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2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

The front-engined, V-12 convertible GT returns after 50 years

The Ferrari 812 GTS is the convertible version of the 812 Superfast, the grand tourer that replaced the F12berlinetta in 2017. Ferrari’s range-topping drop-top as of 2019, the 812 GTS is also the company’s first production, front-engined, V-12 convertible since 1969. After 20 years of limited edition grand tourers with infinite headroom, Ferrari finally caved in a build a production-ready, drop-top grand tourer.

Besides the "GTS" badge and the minor changes above the waistline, this drop-top is pretty much identical to the 812 Superfast. It has the same 6.5-liter V-12 engine under the hood and comes with almost 800 horsepower on tap. It needs less than three seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start and tops out at more than 200 mph. All told, it’s one of the most potent grand tourers on the market and a turning point for Ferrari, which just released its first full-production convertible GT in 50 years. Find out more about that in the review below.

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1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

Maranello’s answer to the Porsche 911

In 1968, Ferrari had been on the market as a road car manufacturer for 21 years and was already enjoying massive success. It had already won the Formula One championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans and launched iconic cars like the 250 GTO, 275 GTB, and the 400 Superamerica. However, the cars were very expensive, and Ferrari was looking for a shot at the more affordable sports car market. And it created the Dino for this exact purpose.

Launched in 1968, the first Dino was called the 206 GT. Powered by a 2.0-liter V-6, it was designed by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti and produced until 1969. The Dino was updated in 1969 and renamed the 246 GT. A convertible model called the GTS was also introduced. The original Dino was phased out in 1974, but a redesigned model called the 308 GT4 was launched in 1973 and kept into production until 1980. That’s when the Dino brand was dropped altogether, and Ferrari’s next affordable sports car was called the Mondial.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Dino 206 GT.

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1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE)

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE)

A genuine four-seater sports car

While the Prancing Horse is best known for its top-shelf performance vehicles and winning racing machines, even Maranello’s finest must occasionally bend to the whims of the passenger vehicle market. But don’t see it as a compromise - rather, it’s best seen as a combination of speed and usability, catapulting the commonplace people mover to the extraordinary realm of apexes and checkered flags. Such is the case with the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2, the brand’s first genuine four-seater model.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE).

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1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2

1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2

If only James Bond was Italian...

The 330 GT 2+2 was actually an update to the 330 America that Ferrari built in 1963 only. It also replaced the 250 GT/E 2+2, but it was larger and sportier. Introduced in 1964, the 330 GT 2+2 was upgraded in 1965, when the Series II model with a new design was launched. Production lasted until 1967, with 1,099 examples built until the Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 was introduced as a replacement. The cool thing about these cars is that they’ve remained somewhat affordable compared to other million-dollar Ferraris from the era.

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2004 - 2011 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti

2004 - 2011 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti

Bridging the gap between the 456 and the FF

In 2003, the Ferrari 456 was discontinued after 11 years in production. The grand tourer, which had been updated to 456M specs in 1998, was then replaced by the 612 Scaglietti. Designed by Ken Okuyama and Frank Stephenson, the 612 Scaglietti was bigger than the 456, and thus it was a true four-seater rather than a 2+2 GT like its predecessor. Named in honor of Sergio Scaglietti, who designed many Ferraris in the 1950s, including the 250 Testa Rossa, the 612 also pays homage to the 375 MM that company director Roberto Rossellini had commissioned for his wife, Ingrid Bergman, in 1954.

Unlike its forerunner, the 612 was an all-aluminum vehicle and the second following the 360 Modena. Developed with Alcoa, the space frame was later used in the 599 GTB. The GT also came with a redesigned engine. While the 456 used a 5.5-liter V-12, the 612 received the larger mill from the 575 Superamerica. While the "612" badge suggests a 6.0-liter engine, the displacement was actually 5.7 liters. Produced at the Carrozzeria Scaglietti plant, the 612 was taken to Maranello to have its interior and V-12 put in. A total of 3025 cars were produced until 2011 when the 612 was replaced by the FF. Ferrari also produced a series of limited-edition model, but more about that in the review below.

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1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast by Pininfarina

1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast by Pininfarina

Maranello’s flagship GT in the 1960s

One of the most iconic Ferrari nameplates, the America is also one of the longest standing badges from Maranello, being offered in various cars from 1951 through 1967. However, none of the Americas stand out as the top-of-the-line 500 Superfast model, which was built between 1964 and 1966 in only 37 units. As rare as they get, the Superfast is next to impossible to buy, but one example is going up for auction in Monterey this month.

Bearing chassis no. 8459SF, this specific car was the 33rd Superfast built and the eighth of 12 Series II models. It was also the seventh of only eight Superfasts built with right-hand drive. It was delivered in 1966 to British sportsman Jack Durlacher and was sold in 1976. Restored in 1981, it remained with the Manoukian Brothers for 15 years until 2007, when it was sold to the current owner. While not in mint condition, with minor dents and sign of use inside and out, the 500 Superfast has held up well, and it’s still fitted with the original engine. Let’s find out more about this fantastic grand tourer in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 500 Superfast Series II by Pininfarina

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2018 Ferrari 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari

2018 Ferrari 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari

You need to be a Ferrari racing driver to be able to buy it

It’s been only three months since the hardcore Ferrari 488 Pista was unveiled at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, and the Maranello-based firm has already created a special edition of the supercar. Designed to celebrate the 488’s success on the race track, it’s called the 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari and made its debut ahead of the iconic 24 Hours of Le Mans race.

Inspired by AF Corse’s no. 51 car, with which Alessandro Pier Guidi and James Calado won the 2017 FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC) Drivers’ and Manufacturers’ titles, the Pista Piloti Ferrari is available exclusively to customers involved in the company’s motorsport programs. In short, if you’re not racing a race-spec version of the 488, be it a GT3 or a GTE, you can’t buy one. That’s a bit harsh from the Italians, but let’s a have a closer look at what you’re missing if you’re not involved in this program.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari.

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2018 Ferrari SP38

2018 Ferrari SP38

Based on the 488 GTB, only one made

Introduced in 2015 as a replacement for the 458 Italia, the Ferrari 488 GTB is already an iconic supercar. It already spawned a topless, Spider version, as well as a replacement for the 458 Speciale, called the 488 Pista. Racing duties go to the 488 GTE and 488 GT3 for the most coveted classes in the FIA-governed championships. Much like its predecessor, it was also used for a custom limited-edition model, called the J50 and built in just ten units to celebrate 50 years since the Italian brand arrived in Japan. Come 2018 and Ferrari rolled off yet another bespoke model. It’s called the SP38, and only one will ever see the light of day.

Developed by company’s One-Off program, the SP38 was designed by the Ferrari Design Center on the chassis and running gear of the 488 GTB. It was unveiled at Ferrari’s Fiorano test track, where it was handed over to one of the company’s most dedicated customers. The new supercar will be on public display for the first time at the 2018 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este before it will find its way in a heated garage. Needless to say, the SP38 is the most intriguing version of the 488 GTB yet, and it will probably become a highly sought-after collectible in a few years.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari SP38.

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2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo

2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo

The ultimate LaFerrari!

When a high-profile carmaker such as Ferrari launches a great supercar like the LaFerrari, it’s difficult to imagine a way to significantly improve the design. But the team from Maranello has already done it twice. First, Ferrari launched the FXX-K, a track-only LaFerrari with enhanced aerodynamics. This happened back in 2015. Two years have passed, and the Prancing Horse found a way to make the FXX-K even more brutal. It’s called the FXX-K Evo, and it has more downforce than any Ferrari to date!

Launched at the 2017 Finali Mondiale of the Ferrari Challenge, the FXX-K Evo takes the familiar FXX-K to a new level in the same way that the

Enzo

based FXX Evoluzione was a heavily upgraded FXX. Just like the FXX-K, the Evo is not homologated for road use, and production will be limited to only a few models. However, the Evo is also available as an upgrade to the standard FXX-K. The package includes many add-ons, starting with an aerodynamic kit built upon know-how obtained from the many racing series Ferrari competes in, including Formula One, GT3, GTE, and Challenge. It’s also lighter due to increased use of carbon-fiber and despite having a much larger rear wing. Yes, the FXX-K is a monster of a LaFerrari so keep reading my full review to find out more.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari FXX-K Evo.

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2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta #210

2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta #210

Could this be the hypercar that sells for $10 million?

The last Ferrari Laferrari Aperta is headed to the auction block this weekend. That alone should be enough to warrant headlines, but as most of you already know, the auction-bound LaFerrari Aperta is special in its own right. This unit isn’t supposed to exist in the first place. This is the 210th LaFerrari Aperta, a last-second creation by Maranello that isn’t a part of the initial lot of 209 units that the automaker planned to launch but was nonetheless built as an auction piece to benefit the “Save the Children” charity.

The auction is set to take place at Ferrari’s Fiorano track and is part of RM Sotheby’s “Legend e Passione” event being held as part of the Italian automaker’s 50th anniversary. Befitting the event on September 9, Ferrari gave the LaFerrari Aperta a unique look no other model of its kind had when they all came out of production. These features firmly establish the 210th model as a legitimate one-of-a-kind LaFerrari Aperta, the kind of car that Ferrari collectors will trip over themselves to get a hold of. It’s no surprise then that neither Ferrari nor RM Sotheby’s has released an estimate for the car. Considering that the 500th LaFerrari – the precursor of the 210th LaFerrari Aperta – fetched $7 million in a similar auction setting last year, the sky really is the limit as to how much the 210th LaFerrari Aperta is going to sell for this weekend.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2017 Ferrari F12tdf

2017 Ferrari F12tdf

Although the majority of Ferraris built over the last four decades have featured a mid-engine layout, there was a time when all of Maranello’s products were front-engined. Until the mid-1960s, Enzo Ferrari felt that a mid-engine Ferrari would be unsafe in the hands of customers. That changed in 1966, when Enzo, having seen the stir Lamborghini created with the 1966-1974 Lamborghini Miura, approved the V-6-powered 1967-1980 Ferrari Dino for production. Although mid-engined supercars became increasingly popular through the 1970s, Ferrari continued to build front-engined cars into the 21st century, with the current lineup including the 2013 Ferrari F12berlinetta, 2012 Ferrari FF, and 2015 Ferrari California T.

The F12berlinetta, a full-fledged grand tourer, harkens back to the 1968-1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 "Daytona" of the late 1960s, and in many way to the iconic 1964-1966 Ferrari 275 GTB and 1962-1964 Ferrari 250 GTO. Much like its predecessors, it spawned various one-off and special-edition models, including the 2014 Ferrari F12 TRS, 2015 Ferrari SP America, 2015 Ferrari F60 America, and the 2015 Carrozzeria Touring Berlinetta Lusso. Now, Ferrari injected more power into the F12berlinetta to create the F12tdf, a tribute to the legendary Tour de France automobile race, an event Maranello dominated from 1956 through 1964.

Originally rumored to wear a "Speciale" badge, the F12tdf is more than just a tribute car with added grunt. The F12berlinetta shell has been redesigned for improved downforce and weight has been reduce by means of extensive carbon-fiber and aluminum use. Additionally, the Italians used new state-of-the-art tech to make the F12tdf one of the quickest Ferraris out there. Find out more below.

Updated 08/17/2017: We added a series on new images and a video taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F12tdf.

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2021 Ferrari LaFerrari Successor

2021 Ferrari LaFerrari Successor

Say hello to Maranello’s very first all-electric monster machine

Blasphemy. That’s probably the first thought of any purist considering the creation of an all-electric Ferrari. Blasphemy and sacrilege. FCA head Sergio Marchionne would agree. In 2016, at the Geneva International Auto Show, the CEO remarked that the idea of an all-electric Ferrari was “an almost obscene concept.” Later that year, at the Paris Auto Show, Ferrari’s Chief Technical Officer, Michael Leiters, echoed Marchionne’s sentiment, albeit in slightly softer terms. “We would not follow to develop a fully electric car,” Leiters said, adding, “We are convinced that it’s right to have a hybrid car because, for us, the sound is a very crucially important characteristic of a Ferrari, and our customers want to have this.” Fair enough. Thing is, even a flat-out rejection isn’t enough to stop a possible EV Ferrari. Let me explain.

First off, the sound. The howl of internal combustion is as important to the Ferrari brand as red paint, and we get that. This is a company lives and dies by its engines. The thing is Ferrari is already testing the waters – turbocharged models have been around for decades now, and electrification is integral to the performance of the “ultimate” LaFerrari hypercar. What’s more, Sergio Marchionne has already discussed the possibility of entering Formula E. Throw in continued EV development from competitors like Porsche and McLaren, and relevancy starts to become an issue. Finally, there’s that old Enzo Ferrari quote: “Aerodynamics are for people who can’t build engines.” The point is this – never say never.

Continue reading to learn more about the all-electric Ferrari LaFerrari Successor.

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1989 Ferrari Testarossa Convertible

1989 Ferrari Testarossa Convertible

An ‘80s icon goes topless

In the mid-‘80s, Ferrari introduced the Testarossa, a two-door berlinetta created as a replacement for the Berlinetta Boxer 512i. The name was a nod to the Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa race car that ran in the World Sportscar Championship in the late ‘50s, but the new model was anything but old school. Occupying the top of the Prancing Horse model lineup, the new Testarossa was subsequently well received amongst critics and the buying public. Not only was it popularized by the show Miami Vice, but several prominent celebrities owned one, and eventually, the Testarossa became a well known symbol of ‘80s culture. Considering the popularity, you’d expect Ferrari to be eager to produce a drop-top version of the 12-cylinder sports car, but not so – only one “official” Testarossa convertible was ever produced, forcing custom builders to make their own roofless variants after the fact. This car is one of those rare custom Testarossa convertibles.

At its heart, the car you see here is a 1989 model. It’s nearly identical in every single way to the Testarossas that rolled out from Maranello and into Ferrari dealerships nearly three decades ago, save the infinitely expanded headroom.

This Testarossa convertible is on offer from Paris Prestige Cars, a French dealer of high-end sports cars, and it’s a rare convertible example of one of Ferrari’s most popular models.

Continue reading to learn more about this Ferrari Testarossa Convertible.

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