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1987 - 1992 Ferrari F40

1987 - 1992 Ferrari F40

The 201 mph Ferrari F40 is unlike all other supercars: every year that passes, its stunning exterior design and brutal turbocharged power delivery seem even more appealing. In the new-is-best world of supercar ownership, the lasting and growing influence of this 30-year-old exotic is quite unique.

The F40 legend started with a bang as the final car to be presented by Enzo himself on the year of his death. Rows and rows of the matching Rosso Corsa red F40’s lined the Fiorano pit area with another key figure in Ferrari lore: a young Luca Di Montezemolo smiling in his 1980s power suit next to this line of exotica.

As much a story about the passionate men and women behind the scenes, there is almost nothing boring about the F40 in any way. Originally set for a 399-unit production run, the total swelled to more than 1,200 over the car’s lifetime from 1987 to 1992.

The F40’s shocking looks and speed are appreciating in value steadily, and may one day even overtake the Ferrari NART Sypder’s $27 million dollar auction record from this past weekend.

Until then, this Ferrari is already one for the ages. It is as much a joy to drive as it is to admire, almost like a fine painting — new details emerge and captivate the mind. Collectors are notoriously fastidious when it comes to flogging their prized investment, but the F40 is no show queen.

The F40 can dance. The mid-mounted V-8 engine’s then-state-of-the-art twin turbochargers power just the rear wheels through an 8-ball billiard gear knob and the classic polished H-gate pattern.

Weighing more than 500 pounds less than its arch rival — the Porsche 959 — the Ferrari F40 slams its driver toward any horizon at light speed (once those parallel IHI turbochargers spool up).

Updated 08/10/2015: A 1992 Ferrari F40 was auctioned this past weekend for a record €1.12 million ($1.22 million) at Coys auction at the 43rd AVD Oldtimer Grand Prix in Nurburgring, Germany. This amount represents a record for the F40, but it may not come at such a big surprise, considering it was the last model signed by Enzo Ferrari.

Click past the jump for the full review of the 1987 - 1992 Ferrari F40, arguably the absolute pinnacle of supercar design and influence.

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

The record-shattering $27 million dollar auction price of the ultra-rare 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider is making waves through the entire classic car scene.

Never before has such a late-model Ferrari earned such totals - which are typically the preserve of the 250 series from pre-1964.

What makes this gorgeous Ferrari so much more valuable than the thousands of other classic Ferrari’s seeking new homes? How did the price of this single model nearly double the $14 million dollar average price - excluding this giant total - when any of these 10 cherished models have changed hands in the past?

Part of what makes this NART Spider so valuable is the car’s unique blend of the gorgeous late-1950s Ferrari styling and advanced mechancials. The GTB/4S upgrades dramatically increased the performance and handling of this V-12 supercar. Almost the entire Maranello racing technology suite was applied to the NART Spider - allowing it to be a posh cruiser that was also capable of serious speed on a racetrack.

The V-12’s quad overhead camshafts were a first on a road car, while the rear-mounted transaxle, limited-slip diff and independent rear suspension were all huge advancements that were offered first in the NART Spider.

Ferrari never looked back from all the new technology introduced on the NART Spider. At the same time, the NART is especially sentimental because Ferrari would not make make such an emotionally-styled road car again for decades. The 365 GTB/4 Daytona was 1967’s new hot style and Ferrari followed the money trail by ending 275 production.

Little did they know, the layers of exclusivity and special editions that helped create this this NART Spider would make it the most valuable road car ever sold. Ever.

Click past the jump for the full review of this timeless classic Ferrari, with details on the technology and style of this model during its 10-unit production run in 1967.

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1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

The newest Ferrari in the Sherman Wolf estate that is up for auction at Pebble Beach on August 18th and 19th, 2012 is this 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO. The 288 GTO saw very limited production, as its models were only produced to allow homologation into FIA Group B Series. To get into this series, Ferrari had to build at least 200 models, but went a little further and created 272 examples.

FIA canceled the series, which resulted in the 288 GTO becoming a road car that was sold to the public. This 288 GTO example only has two previous owners, Wolf and Ronald Stern, and boasts just 6,000 miles. The body is coated in a bright red that looks like it just rolled off of the showroom floor, though there is no mention of a restoration.

Behind the driver sits a 2.8-liter V-8 engine that boasts a pair of IHI turbochargers and Weber-Mareli fuel injection. This engine pumps out 395 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 366 pound-feet of torque at 3,800 rpm. From 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph), the 288 GTO takes only 4.8 seconds. Add on an additional 4.4 seconds and you are at 160 km/h (100 mph). It runs the 1/4-mile in just 12.7 seconds and has a top speed of 305 km/h (190 mph).

On the front and rear, you get independent double-wishbone suspensions with coil springs. In addition, you also get 225/50R16 high-performance tires on the front, 255/50R16 tires on the rear, and vented disc brakes all the way around.

Gooding & Company expects this Ferrari to pull in between $750,000 and $900,000 at auction.

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

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1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

The Ferrari California Spider alone is one of the most desirable Ferraris and sports cars in the world. This 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione, which belonged to the late Sherman Wolf, is an even more desirable model, as it is one of nine examples that boast an all-alloy body and a long wheelbase. That rarity is something that will drive this car to between the $7 and $9 million mark.

This sample was actually the first Ferrari that the famed collector owned, and made its way to Wolf after first being owned by George Reed. Wolf also ran this Ferrari in the first ever Colorado Grand, just adding more to its storied history.

On the mechanical side, this 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione boasts full competition specifications. It has an outside plug motor that has TR heads resting on top of it, 4-wheel disc brakes, velocity stacks, and a ribbed gearbox to help keep it cool. The engine is a 2,953 cc V-12 with three Weber carbs mounted atop it and a 9.8-to-1 compression ratio. It punches out 280 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 203 pound-feet of torque at 5,500 rpm.

The body is draped in a medium shade of red and was fully restored by Ferrari specialist, David Carte. The wheels are the factory-style wires and the headlights boast the full-racing covers to help add to the car’s aerodynamic look.

This 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione is being offered up at the Pebble Beach Auction on August 18th and 19th, 2012 by Gooding & Company. It is one of four Ferraris owned by the Wolf estate that are up for auction in Pebble Beach.

UPDATE 08/20/2012: The Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione has just set a record at Monterey for all-time high price. The classic, drop-top sports car was auctioned off for a whopping $11,275,000! Someone really wanted that car!

Updated 12/27/2013: A Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider will be put on auction by RM Auctions in Arizona on Friday, January 17, 2014. The car is expected to fetch around $7-9 millions!

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

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1964 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso Berlinetta

1964 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso Berlinetta

The Ferrari 250 GT lineup was a direct spawn of the 250 racers from the 1950s. In 1954, the first of the 250 GTs, the 250 Europa GT, came into existence, bearing a 217-horsepower V-12 engine and a long racing bloodline. The 259 GT line was neither a long-lived nor mass produced product, as it only lasted one decade and a fairly limited production number.

In 1962, Ferrari released a new version of the 250 GT, which was dubbed the 250 GT Lusso, “Lusso” meaning “Luxury.” The 250 GT/L is one of the more rare Ferraris in the world today, as only 350 models were ever built and the number of surviving models is not readily available.

If you have ever wanted to own one of these particularly rare machines, now is the time to act, as RM Auctions is offering a 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta up for sale in Monaco on May 11th and 12th, 2012. Not only is this an extremely rare model, but it was the 4th from the last one ever manufactured.

You may be wondering how well this 48-year-old Ferrari is holding up to the test of time.

Click past the jump to find out.

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1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Spider

1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Spider

Ferrari has always had a famed bloodline of racecars, but few hold the amount of clout of the 1957 625 TRC Spider. There were only two of this famed roadster ever built, chassis 0680 MDTR and 0672 MDTR. If you so happen to have a large chunk of money laying around, you can own a piece of racing history in the form of chassis 0680 MDTR, as RM Auctions has just listed it for their 2012 auction in Monaco.

In August of 1957, this Ferrari and its owner, Johnny von Neumann, ventured to Austria, Germany and took 1st place in its class in just its first time on the track. In its second race, at Laguna Seca, the 625 TRC took 2nd place. In all of the 11 races it ran in the 1957 to 1958 season, this Ferrari took 1st place three times, and landed in second or third place four times. It continued on to have a prolific career, even in vintage races all the way up to 2011 Montery Historic Races.

UPDATE 0516/2012: The 1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Spider was sold in Monaco for a staggering €5,040,000, or about $6.4 million, a record for this particular model. This was the first time in 30 years that this model was available for auction and it is one of the only two models ever built.

Read the full review after the jump.

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2011 Ferrari 340 Mexico Berlinetta by GWA-Tuning

2011 Ferrari 340 Mexico Berlinetta by GWA-Tuning

The Ferrari 340 Mexico Berlineta is one of the most unique cars on the market, fetching an astounding $4.3 million at RM Auctions in March 2011. That princely sum is justified considering the 340 Mexico was produced in just three examples, each built exclusively for the 1952 Carrera Panamericana race in Mexico. One of these units, chassis number 0224 AT and driven by Luigi Chinetti, was successful in crossing the finish lane in third place behind two Mercedes 300SL Gullwing models. And, this is the car GWA Tuning has chosen to celebrate with a tributary model.

Using a Ferrari 456 platform as a base, GWA Tuning was able to bring the classic 340 Mexico Berlinetta into modern times. This 456 platform was re-bodied by Coach Building master, Mark Nungent, from Australia. The body was then fixed up with a new diffuser, rear spoiler, side vents, and front splitters, all of which came from newer Ferraris. The body was also stretched by about 15 inches (mostly in the middle) to fit the new platform, but the wheelbase remained the same.

Keep reading to learn more about the Ferrari 340 Mexico Berlinetta by GWA-Tuning.

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1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa Prototype

1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa Prototype

Ferrari is not a company that often reuses names, or revives dead nameplates. This is partly because so many of the names of the cars are alphanumeric, but also because Ferrari wants to present each car as new and advanced, and that’s a lot harder to do when you’re recycling names. So when a name does get recycled, it has to be a pretty special one. So even though today the name Testarossa is most closely associated with Ferrari’s flat-12-powered grand tourer from the ’80s and early ’90s, but the name actually goes all of the way back to 1957, with one of the greatest race cars in Ferrari history.

It actually has to be said that the names aren’t actually identical. The racer was named “Testa Rossa” (two words) and the more recent car was the “Testarossa” (one word). This is important because the meaning is slightly different. The words “testa rossa” mean “red head,” and the original 250 TR got the name from its red valve covers. But just as “redhead” as one word in English means a woman with red hair, the Italian name was given to the ’80s car both as a tribute and also with an implied wink.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa Prototype.

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1993 Ferrari FZ93 by Zagato

1993 Ferrari FZ93 by Zagato

Usually we get pretty excited when it comes to one-off models and this time is certainly no different. Back in 1993, Zagato unveiled the Formula Zagato ’93 (FZ93), which would be the main inspiration for the Ferrari Enzo 10 years later. The reason this information is relevant is because the Zagato is now on sale on Mobile.de for 1 million euro, or about $1,400,000 at the current exchange rates.

The Zagato FZ93 was designed by Ercole Spada, the same man who designed the legendary Aston Martin DB4 Zagato and the iconic Alfa Romeo 155. However, despite the fact that both the Alfa Romeo and the Aston Martin models featured impressive design language, the FZ93 is considered to be one of the ugliest Prancing Horses ever with its elongated and block-like nose and disproportionate rear end. The positive thing about this vehicle is its history and its flat 12 engine with an output of 428 HP at 6750 rpm and a peak torque of 362.1 lb-ft at 5500 rpm. The engine is mated to a 5-speed gearbox and sends the power to the rear wheels.

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1952 Ferrari 340 Mexico Coupe

1952 Ferrari 340 Mexico Coupe

Rare automobiles are sought after by various collectors from all over the world and often draw prices exceeding millions of dollars and new Ferrari models have yearlong waiting lists with special approval processes through the factory for anyone to even buy one. The combination of a prestigious moniker and a rare model on the auction block has all the making of a bidding war between these exclusive collectors.

The Ferrari 340 Mexico Coupe is one of three coupe models and the one Barchetta to be produced. They were built exclusively for the 1952 Carrera Panamericana race in Mexico – which was one of the most deadly races in the world. The word rare can be used in some fashion for nearly every Ferrari ever made because the entire company is built around creating unique performance oriented sports cars. Initially, Ferrari only sold road-going cars to pay for the company’s racing exploits and the founder despised having to do so.

Not only is this 340 Mexico Coupe one of three in the world and never produced as a road-going version, it is also the most winning chassis of the three. Complete with original engine and complete history, RM Auctions expects this car to fetch between $2,750,000 and $3,500,000 which leaves most of your ordinary auction-goers out of the picture.

UPDATE 03/15/2011: The 340 Mexico was a HUGE success at the RM Auctions event, pulling in a whopping $4.3 million. The entire event was an even bigger success with a remarkable $24.3 million in total sales and making it the biggest event in it’s 13 year history.

Hit the jump for more details on the 1952 Ferrari 340 Mexico Coupe.

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1968 Ferrari 330 GTC

1968 Ferrari 330 GTC

Ferrari had become a well known racing team and producer of sports cars for the public, but its Gran Touring machines were still lacking refinement. Enzo may have thought little of this, but as time has gone on these larger Ferrari models have done very well for the company and now, with the new FF model, they will introduce 4-wheel drive to the company’s lineup for the first time.

At the 1966 Geneva Motor Show Ferrari introduced its new 330 GTC model. With the 330 GT 2+2 model, Ferrari already had a less sporty car for sale, so the 330 GTC needed to be both Grand Tourer and true performance car. Utilizing a shorter wheelbase and modified engine, the 330 GTC Coupe is widely regarded as one of the best overall Ferrari models of all time.

Canepa Design in California is currently offering a Silver 1965 model with 47,033 miles on the odometer. It has been restored and features a clean title.

Hit the jump for more details on the Ferrari 330 GTC.

Photo Credit: Simon Clay/RM Auctions

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