Ferrari

When you think about Ferrari, you probably think about expensive supercars or exotics that are prized by only the world’s wealthiest buyers. That might be true, but Ferrari – based in Maranello, Italy – is considered one of the finest automakers in the world and the pinnacle of automotive performance. It has a history that dates back to 1939 when Enzo Ferrari founded Auto Avio Costruzioni, which later produced a car in 1940. The general consensus, however, is that Ferrari wasn’t really recognized as the manufacturer that it is today until 1947 when the first Ferrari-badged car was actually completed. Over the years, the company has built a rich motorsport history and now has a lineup that doesn’t only offer high-performance cars but cars that are driver-oriented and usable as daily drivers.

2020 Ferrari 488 Challenge Evo

2020 Ferrari 488 Challenge Evo

There’s a new track beast huffing and puffing in Maranello

Ferrari has just lifted the wraps off its 2020 488 Challenge Evo. The new track-ready speed machine is described as an improvement in aerodynamics first and foremost, with teams now allowed to alter the level of downforce on the front axle independently of the rear axle. On top of that, the Evo comes with a souped-up body kit and looks sharper than ever. Stay close as we walk you through everything you need to know about the 2020 Ferrari 488 Challenge Evo.

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1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

Maybe the most beautiful open-top car that money can buy

The entire Ferrari 250 line seems to have secured its place in the palace of automotive royalties for generations to come. With unmistakable lines, a variety of powerful but also reliable Colombo V-12s, and limited-run production, almost all of the late-50s to early-60s Ferrari 250 models command astronomical values at auction nowadays.

There are, of course, some stars that shine brighter than others, such as the 250 GTO, the 250 GT SWB, and, lastly, the 250 California SWB Spider built between 1960 and 1962. This is one of those short-wheelbase California Spiders but, despite its originality, it lacks the aura of the ex-Alain Delon ’barn find’ that sold for $18.5 million four years ago.

Besides the fact that Alain Delon once owned and thrashed that particular 250 California SWB Spider, what made it even more desirable were its covered headlights. Amazingly, the more sought after variant is, actually, the one Ferrari made more of: a total of 37,250 California SWB Spiders left the factory with covered headlights and just 19 were optioned without the glass over the twin circular headlamps. Read on to learn more about the strange case of a buyer-induced trend that goes against the otherwise untouchable principle of rarity.

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How Much Does a Ferrari Cost?

How Much Does a Ferrari Cost?

None of these models come cheap, in case you didn’t know

It’s no secret that Ferraris are expensive. They’re often considered rolling works of art more than they’re thought of as automobiles. That kind of stature affords Ferrari the space to ask for premium prices for its models. Of course, legacy has something to do with it, too. There’s a reason, after all, that the most expensive car ever sold — it fetched for almost $50 million — is a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO. Thankfully, you don’t have to pay that much to buy a brand-new Ferrari these days, but don’t expect to score one for anything less than $200,000, either. Like most exotic manufacturers, Ferrari charges a premium for its vehicles because these cars are developed with the most advanced technologies in the industry. They’re not just museum-grade pieces; they’re also fast, powerful, and loaded with all the latest tech you can find in the business. Plus, there’s cache that comes with wearing the iconic Prancing Horse badge. So if you’re thinking of buying a Ferrari as your next car purchase, do so with the full understanding that you’re going to have to break the bank to afford one.

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10 Things the Ferrari Purosangue Needs to Take on the Competition

10 Things the Ferrari Purosangue Needs to Take on the Competition

It Is Not An SUV, But It Is A Ferrari Utility Vehicle

Ferrari will build an SUV. I am not joking, the company made an announcement. It will be called the Ferrari Purosangue. That’s the official name of the Ferrari SUV. Ok, Ferrari CEO Louis Camilleri implicitly said that he does not want to hear “that word” in the same sentence with the word Ferrari. “That word” being SUV. Ok, Camilleri, I will not do it. Ever. The new Ferrari... truck… will be the most amazing piece of technology ever attempted with the “that word” layout. Luckily, we do know a thing or two about the new Purosangue.

Digression: Is the word crossover any better? Maybe, but I feel it sounds too soft for the status of a Ferrari. The Honda CR-V is a crossover for crying out loud.

The new Purosangue may take a layout similar to what we have been accustomed to with the onslaught of performance SUVs, yet the Italians promised to make it a proper thoroughbred. Incidentally (not really), Purosangue translated from Italian actually means thoroughbred. Is it just me, or the name Ferrari Thoroughbred (in English) wouldn’t sound bad at all? We have a Superfast and we like it, don’t we? Enough with the strange ideas. Purosangue it is.

Christopher Smith of Motor1 explained how to pronounce it:

“PUR-o-SAN-gue. There are four syllables, with emphasis on PUR and SAN. Phonetically speaking, start with PUR, as in a cat purring. From there just say a soft O as in oh, then SAN with a long A sound like saahn, and finish with GUE, which sounds like way but starting with a g – gway. PURR - oh - SAAHN - gway. See? It’s totally easy.”

OK? OK!

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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

The mid-’60s Ferrari that dreams are made of

The Ferrari 275 GTB is widely considered to be one of the prettiest grand touring cars built during the sizzling ’60s. Displaying an evolutionary design language influenced by Ferrari’s glorious 250-series models such as the 250 GTO and the 250 GTE 2+2, the 275 GTB came in both short-nose and long-nose specification, with the 3.3-liter Colombo V-12 first featuring two overhead camshafts before Ferrari introduced, in 1967, the 275 GTB/4 with four overhead camshafts. This here is a Series II 275 GTB or, in other words, a long-nosed version built towards the end of the GTB’s production run in 1966. It’s one of the last of just a few dozen 275 GTBs with an all-aluminum body shell that makes the car both lighter and rust-proof. Too bad it’s as expensive as a handful of Ferrari F40s.

Even fans of modern supercars and wedge-shaped obscurities from the ’80s would oftentimes come together and agree that the GTs made in the ’60s are a sight to behold: elongated noses, low rooflines, and a tail that usually ends with a stubby Kammback. It’s a well-known recipe and few applied it better than Ferrari. Designed by the house of Pininfarina, by now an integral part of the Maranello-based manufacturer, the 275 GTB came to sweepingly replace all of the 250-series models. It was designed to be more user-friendly, more practical, but without giving up on performance or the unique feeling of being behind the wheel of a Ferrari. Included by many publications on shortlists of the prettiest Ferraris of all time, the 275 GTB was also a successful race car and it also spawned an open-top version in the N.A.R.T.-commissioned 275 GTS/4 Spyders built between 1967 and 1968 (the 275 GTS featured a completely different Pininfarina body while the N.A.R.T. cars featured Scaglietti bodies in the style of Pininfarina’s Berlinetta design).

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Generations Collide as the Ferrari Enzo Takes on the Ferrari LaFerrari

Generations Collide as the Ferrari Enzo Takes on the Ferrari LaFerrari

The successor takes on its predecessor

A car like the Ferrari LaFerrari bows down to no one. But in the rare occasion that it does pay reverence, it’s only for a select few Ferraris that have come before it. One of those models is the Ferrari Enzo, considered by many as one of the greatest vehicles Ferrari has ever built.

It’s a tough task for any car, even a Ferrari, to live up to the standards set by the Enzo when it was first unveiled at the 2002 Paris Motor Show. Perhaps the LaFerrari is the closest a Ferrari has come to live up to the expectations of the Enzo. Knowing all this, it does make for an intriguing proposition to see both the Enzo and the LaFerrari compete in a drag race against…each other. Does the Enzo still have what it takes to defeat its successor? Can the LaFerrari escape the shadow of its predecessor? These are questions that will only be answered over time. For now, let’s enjoy this drag race and see what happens when two different Ferrari hypercar generations compete against each other.

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2020 Ferrari F8 Spider - Quirks and Facts

2020 Ferrari F8 Spider - Quirks and Facts

The Ferrari F8 Spider Is Almost As Quick As The 488 Spider Pista

Although somewhat overshadowed by the reveal of the last front-engined V-12 Ferrari convertible - the 812 GTS - the new Ferrari F8 Spider still enchanted the right people. Largely favorable reactions to its exterior appearance demonstrate that Ferrari Design Studio knows a thing or two about design even without the help from Pininfarina. Interestingly enough, neither the 812 nor the F8 Spider wore the trademark Rosso Corsa color at their reveal, but they have still picked up a lot of publicity.

The F8 Spider, despite gorgeous, isn’t exactly a lot different compared to the F8 Tributo. The only notable change is, of course, the removable hardtop that stows under the rear tonneau cover in 14 seconds. It needs the same time to fold like the one in the Ferrari 812 GTS.

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Cool Quirks About The New Ferrari 812 GTS

Cool Quirks About The New Ferrari 812 GTS

Ferrari 812 GTS Is Probably The Last V-12-only Open-Top Car Ferrari Will Ever Produce

Just a day after the first Ferrari F1 Scuderia win at Monza since 2010, the Maranello-based car producer revealed two astonishing open-top cars. The elite of the world got a chance to buy, or the hope they’ll be able to buy the V-12 powered 812 GTS and the F8 Spider. Interestingly enough, the F8, as a mid-engine, V-8 powered Spider captures the essence of Ferrari’s future.

On the other hand, the 812 GTS, as the first production V-12 powered, front-engined open-top Ferrari in almost fifty years, is the one that wholeheartedly captures the essence of the brand. With an overpowered V-12 that develops 790 horsepower, rear-wheel drive, and a roof that opens in 14 seconds, the 812 GTS is a swan song. The Ferrari 812 GTS may well be the last new V-12 powered open-top car we ever see. This alone makes it far more appealing than any other open-top car on the market.

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The Potential Engine Choices For the 2022 Ferrari Pursangue Will Blow Your Mind

The Potential Engine Choices For the 2022 Ferrari Pursangue Will Blow Your Mind

Ferrari’s Purosangue SUV Could Keep The V-12 Alive, But Only With Electric Assistance

Ferrari is in a bit of a sauce. It has to persuade the market and its loyal fans that the SUV is a good thing and that n/a engine is not. That is like persuading Americans that socialism works. Not impossible, but tough. And expensive.

So much so that Ferrari already had to announce that the Purosangue won’t be a classic SUV (I don’t know how Ferrari can reinvent the wheel, but let’s see). Plus, it will probably feature a hybrid propulsion system in all its iterations.

That is the big question that burns through the Internet gearhead community. Right now, the word on the street is that the Purosangue engine bay can accept anything - a V-6, V-8, or even the V-12 - and any one of them could sport a hybrid system. Note that it could be scaled to offer a V-6, V-8, or V-12, all of which could be hybrid or non-hybrid.

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Ford vs. Ferrari Trailer 2 - Lots of Racing Drama

Ford vs. Ferrari Trailer 2 - Lots of Racing Drama

Go like hell, indeed, folks!

20th Century Fox’s upcoming Ford vs. Ferrari movie is shaping up to be a barn burner. The second trailer of the James Mangold-directed film has just dropped, and if you don’t get excited about the movie after watching it, then I don’t know what to tell you. The movie, which stars Matt Damon, Christian Bale, Jon Bernthal, and Catriona Balfe, sheds a unique spotlight on the iconic racing war Ford and Ferrari engaged in back in the 1960s for Le Mans supremacy.

The new trailer dives deep into Ford’s singular focus and motivation to wipe out Ferrari’s dominance in the endurance race after a deal between the two automakers went south in the 11th hour. There’s a lot to unpack with the second trailer, though I’d be remiss if I didn’t say that despite the collective star power in the movie featuring several Hollywood A-listers, the true stars of the trailer are the Ford GT40 and the Ferrari 330 P3.

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2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

Ferrari’s replacement for the 488 Spider is just as powerful as the track-ready 488 Pista

The Ferrari F8 Spider is the convertible version of the F8 Tributo. It replaces the outgoing Ferrari 488 Spider in the lineup and just like its coupe counterpart, it features technology and underpinnings from the track-bred 488 Pista. While not as dynamic as the 488 Pista Spider, it’s a solid improvement over the 488 Spider. The F8 Spider joins a prestigious bloodline of drop-top V-8 sports cars that begun with the iconic 308 GTS back in 1977.

Ferrari’s most powerful V-8 convertible alongside the 488 Pista Spider, the F8 Spider arrives just in time to compete with the Lamborghini Huracan Evo Spyder. It also goes against the McLaren 720S Spider, yet another fine example of the high-performance sports car market. Find out what sets apart the F8 Spider from its predecessors and how it compares with its rivals in the detailed review below.

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2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

The front-engined, V-12 convertible GT returns after 50 years

The Ferrari 812 GTS is the convertible version of the 812 Superfast, the grand tourer that replaced the F12berlinetta in 2017. Ferrari’s range-topping drop-top as of 2019, the 812 GTS is also the company’s first production, front-engined, V-12 convertible since 1969. After 20 years of limited edition grand tourers with infinite headroom, Ferrari finally caved in a build a production-ready, drop-top grand tourer.

Besides the "GTS" badge and the minor changes above the waistline, this drop-top is pretty much identical to the 812 Superfast. It has the same 6.5-liter V-12 engine under the hood and comes with almost 800 horsepower on tap. It needs less than three seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start and tops out at more than 200 mph. All told, it’s one of the most potent grand tourers on the market and a turning point for Ferrari, which just released its first full-production convertible GT in 50 years. Find out more about that in the review below.

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What is the Cheapest Ferrari

Before the Ferrari California T went out of production in 2017, it was the cheapest Ferrari that you could get your hands on. Today, the Cheapest Ferrari is the Portofino. The Ferrari Portofino starts out at $214,533 and is powered by a 3.9-liter V-8 that’s good for 592 horsepower and 561 pound-feet of torque. While it might be fast – it can hit 60 mph in 3.2 seconds and tops out at 199 mph – it’s actually a car suitable for daily driving and even has an electric top that allows for unlimited headroom.

What is the Sportiest Ferrari?

Every single one of Ferrari’s current models are sporty, including the Purosangue SUV, but the sportiest today is considered by most to be the 488 GTB. It is a mid-engined successor to the Ferrari 458 and is powered by a 4.0-liter V-8 that pumps out 659 horsepower and 560 pound-feet of torque. It can hit 60 mph in an estimated three seconds and tops out above the 200-mph mark. The 488 GTB features a typical Ferrari price tag that starts out at around $256,000 and increases considerably after adding options.

What is the Most Popular Ferrari?

Since Ferrari doesn’t provide global sales figures by model and it limits global production to no more than 7,000 models per year to maintain exclusivity, it’s hard to nail down a solid model as the most popular. The Ferrari 458 was the brand’s most popular model prior to being succeeded by the 488 GTB, so logic dictates that the 488 is now the brand’s most popular model. The Pur0sangue is the brand’s first SUV and due to the growing popularity in this segment, the Pur0sangue is also a strong runner as the brand’s most popular model.

What is the Most Expensive Ferrari?

If you count out the one-offs and limited-edition models, like the Ferrari LaFerrari, the brand new SF90 Stradale is the brand’s most expensive model that you can still buy. It is powered by a 4.0-liter V-8 and a pair and three electric motors that produce a combined output of 986 horsepower. It can sprint to 62 mph in 2.5 seconds and tops out at 211 mph. It also has an all-electric range of 15 miles and has no reverse gear, relying only on the electric motors to facilitate reversing.

On that note, the model that is really crowned as the most expensive Ferrari is the 1963 Ferrari GTO that recently sold at action for a spleen-bursting $70,000,000 – yeah, Ferraris do get more expensive with age.

Are Ferraris Reliable?

There was a time when Ferrari wasn’t exactly considered a reliable automaker. They are, on the other hand, very high maintenance and that led to a lot of confusion toward brand reliability. That is common in exotic car segment, but Ferrari helps to counter this by offering 7 years of free maintenance on all of its new cars. Now, keep in mind that cost of ownership is still high beyond that seven years – not because of reliability but because of the overall cost of maintenance. We’re not talking about an oil change on a Chevy Cruze, here.