Back to Ferrari

Ferrari Luxury Cars

Models

view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
Now Ferrari is Suing a Non-Profit Charity for Using the Purosangue Name

Now Ferrari is Suing a Non-Profit Charity for Using the Purosangue Name

I better be careful in how I write this news or I might be next one to get sued...

It’s starting to feel like with every new year, there’s a new case of Ferrari bullying someone with legal action. Last year, it happened when the company threatened to file suit against someone for posting a picture of a Ferrari 812 Superfast with a pair of one-off shoes sitting on it. This year? Well, it looks like Ferrari has decided to file suit against a non-profit charity for using the Purosangue name. Is there merit to the suit or is it just another case of bullying by a company that’s overly aggressive with protecting its image?

Read more
The Ferrari Purosangue Is Scheduled to Arrive in 2021 and It May Even Pack a V-12 After All

The Ferrari Purosangue Is Scheduled to Arrive in 2021 and It May Even Pack a V-12 After All

In three years, we’ve gone from no hope of a Ferrari SUV to one Packing a V-12 by 2021

It’s only been three years since then CEO Sergio Marchionne killed off any hope of a Ferrari-branded SUV. In fact, back in 2016 he said, according to Bloomberg Business, that it would only happen “over my dead body.” Well, God rest his soul (he passed away on July 25, 2018) but, sure enough, the Ferrari Purosangue is scheduled to arrive by 2021. Even better yet, we’ve learned some new details, none of which is more important than the potential for Ferrari’s 6.5-liter V-12 to continue its reign as Ferrari’s range-topping engine.

Read more
New Rendering Shows What the Ferrari Purosangue Would Look Like With Lots of Roma Styling

New Rendering Shows What the Ferrari Purosangue Would Look Like With Lots of Roma Styling

Can you feel the DBX-like vibe?

Ferrari’s first SUV is happening whether we like it or not. Maranello is poised to give the Urus a run for its money with a high-riding vehicle, the so-called Purosangue. Little is known about Ferrari’s first (and hopefully last) attempt to attract SUV-loving clients, which means pixel manipulators around the world have had a lot of leeway in coming up with their vision on what the Purosangue could look like.

Of that bunch, Laco Design came forward a pair of renderings that take a stab at guessing a potential design avenue Ferrari might or might not take with the Purosangue, opting to bake in a handful of styling cues seen on Ferrari’s stunningly elegant 2020 Roma supercar.

Read more
2020 Ferrari Roma

2020 Ferrari Roma

Ferrari has introduced the Roma, a car that is considered to be the most elegant and exotic Ferrari ever made. It features the latest concept of “Nuove Dolce Vita” (New Sweet Life) design that improves on a number of things, the most important of which is aerodynamics. The Roma has a traditional shark nose up front with linear LED headlights while the side profile is void of the usual side shields – a move that harkens back to the 1950s. The rear end features and active spoiler and a compact diffuser that just exudes the car’s sporty and performance-oriented nature.

The interior has an evolved version of the of the dual-cockpit concept that includes an individual cell for the driver and passenger – a design that gives the passenger the feeling of being a co-pilot. Interior materials include:

Full-grain Frau leather Alcantara Chromed aluminum Carbon fiber

Power comes from a 3.0-liter V-8 that’s good for 612 horsepower and 561 pound-feet of torque – the former of which represents a 20-horsepower increase over the car it’s based on. The Roma, in this specification, can reach 62.1 mph (100 km/h) in 3.4 seconds on the way to a top speed of 200 mph. Ferrari has yet to release pricing details, but word has it that an MSRP of at least $225,000 is expected.

Read more
Buyer of $44 Million Ferrari 250 GTO Goes to Court Over Disputed OG Transmission

Buyer of $44 Million Ferrari 250 GTO Goes to Court Over Disputed OG Transmission

It sounds silly until you realize just how much money is actually involved

One of the most expensive cars ever sold is now at the center of a lawsuit, all because of a missing part. The car in question is a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO, which sold for $44 million in 2017 after British classic car trader Gregor Fisken purchased it from American collector and lawyer Bernard Carl.

A transaction of that amount should’ve made Fisken and Carl friends for life, but the opposite has happened as the two heavyweight collectors are now entangled in a lawsuit involving the 250 GTO’s original five-speed manual transmission, which didn’t come with the car when Fisken purchased it from Carl. It remains unclear if Fisken is owed the original five-speed transmission, but the lawsuit has already been heard by the U.K. High Court. The judge presiding over the lawsuit is reportedly days away from making a verdict.

Read more
Car For Sale: 2017 Ferrari Berlinetta Lusso Touring Superleggera

Car For Sale: 2017 Ferrari Berlinetta Lusso Touring Superleggera

Carrozzeria Touring infused some extra old-school chic into five F12s and this is one of them

Back in the day, when Enzo Ferrari was at the helm of the company bearing his own name, no more than a few hundred cars left Maranello each year. In 2018, Ferrari sold 9,251 cars, over 2,500 of those reaching American homes. It is, then, no wonder that the ultra-rich no longer want the ’average’ Ferrari and look for something special, something doused in the uniqueness of vintage Ferraris. Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera heeded the trend and, in 2015, built five Berlinetta Lussos based on F12 Berlinetta underpinnings. It looks incredible while losing none of the on-road prowess of a standard F12.

Ferrari’s F12 Berlinetta is bound to become a future classic as one of the last front-engined, V-12 monsters from Ferrari. Sure, its replacement, the 812 Superfast, gets all the acclaim nowadays but we’re sure collectors will find the F12 with all of its 730 horsepower from that awe-inspiring 6.3-liter V-12 an interesting collector’s item in the decades to come. Remember, no one wanted the 250 GTO when it was only a few years old either. So, you can imagine this re-bodied version, that looks at least as good if not better, commands a hefty price. Sadly, dealer O’Kane Lavers will only tell you the number if it thinks you’re serious enough about buying the car.

Read more

Latest Wallpapers:

The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

From classics to current exotics, Maranello has a long and rich history of performance car excellence

Picking the ten best Ferraris of all time is not an easy exercise, but somebody had to do it. Sports cars don’t come finer than those with a Prancing Horse badge, and in the 70 years that it has been around, Ferrari has built some of the finest and most desirable performance cars in the history of the industry. A lot of Ferrari models have climbed the ladder to iconic status, and even some of today’s models are on their way there, too. It took a lot of work — and arguments — but we managed to narrow down our choices for the ten best Ferraris of all time.

Read more
1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

Maybe the most beautiful open-top car that money can buy

The entire Ferrari 250 line seems to have secured its place in the palace of automotive royalties for generations to come. With unmistakable lines, a variety of powerful but also reliable Colombo V-12s, and limited-run production, almost all of the late-50s to early-60s Ferrari 250 models command astronomical values at auction nowadays.

There are, of course, some stars that shine brighter than others, such as the 250 GTO, the 250 GT SWB, and, lastly, the 250 California SWB Spider built between 1960 and 1962. This is one of those short-wheelbase California Spiders but, despite its originality, it lacks the aura of the ex-Alain Delon ’barn find’ that sold for $18.5 million four years ago.

Besides the fact that Alain Delon once owned and thrashed that particular 250 California SWB Spider, what made it even more desirable were its covered headlights. Amazingly, the more sought after variant is, actually, the one Ferrari made more of: a total of 37,250 California SWB Spiders left the factory with covered headlights and just 19 were optioned without the glass over the twin circular headlamps. Read on to learn more about the strange case of a buyer-induced trend that goes against the otherwise untouchable principle of rarity.

Read more
10 Things the Ferrari Purosangue Needs to Take on the Competition

10 Things the Ferrari Purosangue Needs to Take on the Competition

It Is Not An SUV, But It Is A Ferrari Utility Vehicle

Ferrari will build an SUV. I am not joking, the company made an announcement. It will be called the Ferrari Purosangue. That’s the official name of the Ferrari SUV. Ok, Ferrari CEO Louis Camilleri implicitly said that he does not want to hear “that word” in the same sentence with the word Ferrari. “That word” being SUV. Ok, Camilleri, I will not do it. Ever. The new Ferrari... truck… will be the most amazing piece of technology ever attempted with the “that word” layout. Luckily, we do know a thing or two about the new Purosangue.

Digression: Is the word crossover any better? Maybe, but I feel it sounds too soft for the status of a Ferrari. The Honda CR-V is a crossover for crying out loud.

The new Purosangue may take a layout similar to what we have been accustomed to with the onslaught of performance SUVs, yet the Italians promised to make it a proper thoroughbred. Incidentally (not really), Purosangue translated from Italian actually means thoroughbred. Is it just me, or the name Ferrari Thoroughbred (in English) wouldn’t sound bad at all? We have a Superfast and we like it, don’t we? Enough with the strange ideas. Purosangue it is.

Christopher Smith of Motor1 explained how to pronounce it:

“PUR-o-SAN-gue. There are four syllables, with emphasis on PUR and SAN. Phonetically speaking, start with PUR, as in a cat purring. From there just say a soft O as in oh, then SAN with a long A sound like saahn, and finish with GUE, which sounds like way but starting with a g – gway. PURR - oh - SAAHN - gway. See? It’s totally easy.”

OK? OK!

Read more
1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

The mid-’60s Ferrari that dreams are made of

The Ferrari 275 GTB is widely considered to be one of the prettiest grand touring cars built during the sizzling ’60s. Displaying an evolutionary design language influenced by Ferrari’s glorious 250-series models such as the 250 GTO and the 250 GTE 2+2, the 275 GTB came in both short-nose and long-nose specification, with the 3.3-liter Colombo V-12 first featuring two overhead camshafts before Ferrari introduced, in 1967, the 275 GTB/4 with four overhead camshafts. This here is a Series II 275 GTB or, in other words, a long-nosed version built towards the end of the GTB’s production run in 1966. It’s one of the last of just a few dozen 275 GTBs with an all-aluminum body shell that makes the car both lighter and rust-proof. Too bad it’s as expensive as a handful of Ferrari F40s.

Even fans of modern supercars and wedge-shaped obscurities from the ’80s would oftentimes come together and agree that the GTs made in the ’60s are a sight to behold: elongated noses, low rooflines, and a tail that usually ends with a stubby Kammback. It’s a well-known recipe and few applied it better than Ferrari. Designed by the house of Pininfarina, by now an integral part of the Maranello-based manufacturer, the 275 GTB came to sweepingly replace all of the 250-series models. It was designed to be more user-friendly, more practical, but without giving up on performance or the unique feeling of being behind the wheel of a Ferrari. Included by many publications on shortlists of the prettiest Ferraris of all time, the 275 GTB was also a successful race car and it also spawned an open-top version in the N.A.R.T.-commissioned 275 GTS/4 Spyders built between 1967 and 1968 (the 275 GTS featured a completely different Pininfarina body while the N.A.R.T. cars featured Scaglietti bodies in the style of Pininfarina’s Berlinetta design).

Read more
The Potential Engine Choices For the 2022 Ferrari Pursangue Will Blow Your Mind

The Potential Engine Choices For the 2022 Ferrari Pursangue Will Blow Your Mind

Ferrari’s Purosangue SUV Could Keep The V-12 Alive, But Only With Electric Assistance

Ferrari is in a bit of a sauce. It has to persuade the market and its loyal fans that the SUV is a good thing and that n/a engine is not. That is like persuading Americans that socialism works. Not impossible, but tough. And expensive.

So much so that Ferrari already had to announce that the Purosangue won’t be a classic SUV (I don’t know how Ferrari can reinvent the wheel, but let’s see). Plus, it will probably feature a hybrid propulsion system in all its iterations.

That is the big question that burns through the Internet gearhead community. Right now, the word on the street is that the Purosangue engine bay can accept anything - a V-6, V-8, or even the V-12 - and any one of them could sport a hybrid system. Note that it could be scaled to offer a V-6, V-8, or V-12, all of which could be hybrid or non-hybrid.

Read more
2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

Ferrari’s replacement for the 488 Spider is just as powerful as the track-ready 488 Pista

The Ferrari F8 Spider is the convertible version of the F8 Tributo. It replaces the outgoing Ferrari 488 Spider in the lineup and just like its coupe counterpart, it features technology and underpinnings from the track-bred 488 Pista. While not as dynamic as the 488 Pista Spider, it’s a solid improvement over the 488 Spider. The F8 Spider joins a prestigious bloodline of drop-top V-8 sports cars that begun with the iconic 308 GTS back in 1977.

Ferrari’s most powerful V-8 convertible alongside the 488 Pista Spider, the F8 Spider arrives just in time to compete with the Lamborghini Huracan Evo Spyder. It also goes against the McLaren 720S Spider, yet another fine example of the high-performance sports car market. Find out what sets apart the F8 Spider from its predecessors and how it compares with its rivals in the detailed review below.

Read more
1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

The shark-nosed sports prototype from Maranello

The Drake, a man who honed his craft as the team boss of Alfa Corse in the ’30s, carried some of the old adages over when he started his own automotive company. It’s no wonder, then, that he was reluctant to jump on the rear-mid engine train when it boomed two decades after the last pre-war Grand Prix but when his Prancing Horses finally rolled out with the engine aft of the driver they proved overwhelmingly good: in F1, the 156 steamrolled its way to both the Constructor’s and the Driver’s F1 title in 1961 and, in long-distance racing, the 196 SP, as a direct descendant of the 246 SP, foresaw what was to come in sports car racing.

The 196 SP is an incredibly rare and incredibly gorgeous beast. With a low-slung body and a nose very similar to that of the 156 F1 car, it carried what was good about the 246 SP, the first Ferrari mid-engined sports car that was unveiled in 1961, and improved on the formula. Under the rear deck, there was, effectively, half of a Colombo V-12, and not the Dino V-6 although the 196 SP has been referred to as the Dino 196 SP in some circles. Five were built for 1962 and this one, chassis #0806 is the only that has survived. RM/Sotheby’s tried selling it during the Monterey Car Week but failed. Still, the car is valued at anywhere between $8 million and $10 million. Keep reading to find out why this V-6-engined Ferrari is worth more than twice the price of a LaFerrari, Maranello’s V-12 hybrid wonder.

Read more
1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

A one-off coupé based on the Ferrari 375 MM race car

The 1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale is a one-off version of the iconic 375 MM bodied by Italian coach builder Ghia. The Ferrari 375 MM was built from 1953 until 1955. It was developed as a race car, but some were converted to road use. One of only nine road-going coupés built on the 375 MM chassis, the Coupé Speciale is also the only 375 design by Ghia and the last Ferrari built by the company. The car was showcased at the 1955 Torino Motor Show and was then shipped to Robert Wilke, owner of the Leader Card Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

A racing fan, Wilke, who sponsored an IndyCar team from the 1930s until his death in 1970, was also a personal friend of Enzo Ferrari. The 375 MM Coupé Speciale was one of seven unique vehicles that Ferrari built for the businessman, but it’s the most historically significant vehicle owned by him. Also one of the most documented Ferraris in existence, the Coupé Speciale changed hands several times since the 1970s. Come 2019 and it’s going under the hammer to find a new owner at RM Sotheby’s car sale in Monterey on August 15-17.

Read more