Ferrari

When you think about Ferrari, you probably think about expensive supercars or exotics that are prized by only the world's wealthiest buyers. That might be true, but Ferrari – based in Maranello, Italy – is considered one of the finest automakers in the world and the pinnacle of automotive performance. It has a history that dates back to 1939 when Enzo Ferrari founded Auto Avio Costruzioni, which later produced a car in 1940. The general consensus, however, is that Ferrari wasn't really recognized as the manufacturer that it is today until 1947 when the first Ferrari-badged car was actually completed. Over the years, the company has built a rich motorsport history and now has a lineup that doesn't only offer high-performance cars but cars that are driver-oriented and usable as daily drivers.

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Check Out This Ridiculous Ford GT40 Movie Rig from Ford V Ferrari

Check Out This Ridiculous Ford GT40 Movie Rig from Ford V Ferrari

This just might be the weirdest Ford GT40 you’ll ever see

Making a movie like the just-released Ford vs Ferrari film requires a lot of on-track camera work, some of the creative variety. Look no further than this behind-the-scenes video posted on YouTube by Fab TV, showing what just might be one of the most unusual camera rigs you’ll ever see. That, folks, is a replica Ford GT40, except that it’s only half of the car. The other half is a giant tube-framed platform that not only supports an external driver but, more importantly, a full-blown production setup that includes multiple cameras. This is the kind of movie production razzmatazz that you can expect in 2019. It’s strange, awesome, and downright weird, all rolled into one.

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2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

Ferrari revives our inner detective with latest update of its GT3 racer

You may not know it upon first glance, but this is the new-for-2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 Evo. Yes, Ferrari decided against building a GT3-spec F8 Tributo, and instead, Michelotto was tasked with updating the 488 GT3.Over 18,000 hours of calculations and CFD simulations went into it, and it now has a longer wheelbase following in the footsteps of the GTE car. Power stays at about 500-550 horsepower as per GT3 regulations, but the car will now be faster in the corners and more stable. Ferrari was also thoughtful enough to include an ’Endurance’ package that works hand in hand with the new ECU, supposedly making the car more reliable and smoother.

Look across Ferrari’s fence and into Mercedes-AMG’s yard, and you’ll see the comprehensively updated AMG GT-based GT3 car. You can’t miss that humongous, viperfish-like grille in the front in much the same way you can’t overlook the overhauled Porsche 911 GT3.R. That one, while still an offspring of the 991 generation, is a different beast from the original unveiled in 2015. But Ferrari isn’t one to bankroll a new racing car that easily. So, Ferrari Corse Clienti customers will have to make do with this. It should be good since Russian squad SMP Racing almost won the European Blancpain Endurance Cup this year with the old car, but just how well will it measure up against its competition?

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Ferrari's One-Off Creations is A List of the Most Desirable Prancing Horses of All Time

Ferrari’s One-Off Creations is A List of the Most Desirable Prancing Horses of All Time

It literally can’t get any better than a one-off

Back in 2008, Ferrari launched its One-Off personalization program to a lot of fanfare at that year’s Geneva Motor Show. The goal was to give Maranello’s most important clients the opportunity to create their own Ferraris. It’s been over a decade since that announcement, and it’s safe to say that Ferrari’s program has become a resounding success. Every year, a number of one-off Ferraris enter our lives, commissioned by an individual who Ferrari deems as one of its VIPs. Models like the 2012 Ferrari SP Arya, 2014 Ferrari SP FFX, and 2018 Ferrari SP38 Deborah have been built. Each of these one-offs is unique from every other Ferrari in existence, largely because they came to life as a result of someone’s vision for his or her perfect Ferrari. The 2019 Ferrari P80/C is the latest one-off Ferrari to arrive, but given the success Ferrari has had with the program and the growing demand among customers to get their own “1of1s” — there’s a five-year waitlist, in case you qualify — the P80/C won’t be the last one-off Ferrari in the world. On the contrary, this first ten years of the whole program could be just the beginning of what will most likely turn into one of Ferrari’s most successful customer-centric programs in its long and illustrious history. In case you haven’t paid attention over the last ten years, check out some of the most memorable one-off models that Ferrari has created.

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The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

From classics to current exotics, Maranello has a long and rich history of performance car excellence

Picking the ten best Ferraris of all time is not an easy exercise, but somebody had to do it. Sports cars don’t come finer than those with a Prancing Horse badge, and in the 70 years that it has been around, Ferrari has built some of the finest and most desirable performance cars in the history of the industry. A lot of Ferrari models have climbed the ladder to iconic status, and even some of today’s models are on their way there, too. It took a lot of work — and arguments — but we managed to narrow down our choices for the ten best Ferraris of all time.

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2020 Ferrari 488 Challenge Evo

2020 Ferrari 488 Challenge Evo

There’s a new track beast huffing and puffing in Maranello

Ferrari has just lifted the wraps off its 2020 488 Challenge Evo. The new track-ready speed machine is described as an improvement in aerodynamics first and foremost, with teams now allowed to alter the level of downforce on the front axle independently of the rear axle. On top of that, the Evo comes with a souped-up body kit and looks sharper than ever. Stay close as we walk you through everything you need to know about the 2020 Ferrari 488 Challenge Evo.

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1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

Maybe the most beautiful open-top car that money can buy

The entire Ferrari 250 line seems to have secured its place in the palace of automotive royalties for generations to come. With unmistakable lines, a variety of powerful but also reliable Colombo V-12s, and limited-run production, almost all of the late-50s to early-60s Ferrari 250 models command astronomical values at auction nowadays.

There are, of course, some stars that shine brighter than others, such as the 250 GTO, the 250 GT SWB, and, lastly, the 250 California SWB Spider built between 1960 and 1962. This is one of those short-wheelbase California Spiders but, despite its originality, it lacks the aura of the ex-Alain Delon ’barn find’ that sold for $18.5 million four years ago.

Besides the fact that Alain Delon once owned and thrashed that particular 250 California SWB Spider, what made it even more desirable were its covered headlights. Amazingly, the more sought after variant is, actually, the one Ferrari made more of: a total of 37,250 California SWB Spiders left the factory with covered headlights and just 19 were optioned without the glass over the twin circular headlamps. Read on to learn more about the strange case of a buyer-induced trend that goes against the otherwise untouchable principle of rarity.

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Latest SEMA Auto Show:

How Much Does a Ferrari Cost?

How Much Does a Ferrari Cost?

None of these models come cheap, in case you didn’t know

It’s no secret that Ferraris are expensive. They’re often considered rolling works of art more than they’re thought of as automobiles. That kind of stature affords Ferrari the space to ask for premium prices for its models. Of course, legacy has something to do with it, too. There’s a reason, after all, that the most expensive car ever sold — it fetched for almost $50 million — is a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO. Thankfully, you don’t have to pay that much to buy a brand-new Ferrari these days, but don’t expect to score one for anything less than $200,000, either. Like most exotic manufacturers, Ferrari charges a premium for its vehicles because these cars are developed with the most advanced technologies in the industry. They’re not just museum-grade pieces; they’re also fast, powerful, and loaded with all the latest tech you can find in the business. Plus, there’s cache that comes with wearing the iconic Prancing Horse badge. So if you’re thinking of buying a Ferrari as your next car purchase, do so with the full understanding that you’re going to have to break the bank to afford one.

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10 Things the Ferrari Purosangue Needs to Take on the Competition

10 Things the Ferrari Purosangue Needs to Take on the Competition

It Is Not An SUV, But It Is A Ferrari Utility Vehicle

Ferrari will build an SUV. I am not joking, the company made an announcement. It will be called the Ferrari Purosangue. That’s the official name of the Ferrari SUV. Ok, Ferrari CEO Louis Camilleri implicitly said that he does not want to hear “that word” in the same sentence with the word Ferrari. “That word” being SUV. Ok, Camilleri, I will not do it. Ever. The new Ferrari... truck… will be the most amazing piece of technology ever attempted with the “that word” layout. Luckily, we do know a thing or two about the new Purosangue.

Digression: Is the word crossover any better? Maybe, but I feel it sounds too soft for the status of a Ferrari. The Honda CR-V is a crossover for crying out loud.

The new Purosangue may take a layout similar to what we have been accustomed to with the onslaught of performance SUVs, yet the Italians promised to make it a proper thoroughbred. Incidentally (not really), Purosangue translated from Italian actually means thoroughbred. Is it just me, or the name Ferrari Thoroughbred (in English) wouldn’t sound bad at all? We have a Superfast and we like it, don’t we? Enough with the strange ideas. Purosangue it is.

Christopher Smith of Motor1 explained how to pronounce it:

“PUR-o-SAN-gue. There are four syllables, with emphasis on PUR and SAN. Phonetically speaking, start with PUR, as in a cat purring. From there just say a soft O as in oh, then SAN with a long A sound like saahn, and finish with GUE, which sounds like way but starting with a g – gway. PURR - oh - SAAHN - gway. See? It’s totally easy.”

OK? OK!

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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

The mid-’60s Ferrari that dreams are made of

The Ferrari 275 GTB is widely considered to be one of the prettiest grand touring cars built during the sizzling ’60s. Displaying an evolutionary design language influenced by Ferrari’s glorious 250-series models such as the 250 GTO and the 250 GTE 2+2, the 275 GTB came in both short-nose and long-nose specification, with the 3.3-liter Colombo V-12 first featuring two overhead camshafts before Ferrari introduced, in 1967, the 275 GTB/4 with four overhead camshafts. This here is a Series II 275 GTB or, in other words, a long-nosed version built towards the end of the GTB’s production run in 1966. It’s one of the last of just a few dozen 275 GTBs with an all-aluminum body shell that makes the car both lighter and rust-proof. Too bad it’s as expensive as a handful of Ferrari F40s.

Even fans of modern supercars and wedge-shaped obscurities from the ’80s would oftentimes come together and agree that the GTs made in the ’60s are a sight to behold: elongated noses, low rooflines, and a tail that usually ends with a stubby Kammback. It’s a well-known recipe and few applied it better than Ferrari. Designed by the house of Pininfarina, by now an integral part of the Maranello-based manufacturer, the 275 GTB came to sweepingly replace all of the 250-series models. It was designed to be more user-friendly, more practical, but without giving up on performance or the unique feeling of being behind the wheel of a Ferrari. Included by many publications on shortlists of the prettiest Ferraris of all time, the 275 GTB was also a successful race car and it also spawned an open-top version in the N.A.R.T.-commissioned 275 GTS/4 Spyders built between 1967 and 1968 (the 275 GTS featured a completely different Pininfarina body while the N.A.R.T. cars featured Scaglietti bodies in the style of Pininfarina’s Berlinetta design).

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Generations Collide as the Ferrari Enzo Takes on the Ferrari LaFerrari

Generations Collide as the Ferrari Enzo Takes on the Ferrari LaFerrari

The successor takes on its predecessor

A car like the Ferrari LaFerrari bows down to no one. But in the rare occasion that it does pay reverence, it’s only for a select few Ferraris that have come before it. One of those models is the Ferrari Enzo, considered by many as one of the greatest vehicles Ferrari has ever built.

It’s a tough task for any car, even a Ferrari, to live up to the standards set by the Enzo when it was first unveiled at the 2002 Paris Motor Show. Perhaps the LaFerrari is the closest a Ferrari has come to live up to the expectations of the Enzo. Knowing all this, it does make for an intriguing proposition to see both the Enzo and the LaFerrari compete in a drag race against…each other. Does the Enzo still have what it takes to defeat its successor? Can the LaFerrari escape the shadow of its predecessor? These are questions that will only be answered over time. For now, let’s enjoy this drag race and see what happens when two different Ferrari hypercar generations compete against each other.

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2020 Ferrari F8 Spider - Quirks and Facts

2020 Ferrari F8 Spider - Quirks and Facts

The Ferrari F8 Spider Is Almost As Quick As The 488 Spider Pista

Although somewhat overshadowed by the reveal of the last front-engined V-12 Ferrari convertible - the 812 GTS - the new Ferrari F8 Spider still enchanted the right people. Largely favorable reactions to its exterior appearance demonstrate that Ferrari Design Studio knows a thing or two about design even without the help from Pininfarina. Interestingly enough, neither the 812 nor the F8 Spider wore the trademark Rosso Corsa color at their reveal, but they have still picked up a lot of publicity.

The F8 Spider, despite gorgeous, isn’t exactly a lot different compared to the F8 Tributo. The only notable change is, of course, the removable hardtop that stows under the rear tonneau cover in 14 seconds. It needs the same time to fold like the one in the Ferrari 812 GTS.

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Cool Quirks About The New Ferrari 812 GTS

Cool Quirks About The New Ferrari 812 GTS

Ferrari 812 GTS Is Probably The Last V-12-only Open-Top Car Ferrari Will Ever Produce

Just a day after the first Ferrari F1 Scuderia win at Monza since 2010, the Maranello-based car producer revealed two astonishing open-top cars. The elite of the world got a chance to buy, or the hope they’ll be able to buy the V-12 powered 812 GTS and the F8 Spider. Interestingly enough, the F8, as a mid-engine, V-8 powered Spider captures the essence of Ferrari’s future.

On the other hand, the 812 GTS, as the first production V-12 powered, front-engined open-top Ferrari in almost fifty years, is the one that wholeheartedly captures the essence of the brand. With an overpowered V-12 that develops 790 horsepower, rear-wheel drive, and a roof that opens in 14 seconds, the 812 GTS is a swan song. The Ferrari 812 GTS may well be the last new V-12 powered open-top car we ever see. This alone makes it far more appealing than any other open-top car on the market.

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The Potential Engine Choices For the 2022 Ferrari Pursangue Will Blow Your Mind

The Potential Engine Choices For the 2022 Ferrari Pursangue Will Blow Your Mind

Ferrari’s Purosangue SUV Could Keep The V-12 Alive, But Only With Electric Assistance

Ferrari is in a bit of a sauce. It has to persuade the market and its loyal fans that the SUV is a good thing and that n/a engine is not. That is like persuading Americans that socialism works. Not impossible, but tough. And expensive.

So much so that Ferrari already had to announce that the Purosangue won’t be a classic SUV (I don’t know how Ferrari can reinvent the wheel, but let’s see). Plus, it will probably feature a hybrid propulsion system in all its iterations.

That is the big question that burns through the Internet gearhead community. Right now, the word on the street is that the Purosangue engine bay can accept anything - a V-6, V-8, or even the V-12 - and any one of them could sport a hybrid system. Note that it could be scaled to offer a V-6, V-8, or V-12, all of which could be hybrid or non-hybrid.

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Ford vs. Ferrari Trailer 2 - Lots of Racing Drama

Ford vs. Ferrari Trailer 2 - Lots of Racing Drama

Go like hell, indeed, folks!

20th Century Fox’s upcoming Ford vs. Ferrari movie is shaping up to be a barn burner. The second trailer of the James Mangold-directed film has just dropped, and if you don’t get excited about the movie after watching it, then I don’t know what to tell you. The movie, which stars Matt Damon, Christian Bale, Jon Bernthal, and Catriona Balfe, sheds a unique spotlight on the iconic racing war Ford and Ferrari engaged in back in the 1960s for Le Mans supremacy.

The new trailer dives deep into Ford’s singular focus and motivation to wipe out Ferrari’s dominance in the endurance race after a deal between the two automakers went south in the 11th hour. There’s a lot to unpack with the second trailer, though I’d be remiss if I didn’t say that despite the collective star power in the movie featuring several Hollywood A-listers, the true stars of the trailer are the Ford GT40 and the Ferrari 330 P3.

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2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

Ferrari’s replacement for the 488 Spider is just as powerful as the track-ready 488 Pista

The Ferrari F8 Spider is the convertible version of the F8 Tributo. It replaces the outgoing Ferrari 488 Spider in the lineup and just like its coupe counterpart, it features technology and underpinnings from the track-bred 488 Pista. While not as dynamic as the 488 Pista Spider, it’s a solid improvement over the 488 Spider. The F8 Spider joins a prestigious bloodline of drop-top V-8 sports cars that begun with the iconic 308 GTS back in 1977.

Ferrari’s most powerful V-8 convertible alongside the 488 Pista Spider, the F8 Spider arrives just in time to compete with the Lamborghini Huracan Evo Spyder. It also goes against the McLaren 720S Spider, yet another fine example of the high-performance sports car market. Find out what sets apart the F8 Spider from its predecessors and how it compares with its rivals in the detailed review below.

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2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

The front-engined, V-12 convertible GT returns after 50 years

The Ferrari 812 GTS is the convertible version of the 812 Superfast, the grand tourer that replaced the F12berlinetta in 2017. Ferrari’s range-topping drop-top as of 2019, the 812 GTS is also the company’s first production, front-engined, V-12 convertible since 1969. After 20 years of limited edition grand tourers with infinite headroom, Ferrari finally caved in a build a production-ready, drop-top grand tourer.

Besides the "GTS" badge and the minor changes above the waistline, this drop-top is pretty much identical to the 812 Superfast. It has the same 6.5-liter V-12 engine under the hood and comes with almost 800 horsepower on tap. It needs less than three seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start and tops out at more than 200 mph. All told, it’s one of the most potent grand tourers on the market and a turning point for Ferrari, which just released its first full-production convertible GT in 50 years. Find out more about that in the review below.

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Ferrari Thinks It's Too Good To Offer an “Entry-Level” Model

Ferrari Thinks It’s Too Good To Offer an “Entry-Level” Model

Hoping to spend less than $200,00 for a new Ferrari? Not Gonna Happen

It wasn’t that long ago that Ferrari offered a simple, entry-level model known as the California. It carried an MSRP – as of 2018 – that started at right around $120,000 for the base model. It may have increased to more than $300,000 in higher trim levels, but the point is that you could step into a brand-new Ferrari for what some Ferrari customers would consider pocket change. The die-hard purists weren’t too fond of such a “cheap” model, but it served a real purpose – it allowed those who otherwise couldn’t afford a Ferrari to own a prancing horse.

With the California officially discontinued as of the end of 2018, Ferrari’s cheapest model is now the Ferrari Portofino with a starting price of around $215,000. Ferrari was expected to revive the Dino name, which was associated with affordability in the 60s and 70s, on a new entry-level model and spiritual successor the original Dino. Ferrari now says that isn’t going to happen – here’s why.

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The 2020 Ferrari 812 GTS Spider Has a Front-Mounted V-12 and That's a Big Deal

The 2020 Ferrari 812 GTS Spider Has a Front-Mounted V-12 and That’s a Big Deal

The Ferrari 812 GTS is the drop top 812 Superfast you’ve been wanting

If you were holding off buying the Ferrari 812 Superfast because you really wanted it as a convertible, then you should grab your checkbook because that exact car has been unveiled. It’s called the 812 GTS and Ferrari didn’t mess around with it too much - it really is just that: the drop-top version of the 812 hardtop.

Ferrari is keen to remind use that this particular formula - drop top, V-12 engine in the front, is really quite a rare combination throughout the manufacturer’s history. It points out that the last such model to go on sale was the 2010 Ferrari SA Aperta, although it also counts the limited-series 2014 Ferrari F60 America that was launched to mark the manufacturer’s 60th year on the American market.

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The Ferrari F8 Spider - A Topless Beauty You Don't Deserve

The Ferrari F8 Spider - A Topless Beauty You Don’t Deserve

Ferrari keeps seeing fastballs, and it keeps knocking them out of the park

Like the Ferrari 458 Italia and the Ferrari 488 GTB before it, we all knew that it was only a matter of time before Ferrari introduced the roofless version of the recently unveiled Ferrari F8. It didn’t take long — roughly six months if you’re counting — because the Ferrari F8 Spider is here, and it is a certified show-stopper. It’s not an accident that Ferrari is using the platform of the 2019 Frankfurt Motor Show to showcase its latest roadster model, or “Spider,” as Maranello prefers to call it. It did a similar thing when it introduced the F8 Tributo earlier this year at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show. The F8 Roadster, though, takes center stage this time as Ferrari’s latest stunner. It’s lighter and more powerful than the 488 Spider, the model that it’s directly succeeding. It can even go toe-to-toe with the 488 Spider’s more sinister alter ego, the 488 Pista Spider. This is the all-new, soul-snatching Ferrari F8 Spider. Looks like it’s flex-season for Ferrari once again.

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