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Ferrari Is Set To Race In Burgundy For Its 1000th Grand Prix This Weekend

Ferrari Is Set To Race In Burgundy For Its 1000th Grand Prix This Weekend

The Scuderia’s two SF1000s will feature unique burgundy red liveries during the Tuscan Grand Prix

Ferrari is one of the world’s most recognizable brands and, as a carmaker, the Prancing Horse is synonymous with some of the world’s finest super sports cars, supercars, and hypercars. The heritage, built over the past seven decades, is intimately linked to the world of racing and, more importantly, with Formula 1. This weekend, the Tuscan hills surrounding the popular Mugello Circuit will be filled by the roar of Formula 1, and as it happens, this will be the Scuderia’s 1,000th World Championship round they will partake in. The Italians had to mark the special moment somehow and chose to do so by unveiling a new livery that’s reminiscent of the first Ferraris to race in F1 back in 1950.

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This Spa-Winning Ferrari 550 GT1 Is The Most Expensive Car Sold At An Online Auction Ever

This Spa-Winning Ferrari 550 GT1 Is The Most Expensive Car Sold At An Online Auction Ever

The RM/Sotheby’s Shift/Monterey sale remained within the bounds of the virtual world but the eye-watering price of this Ferrari is very real

Pedigree is what sells a racing car and this Ferrari 550 GT1 from the noughties is bathing in pedigree as the last V-12-engined Ferrari to win a high-profile 24-hour race and one of only 12 of its kind to be built by Prodrive in the UK.

No wonder, then, that this car became the most expensive car ever to be sold at an online-only auction after going for just under $4.3 million during the Shift/Monterey RM/Sotheby’s auction that replaced the auction house’s now traditional Monterey Car Week auction.

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Ferrari Is The Latest Indy Hopeful

Ferrari Is The Latest Indy Hopeful

The Italian supercar maker confirmed that it’s evaluating a factory-backed program in the NTT IndyCar Series

Ferrari, the most celebrated manufacturer in the history of the Formula 1 World Championship, a winner of 16 Constructors’ Championships and 15 Drivers’ Championships, hasn’t raced at the Brickyard since the ’50s but this may be about to change as the suits in Maranello are apparently considering to expand the team’s activity across the Atlantic and enter the NTT IndyCar Series sometime after the new rules come into effect in 2022.

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Car For Sale: 2005 Ferrari 575 GTC Evoluzione

Car For Sale: 2005 Ferrari 575 GTC Evoluzione

The last front-engined, V-12 Ferrari racing car

The Ferrari 575 GTC Evoluzione is a gorgeous, loud, and fast beast. It also heralded the end of an era for Ferrari as the last race car to come out of Maranello powered by a V-12 engine. What is more, Ferrari never built another GT1 car nor has there been a front-engined Ferrari on the race tracks of the world since the 575 and its sibling, the 550 Maranello, retired from top-level competition at the tail end of the noughties. Can you hear the fat lady’s song over the roar of the V-12?

It was all back in the early ’70s that Ferrari finally decided to pour the bulk of its resources into the F1 program and thus curtail its works-backed participation in top-level sports car endurance racing, bringing to an end an era that saw the Prancing Horse gallop to the top step of the podium at Le Mans a record nine times in just 16 years. But Ferraris kept racing in long-distance events and this, the 575 GTC, was Ferrari’s official answer to the re-born GT1 class a decade and a half ago.

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2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

Ferrari revives our inner detective with latest update of its GT3 racer

You may not know it upon first glance, but this is the new-for-2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 Evo. Yes, Ferrari decided against building a GT3-spec F8 Tributo, and instead, Michelotto was tasked with updating the 488 GT3.Over 18,000 hours of calculations and CFD simulations went into it, and it now has a longer wheelbase following in the footsteps of the GTE car. Power stays at about 500-550 horsepower as per GT3 regulations, but the car will now be faster in the corners and more stable. Ferrari was also thoughtful enough to include an ’Endurance’ package that works hand in hand with the new ECU, supposedly making the car more reliable and smoother.

Look across Ferrari’s fence and into Mercedes-AMG’s yard, and you’ll see the comprehensively updated AMG GT-based GT3 car. You can’t miss that humongous, viperfish-like grille in the front in much the same way you can’t overlook the overhauled Porsche 911 GT3.R. That one, while still an offspring of the 991 generation, is a different beast from the original unveiled in 2015. But Ferrari isn’t one to bankroll a new racing car that easily. So, Ferrari Corse Clienti customers will have to make do with this. It should be good since Russian squad SMP Racing almost won the European Blancpain Endurance Cup this year with the old car, but just how well will it measure up against its competition?

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2020 Ferrari 488 Challenge Evo

2020 Ferrari 488 Challenge Evo

There’s a new track beast huffing and puffing in Maranello

Ferrari has just lifted the wraps off its 2020 488 Challenge Evo. The new track-ready speed machine is described as an improvement in aerodynamics first and foremost, with teams now allowed to alter the level of downforce on the front axle independently of the rear axle. On top of that, the Evo comes with a souped-up body kit and looks sharper than ever. Stay close as we walk you through everything you need to know about the 2020 Ferrari 488 Challenge Evo.

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Ford vs. Ferrari Trailer 2 - Lots of Racing Drama

Ford vs. Ferrari Trailer 2 - Lots of Racing Drama

Go like hell, indeed, folks!

20th Century Fox’s upcoming Ford vs. Ferrari movie is shaping up to be a barn burner. The second trailer of the James Mangold-directed film has just dropped, and if you don’t get excited about the movie after watching it, then I don’t know what to tell you. The movie, which stars Matt Damon, Christian Bale, Jon Bernthal, and Catriona Balfe, sheds a unique spotlight on the iconic racing war Ford and Ferrari engaged in back in the 1960s for Le Mans supremacy.

The new trailer dives deep into Ford’s singular focus and motivation to wipe out Ferrari’s dominance in the endurance race after a deal between the two automakers went south in the 11th hour. There’s a lot to unpack with the second trailer, though I’d be remiss if I didn’t say that despite the collective star power in the movie featuring several Hollywood A-listers, the true stars of the trailer are the Ford GT40 and the Ferrari 330 P3.

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This Blue F40 LM Is The Best Belated Christmas Gift Money Can Buy

This Blue F40 LM Is The Best Belated Christmas Gift Money Can Buy

As one of only 19 F40 LMs ever built, it is expected to fetch a few millions at auction

By the time its production cycle had ended, in 1992, the F40 was officially the most successful car ever built by Ferrari with over 1,300 units sold in its five-year lifespan. It’s now an icon of the Prancing Horse and, while prices tip over $1 million, you can still find one quite easily, although U.S. spec examples are rarer. Still, the street-going F40 has nothing on one of these: the ultra-rare, ultra-insane, F40 LM that was built for that famous old race in France.

Ferrari released the outrageously under-equipped F40 in 1987 to mark the company’s 40th anniversary. It was the fastest road-going car at the moment of its debut with a top speed of 201 mph, breaking that much-lamented 200 mph mark, and the last Ferrari to be given the blessing ’The Drake’ himself.

With such extreme specs, it wasn’t long before the F40 would hit the track, although Ferrari didn’t originally intend for it to happen. It first raced Stateside in the IMSA GT series before also competing in the Italian GT Championship and, more prominently, in the BPR Global GT Series of the mid-’90s, by which time the production version was relaxing in retirement for a few years already.

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1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

A classic open-top Prancing Horse, ready for export

The Ferrari 340 America was the first model in the America series conceived with export in mind, used as a means to increase Ferrari’s footprint in the United States. The 340 featured a brand-new Lampredi V-12 which made its way to Formula 1, with this particular car racing at Le Mans twice in the early ’50s.

The Ferrari America series was launched at the dawn of the ’50s to appeal to American customers who wanted less rugged interior premises, bigger engines, and more performance. The first car of this lineage was the 340 America, which debuted at the 1950 Paris Motor Show in full racing trim. Granted, most Ferraris back then were as much race cars as they were road cars, but a customer could personalize his car to be more friendly on the road with softer suspension, different gearbox ratios, or new engine settings.

As this is a Ferrari from the early days of the company, it was made in very few numbers, on order from importers or customers. Barely 23 cars were completed between 1950 and 1952, with three coachbuilders taking care of the body. Carrozzeria Touring built six Barchetta and two Berlinetta bodies, Vignale crafted five Spyder bodies, five Berlinetta bodies, and one larger Convertible, while Ghia built only four fixed-head Coupes.

The car seen here is chassis #0116/A, the third 340 America built, and one of the 6 Barchettas by Touring. It ran briefly in period, its highlights being a couple of entries in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Owner Pierre-Louis Dreyfus shared the car in 1951 with well-known Grand Prix driver Louis Chiron and, in 1952, Rene Dreyfus. While the car didn’t reach the finish line on either occasion, it went on to sell for $8,430,000 during the 2016 RM Sotheby’s auction in Monaco.

Read on to understand why the 340 America commands such high prices.

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Check Out this Ferrari-Powered, Road-Legal F1 Car

Check Out this Ferrari-Powered, Road-Legal F1 Car

It’s about as close to driving an F1 car on the road as you can get

The latest machine to be dubbed an "F1 car for the road" is Zac Mihajlovic’s bespoke, Ferrari-powered single-seater, and it might be the closest one to the real deal we’ve ever seen. It will go into production if Mihajlovic finds customers for his ludicrous creation.

Remember the Caparo T1? What about the Bac Mono? What about Gordon Murray’s LCC Rocket from 1992? All of these were, at one moment in time, referenced as "F1 cars for the road". They had one seat, little pieces of fiberglass or aluminum to cover the wheels, and they were very, very fast. But, none of them really looked like an F1 car does.

Even Ford jumped on the bandwagon in 2012 when they brought to the Paris Motor Show a Formula Ford car fit for everyday roads. It had a 1.0-liter, Ecoboost engine and could lap the Nurburgring-Nordschleife in 7:22, but the limited production run of 20 to 40 units never happened.

Now, someone finally wants to make it happen. Mihajlovic previously built, with painstaking attention to detail, a replica of the Batmobile featured in the 1989 Batman with Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson. His credentials are set.

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Michael Schumacher's Formula One Race Car Sells For $7.5 Million

Michael Schumacher’s Formula One Race Car Sells For $7.5 Million

The legacy of German icon still looms large over the whole sport

Michael Schumacher is still regarded as the greatest Formula One driver in history. The maestro holds a long list of records, including most championships won (7), most race wins (91), and most podium finishes (155). Now we can add “driver of the most expensive modern Formula One racing car ever sold at an auction” to that list. $7.5 million. That’s how much a Ferrari F2001, the same race car that Schumacher drove to romp his way to the 2001 World Championship, sold for that amount at the RM Sotheby’s auction in New York late last week. The legend of Schumi continues.

All the same, the Ferrari F2001 is arguably the most sought-after Formula One race car of this century. Not only did it help Schumacher win the 2001 driver’s title by a whopping 58 points (123 - 65) over runner-up David Coulthard, it also spearheaded the Prancing Horse’s dominance throughout the season, which saw the Italian team finish on the podium in all 17 races. The specific car that was up for auction contributed heavily to the team’s championship cause since it’s the same one that Schumacher drove at the Monaco and Hungary Grand Prix, winning both on his way to his fourth world championship. Given its provenance, it’s not surprising that the car sold for exactly $7,504,000, far exceeding the $5 million estimate the auction house placed on it. It also blew the existing record for most expensive modern F1 car to sell at an auction, displacing the $3.2 million Ferrari F2004 that RM Sotheby’s sold back in 2005. It’s hard to imagine another modern Formula One Car fetching that kind of price at an auction in the foreseeable future, at least unless either Lewis Hamilton or Sebastian Vettel start closing in on all of Schumacher’s records. For now, the Ferrari F2001 can lay claim to the title of most expensive modern Formula One car in history. 16 years after its dominant run in 2001, it’s still setting records like a boss.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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Is Ferrari Really Serious About Quitting Formula One?

Is Ferrari Really Serious About Quitting Formula One?

It could happen if the current engine proposals are approved

Liberty Media’s plan to reshape Formula One in the competitive image it wants is already getting some blowback from some of the sport’s top teams and, to no one’s surprise, Ferrari is right in the middle of it. Worse, Ferrari isn’t just up-in-arms over Liberty’s plans. To be more specific Ferrari is up-in-arms over the engine proposals set for 2021 - so much so that it’s actually threatening to quit the sport entirely if the proposals are enacted. Yep. Imagine Formula One without Ferrari in it. You can’t? Well, neither can I because that’d be like Major League Baseball not having the New York Yankees or the NBA suddenly finding itself without the Los Angeles Lakers. It’s unfathomable to think about and yet, Ferrari president Sergio Marchionne has made no bones about his plans to take the Prancing Horse out of the sport if the new proposals did not “deliver a platform that was beneficial to Ferrari’s brand and its marketplace.”

The big issue that has Ferrari questioning its motivations to continue racing in Formula One involves the aforementioned engine proposal. And, in a weird twist, it’s not the only high-profile team to voice its objections. Mercedes-Benz and Renault are also concerned about the engine proposal and while neither has threatened to quit the sport entirely like Ferrari just did, it speaks to the significance of the issue that these three teams are in unison in voicing their displeasure over the proposal. For his part, Marchionne isn’t mincing his words regarding the automaker’s position. "I understand that Liberty may have taken these into account in coming up with their views, but I think it needs to be absolutely clear that unless we find a set of circumstances, the results of which are beneficial to the maintenance of the brand, and the marketplace, and to the strengthening of the unique position for Ferrari, Ferrari will not play."

Continue reading for the full story.

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Petrolicious Profiles The Ferrari 250 LM: Video

Petrolicious Profiles The Ferrari 250 LM: Video

Indulge in the beauty of a Prancing Horse race legend

“I could stare at that car forever,” begins Remo Ferri, owner of the gorgeous 250 LM you see here. One look is all you’ll need to understand – this Ferrari is mechanical, an instrument for speed shaped into art. Lift the rear clamshell, and the feeling of craftsmanship is palpable. There’s a certain kind of purity to it, a characteristic most obvious when sitting in the stripped-down cockpit with the loud pedal pinned. This is a car that only offers what you need to go fast. Plucked from the ‘60s-era of sports car racing, the 250 LM was one of Ferrari’s first mid-engine sports cars. The body is made from aluminum, and with 320 horsepower properly routed to the rear axle, it could reach a top speed of 180 mph, a staggering figure for its day, and enough to clinch a win at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1965. This is also one of the most expensive cars in the world, but it’s about a lot more than just money. In this sub-six-minute video, Petrolicious dives straight to the heart of the matter, taking the audience for a ride through stunning cinematography and passionate narration, all while the sound of that V-12 rampaging down the straight creates copious aural intoxication.

The passion of the car’s owner is infectious, and over the course of the video, it becomes obvious why this is considered one of the most valuable cars in the world. Never mind the limited production, never mind the pedigree, never mind the badge. Just look at it, take in its curving lines, absorb the sound it makes, and it’ll all become crystal clear. This is one of the greatest Ferraris ever made, and indeed, one of the greatest cars ever created.

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In-Car Footage of Ferrari 488 Challenge Crash Hits Us Right in the Feels

In-Car Footage of Ferrari 488 Challenge Crash Hits Us Right in the Feels

This isn’t how you’re supposed to race something with the iconic Challenge badge :(

I think back to the days before I could drive… to the days when my only real experience behind the wheel involved sitting in front of a big-at-the-time-screen TV playing the very first Gran Turismo on my Playstation. I was just 13 years old when the game came out, and maybe I had taken a few short joyrides before that point in life, but nothing like grabbing the wheel, slapping the pedals, and shifting gears like I would learn to love later in life. As such, going to the races with my old man meant dragging out the cooler, grabbing some food and beer, and spending the day at the track. For him, it was all about the sport, the driver, the man who reigned supreme on that day. For me, it was more about seeing the cars crash. Of course, that was back before I could really appreciate what a travesty this can be when it happens to the wrong cars, but when you’re young, that’s the most entertaining part. Fast forward to today, and seeing a $300,000-plus makes my manhood hurt, my heart stop, and my eyes tear up. After all, seeing a beautiful exotic meet its maker isn’t exactly for someone with a weak stomach.

And, that brings me to the very sad reason that I’m here talking to you today. As we moved from September into October, the Ferrari Challenge kicked off at Homestead Miami Speedway down in beautiful Florida. When you consider the disaster caused by Hurricane Irma just weeks ago, it’s amazing that we are even lucky enough to see some of the finest exotics in the world take to the track. In this case, I’m talking about the Ferrari 488 Challenge,a car that is success none other than the Ferrari 458 Challenge, F430 Challenge, 360 Challenge, F355 Challenge, and the very first Ferrari 348 Challenge that graced the track from 1993 to 1995. Needless to say, the 488 Challenge has some serious proteins in his DNA. But that didn’t stop a rather unfortunate and unhappy accident during the Ferrari Challenge. Fortunately, the drivers of the two cars involved were okay (so we’re told, anyway) but as you’ll see from this amazing in-car footage that in itself is a miracle. Click on the “Read More” button to see the short video for yourself and learn more about not only the 488 Challenge but Homestead Miami Speedway as well.

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Lego's Genius Knows No Bounds With Life-Sized Ferrari SF70H

Lego’s Genius Knows No Bounds With Life-Sized Ferrari SF70H

And we thought the life-sized McLaren 720S was awesome...

I’m running out of superlatives to describe Lego. Really, I thought I had reached my limit when the company unveiled the life-size Lego version of the Mclaren 720S at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in July. Turns out, I was dead wrong because Lego, in all its genius, has found a way to raise its own bar yet again. Feast your eyes on this beauty, a life-sized version of Ferrari’s 2017 Formula One Race car, or as it’s otherwise known in F1 circles, the SF70H.

If the mere sight of the completed work isn’t enough to make your eyes pop out, the facts about this creation are certainly going to do it. According to Lego, every crevice of the model is made out of the studded plastic bricks, right down to the wheels, tires, and even the control knobs and gear switches on the car’s steering wheel. All in all, the model features a staggering 349,911 specific pieces. To put that in perspective, the aforementioned life-sized McLaren 720S that was presented at the Goodwood Festival of Speed “only” had 267,300 specific pieces. Adding to the ridiculousness of Lego version of the Ferrari SF70H is the fact that the whole model weighs 1,250 pounds, which is close to the actual weight of the SF70H.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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Michael Fassbender Joins A Long List Of Hollywood Stars To Jump Into Motor Racing

Michael Fassbender Joins A Long List Of Hollywood Stars To Jump Into Motor Racing

It’s not a shock knowing he counts Michael Schumacher as one of his heroes

Paul Newman. Steve McQueen. James Dean. Patrick Dempsey. Even Caitlyn Jenner when she was still Bruce Jenner. All these Hollywood stars have taken their talents to the track to varying degrees of success. Newman, for instance, competed at the 1979 24 Hours of Le Mans, winning his class and finishing second overall on board a Porsche 935 that sold last August for a whopping $4.84 million. Well, another actor is joining them in this exclusive club and he’s going to race for an automaker with arguably the most storied history in motor racing.

We may know him more as Magneto from the X-Men movie franchise, but Michael Fassbender is more than just an actor playing a mutant with a penchant for controlling metals. Now we can also call him a full-fledged race car driver after competing at a recent Ferrari Challenge series race at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca. If the thought of seeing Fassbender in a Ferrari racing suit is jarring, we might as well start getting used to it because the 40-year old German actor showed enough potential to finish 11th in his class and 17th overall in his first race over the weekend. His pace them improved in the second race of the series where he finished sixth in his class and 14th overall. Moving forward, Fassbender is expected to compete in the next round of the North American Ferrari Challenge series, which will be held in Montreal from June 9 to June 11.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2017 Ferrari 488 Challenge

2017 Ferrari 488 Challenge

The third racing version of the 488 GTB hits the track in the Ferrari Challenge series

Unveiled in 2015, the Ferrari 488 GTB replaced the successful and still very potent 458 Italia in the lineup. Although the new sports car isn’t radically different than its predecessor, it created a small revolution in Maranello’s lineage of entry-level supercars by introducing the turbocharged engine. Arguably the most important upgrade, the force-fed, 3.9-liter V-8, replaced the iconic, naturally aspirated 4.5-liter V-12. Like its predecessor, the 488 received a convertible version (Spider), as well as two racing variants for international motorsport series, GTE and GT3. For 2017, the 488 also replaced the 458 Challenge in the company’s one-make racing series.

Unveiled at the Ferrari World Finals event in Daytona in December 2016, the 488 Challenge is the sixth model to participate in the one-make series. Set to celebrate its 25th anniversary in 2017, the Ferrari Challenge was established in 1992 and has so far, used Challenge-spec versions of the 348, F355, 360, F430, and 458. Having hosted over 1,000 races, with over 1,000 drivers taking part in up to three series organised on three continents, the Ferrari Challenge series has proved to be an ideal starting point for drivers looking to compete in international GT and prototype championships. Needless to say, it’s not surprising that Ferrari was so quick to replace the 458 Italia with the faster and more aerodynamic 488 GTB in the one-make racing series.

The new Ferrari 488 Challenge will make its North American track debut in January 2017 at the Daytona International Speedway. The Ferrari Challenge North America season will also include races at Sonoma Raceway, Circuit of the Americas, Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Lime Rock Park, and Homestead-Miami Speedway.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 Challenge.

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Ferrari Teases Its 2016 Formula One Engine: Video

Ferrari Teases Its 2016 Formula One Engine: Video

High-revving power ready to compete

With the 2016 F1 pre-season approaching, the Ferrari team is working diligently in preparation at the Ferrari factory in Maranello. In what seems like a small celebration, the team released a video showcasing engineers and their equipment, culminating in raucous engine sounds from the F1 racer.

The noises come from a turbocharged 1.6-liter V-6. New F1 regulations specify that a separate exhaust wastegate must be used, all in an effort to make the cars sound better. Ferrari is clearly proud of their results. The gasoline engine isn’t the only thing propelling Ferrari’s F1 car as two motor generators supplement the power. This helps deliver instant torque while conserving fuel lap after lap.

Sadly, the video doesn’t show the engine itself, or of specific dynamometer numbers. It’s a sure bed Ferrari likes to keep that information under wraps. On the other hand, it is widely known that Ferrari has an impressive driver team for 2016. Kimi Raikkonen and Sebastian Vettel – the 2007 world champion and four-time title winner, respectively – will be taking on F1’s greatest teams, including Lewis Hamilton and his Mercedes team.

Stay tuned to TopSpeed for more coverage of the 2016 Formula One season.

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1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti Fetches Almost $36 Million In Auction

1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti Fetches Almost $36 Million In Auction

Iconic Ferrari racer becomes one of the most expensive Ferraris in history

The highly anticipated auction of a 1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti finally went down, and true to form, it fetched an incredible amount that even surpassed what auction house Artcurial Motorcars Retromobile thought it would go for. Valued between $30 to $34 million, the 335 S sold for a staggering $35,711,359, narrowly missing out on the record $38 million a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta went for at a Bonhams auction in August 2014. The auction took place on Saturday, February 8, 2016 in Paris, France.

Even if it didn’t capture that record specifically, the 1957 335 S will forever be remembered as one of the most expensive Ferraris to have ever been sold. It certainly had one of the highest starting bids on record at $22.3 million. But even at that price, collectors immediately pounced on the rare Ferrari, bidding its value up to $29 million in a matter of seconds. Finally, a bidder – identified merely as an “international bidder” – laid down the final gauntlet with a $35.7 million bid, thus ending one of the most memorable auctions ever hosted by Artcurial.

The identity of the winning bidder is being kept anonymous for obvious reasons, but according to Matthieu Lamoure, director general of Artcurial motorcars, the buyer is based here in the U.S. Whoever he is, he’s taking ownership of a car that has arguably one of the most eventful histories of any Ferrari race car.

It began its racing career in 1957 when it competed in the Sebring 12 Hours event of that year, finishing sixth overall. From there, it lined up at the 1957 Mille Miglia where it got entangled in a horrific crash that killed 12 people. The aftermath of that incident forced organizers to permanently cancel the race after 1957, thus earning the 335 S the distinction of being the car that shut down the iconic endurance race. Despite having that label attached to it, the 335 S also earned recognition in its day for being the first model in history to record an average lap speed of over 124 mph at the Le Mans 24 Hours.

Since then, the car has shuffled among a few owners, most notably Pennsylvania architect Robert N. Dusek and the late French racing driver Pierre Bardinon.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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1996 Ferrari F50 GT

1996 Ferrari F50 GT

In 1984, Ferrari took the world by surprise when it revived the iconic GTO nameplate with a V-8-powered sports car. Developed as a homologation special based on the 308 GTB, the 288 GTO ultimately became Ferrari’s range-topping model between 1984 and 1987, and unlike its predecessor, it carried a twin-turbo V-8 behind the seats instead of a naturally aspirated V-12. The V-8 legacy continued with the mind-boggling F40 between 1987 and the mid-1990s, but Maranello went back to the high-revving V-12 with the F50 in 1995.

Significantly more exclusive than the F40, the F50 was built in only 349 units over two years and hit the streets with a 4.7-liter V-12 under the hood. The powerplant was based on the 333 SP’s, a race car built by Dallara that marked Ferrari’s official return to sports car racing after a 20-year absence in 1994.

But despite using a racing engine, the F50 never made it onto the track. While Ferrari developed a race-spec version to replace the F40 LM and Evoluzione, the project was cancelled as the Italians were unhappy with the FIA having allowed homologation specials such as the Porsche 911 GT1 join the BPR Global GT Series. The said race car was called the F50 GT and continued its life as a very exclusive road-legal vehicle sold to select customers. A sad yet interesting story, more of which you’ll find out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F50 GT.

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1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti

1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti

With an estimated auction price of $30 to $34 million, the Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti could become one of the most expensice cars in the world

In the early days of Ferrari being a carmaker in addition to a racing team, cars were evolving so quickly that Ferrari would end up developing two different cars just for the 1957 Mille Miglia. The first of these was the 315 S, built at the beginning of 1957. But Ferrari was unable to make it all of the way to the Mille Miglia in May without fiddling with it, and the 335 S would end up being brought out before the race. Both cars are in fact evolved versions of the 290 MM, and cosmetically they are practically identical.

The 335 S has a bit of a dark history. When it raced at the 1957 Mille Miglia, a blow tire caused one of the car to careen off the road and into a crowd of spectators. The driver, co-driver and 10 spectators (5 of them children) were killed in the crash. With this accident coming just two years after the even more horrific 1955 Le Mans disaster, public outcry shut down the race after 1957, making the 335 S the last Ferrari build specifically for this event. But despite the grizzly association, the 335 S is today one of the most valuable cars in the world.

Updated 02/08/2016: The highly anticipated auction of a 1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti finally went down, and true to form, it fetched an incredible amount that even surpassed what auction house Artcurial Motorcars Retromobile thought it would go for. Valued between $30 to $34 million, the 335 S sold for a staggering $35,711,359 - making it one of the most expensive Ferrari in history.

Note: Image credit: Artcurial Motorcars / Christian Martin

Continue reading to learn more about the 1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti.

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