferrari to Sergio and Andrea Pininfarina. The highlight of the exhibition is the famous Modulo concept which previously was an unseen exhibit from the Pininfarina family’s private and company collections.

This exhibition was opened on October 27th and it will remain open until January 7th, 2013. So, anybody who is going to Europe, or Italy in that matter, can visit that museum before January 7th and behold the Italian passion that emanates from every single Pininfarina-designed Ferrari on display.

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1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

The newest Ferrari in the Sherman Wolf estate that is up for auction at Pebble Beach on August 18th and 19th, 2012 is this 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO. The 288 GTO saw very limited production, as its models were only produced to allow homologation into FIA Group B Series. To get into this series, Ferrari had to build at least 200 models, but went a little further and created 272 examples.

FIA canceled the series, which resulted in the 288 GTO becoming a road car that was sold to the public. This 288 GTO example only has two previous owners, Wolf and Ronald Stern, and boasts just 6,000 miles. The body is coated in a bright red that looks like it just rolled off of the showroom floor, though there is no mention of a restoration.

Behind the driver sits a 2.8-liter V-8 engine that boasts a pair of IHI turbochargers and Weber-Mareli fuel injection. This engine pumps out 395 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 366 pound-feet of torque at 3,800 rpm. From 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph), the 288 GTO takes only 4.8 seconds. Add on an additional 4.4 seconds and you are at 160 km/h (100 mph). It runs the 1/4-mile in just 12.7 seconds and has a top speed of 305 km/h (190 mph).

On the front and rear, you get independent double-wishbone suspensions with coil springs. In addition, you also get 225/50R16 high-performance tires on the front, 255/50R16 tires on the rear, and vented disc brakes all the way around.

Gooding & Company expects this Ferrari to pull in between $750,000 and $900,000 at auction.

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

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1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

The Ferrari California Spider alone is one of the most desirable Ferraris and sports cars in the world. This 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione, which belonged to the late Sherman Wolf, is an even more desirable model, as it is one of nine examples that boast an all-alloy body and a long wheelbase. That rarity is something that will drive this car to between the $7 and $9 million mark.

This sample was actually the first Ferrari that the famed collector owned, and made its way to Wolf after first being owned by George Reed. Wolf also ran this Ferrari in the first ever Colorado Grand, just adding more to its storied history.

On the mechanical side, this 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione boasts full competition specifications. It has an outside plug motor that has TR heads resting on top of it, 4-wheel disc brakes, velocity stacks, and a ribbed gearbox to help keep it cool. The engine is a 2,953 cc V-12 with three Weber carbs mounted atop it and a 9.8-to-1 compression ratio. It punches out 280 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 203 pound-feet of torque at 5,500 rpm.

The body is draped in a medium shade of red and was fully restored by Ferrari specialist, David Carte. The wheels are the factory-style wires and the headlights boast the full-racing covers to help add to the car’s aerodynamic look.

This 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione is being offered up at the Pebble Beach Auction on August 18th and 19th, 2012 by Gooding & Company. It is one of four Ferraris owned by the Wolf estate that are up for auction in Pebble Beach.

UPDATE 08/20/2012: The Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione has just set a record at Monterey for all-time high price. The classic, drop-top sports car was auctioned off for a whopping $11,275,000! Someone really wanted that car!

Updated 12/27/2013: A Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider will be put on auction by RM Auctions in Arizona on Friday, January 17, 2014. The car is expected to fetch around $7-9 millions!

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

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Ferrari North Europe Setting out to Reclaim its Parade of Ferraris Record

Ferrari North Europe Setting out to Reclaim its Parade of Ferraris Record

World records are a funny thing, because you can easily set something just by thinking up a new thing that no one else has. Once you do it, you’re the record holder, until someone else does it. Ferrari of North Europe did something of that sort in 2007 by setting the Guinness world record for number of Ferraris in a Parade, which ended up being 385 cars.

The record was broken recently with a total of 490 cars and Ferrari North Europe plans on reclaiming this title in September. Ferrari has already accumulated more than enough entrants (600) to beat the record, but it wants to make it stick by hitting the 1,000-entrant mark. The event will take place at Ferrari Racing Days at Silverstone Circuit on September 15th and 16th.

Ferrari owners get into the Ferrari Racing Day event free of charge and can even register for the Guinness word record attempt by clicking here.

The rules of the world record attempt are pretty straightforward. The cars must travel over a distance of more than 2 miles with a distance of no more than two car lengths between each other. Simple enough, huh?

So, not only can you get free tickets for taking part in the record-setting event, but you can be forever be recognized as part of a world record in Guinness – whatever that’s worth these days. Either way, the Ferrari racing days event is always a blast, and getting free entry makes it all the better.

Click past the jump to read Ferrari’s full press release on the matter.

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1964 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso Berlinetta

1964 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso Berlinetta

The Ferrari 250 GT lineup was a direct spawn of the 250 racers from the 1950s. In 1954, the first of the 250 GTs, the 250 Europa GT, came into existence, bearing a 217-horsepower V-12 engine and a long racing bloodline. The 259 GT line was neither a long-lived nor mass produced product, as it only lasted one decade and a fairly limited production number.

In 1962, Ferrari released a new version of the 250 GT, which was dubbed the 250 GT Lusso, “Lusso” meaning “Luxury.” The 250 GT/L is one of the more rare Ferraris in the world today, as only 350 models were ever built and the number of surviving models is not readily available.

If you have ever wanted to own one of these particularly rare machines, now is the time to act, as RM Auctions is offering a 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta up for sale in Monaco on May 11th and 12th, 2012. Not only is this an extremely rare model, but it was the 4th from the last one ever manufactured.

You may be wondering how well this 48-year-old Ferrari is holding up to the test of time.

Click past the jump to find out.

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1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Spider

1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Spider

Ferrari has always had a famed bloodline of racecars, but few hold the amount of clout of the 1957 625 TRC Spider. There were only two of this famed roadster ever built, chassis 0680 MDTR and 0672 MDTR. If you so happen to have a large chunk of money laying around, you can own a piece of racing history in the form of chassis 0680 MDTR, as RM Auctions has just listed it for their 2012 auction in Monaco.

In August of 1957, this Ferrari and its owner, Johnny von Neumann, ventured to Austria, Germany and took 1st place in its class in just its first time on the track. In its second race, at Laguna Seca, the 625 TRC took 2nd place. In all of the 11 races it ran in the 1957 to 1958 season, this Ferrari took 1st place three times, and landed in second or third place four times. It continued on to have a prolific career, even in vintage races all the way up to 2011 Montery Historic Races.

UPDATE 0516/2012: The 1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Spider was sold in Monaco for a staggering €5,040,000, or about $6.4 million, a record for this particular model. This was the first time in 30 years that this model was available for auction and it is one of the only two models ever built.

Read the full review after the jump.

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1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino Replica: Real Enough for My Dollar

1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino Replica: Real Enough for My Dollar

The 1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino is one of the rarest cars in the world, as Ferrari only built a total of 18 of these sweet machines. Well, the rarer the car, the more likely enthusiasts are to start replicating them, so seeing a replica of this famous car is to be expected. However, a high-quality replica is much less common.

A recent beauty popped up on eBay and it is likely one of the best recreations of a classic Ferrari we have ever seen. This replica 1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino is about as close to 100% perfect as you can get. It has a custom-built alloy body with a 1,987 cc V-6 engine from a Ferrari Dino 206 GT. It may not crank out the 215 horsepower that the 206 SP’s 1,999 cc engine cranked, but the Dino 206 GT’s engine was rated at a respectable 176 horsepower (1967 model year). Driving this mid-mounted engine’s power to the rear wheels is a magnesium gearbox, which is likely a five-speed configuration.

Being the party poopers that we are, we had to examine this replica closely and see what differences we could find between it and the original. The first thing that stands out is the parked positioning of the wiper blade. The replica’s wiper blade is parked on the driver’s side of the vehicle. On the original, the wiper blade parks almost in the middle of the windshield.

The second thing is that the cutout in front of the windshield is several inches too close to the windshield. The original 206 SP Dino’s cutout is at least 8 inches from the windshield and the replica’s cutout is about 3 inches from the windshield.

Lastly, the driver’s side window frame on the original is unpainted, whereas the replica’s is painted red. All of that said, for a starting bid of “only” $89,100, this is not a bad deal, given an original 206 SP Dino fetched $3,267,000 at an auction in 2007.

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Enzo Ferrari Museum officially opens in Modena, Italy

Enzo Ferrari Museum officially opens in Modena, Italy

It took a lot longer than we all expected, but finally, one of the most famous names in the history of the auto industry now has a museum to call its own.

Enzo Ferrari, the founding father of the brand that we have come to know as Ferrari, has his own museum called the "Museo Casa Enzo Ferrari." The museum was built in Modena, Italy - the town where Enzo Ferrari himself was born - and cost a ridiculous sum of €18 million - $23.6 million based on current exchange rates - that was mostly funded by local leaders in Modena in an effort to drive up tourism in the area.

Spearheading the building of the museum was renowned architect, Jan Kaplicky, who began the project in 2003. Unfortunately, Kaplicky passed on in 2009, leaving the project in the hands of Andrea Morgante, a former colleague in the design firm, Future Systems.

The building covers 54,000 square feet of floor space and will feature plenty of exhibits, including a gallery of classic Ferraris, historical artifacts, and memorabilia. There will also be a significant amount of space allotted to Enzo Ferrari’s own personal belongings, as well as a variety of never-before-seen documents and drawings that encompass the rich and storied racing history of Modena, Italy.

Despite not being an officially licensed project by Ferrari itself, the Museo Casa Enzo Ferrari is still expected to draw throngs of visitors. The museum is open every day with the only exception being Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. The doors open from 9:30 am to 6:00 pm or 7:00 pm depending on the calendar date.

Hit the jump for details on the Enzo Ferrari Museum’s first exhibit.

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Sergio Scaglietti passes away at 91

Sergio Scaglietti passes away at 91

It has been confirmed that late last night, the world lost a true genius in the art of car design. Sergio Scaglietti, the man behind the designs of the 1957 250 California Spider, 1958 250 Testa Rossa, and 1962 250 GTO, among others, has passed away. He was 91 years old.

Sergio Scaglietti doesn’t need too much of an introduction in the eyes of Ferrari lovers. He started his work in 1951 when he opened Carrozzeria Scaglietti - an Italian automobile design and coachbuilding company. The coachbuilder was located just across the road from Ferrari in Maranello, where the great Enzo Ferrari took notice of the talented designer. Scaglietti was one of the few designers that gained Enzo Ferrari’s trust and respect both through his bodywork and design skills. Scaglietti of course started designing cars for Ferrari, and was even honored with a few cars named after him, such as the 612 Scaglietti and 456M GT Scaglietti.

"He was one of my father’s best friends," said Piero Ferrari. "He was next to me with Marco Piccinini also the day my father died and stayed with me the whole night until the funeral. I loved him and he was a very important part of my life. The world is emptier without Sergio."

After a lifetime of dedication to the designing of vehicles, Sergio Scaglietti passed away at his home in Modena. The world has undoubtedly lost an automotive icon. We have great respect for his work and send our condolences to his family.

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