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2021 Ferrari 488 GT Modificata

2021 Ferrari 488 GT Modificata

The Ferrari GT Modificata is a race-spec 488 GTE for customer use. But you still can’t buy it

The 2021 Ferrari 488 GT Modificata is a track-only version of the 488 GTB. A limited-edition model dedicated to customers who like to drive Ferraris on the race track, the 488 GT Modificata features technology developed for the competition-spec 488 GT3 and 488 GTE cars.

It’s basically the third race-spec model based on the 488 GTB road car, which has been replaced by the F8 Tributo in 2020. Essentially a successor to the Ferrari 488 Challenge, the 2021 488 GT Modificata will initially be offered to customers who in recent years have participated in Competizioni GT and Club Competizioni GT events. How fast is it and what sets it apart? Find out in our review.

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2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

Ferrari revives our inner detective with latest update of its GT3 racer

You may not know it upon first glance, but this is the new-for-2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 Evo. Yes, Ferrari decided against building a GT3-spec F8 Tributo, and instead, Michelotto was tasked with updating the 488 GT3.Over 18,000 hours of calculations and CFD simulations went into it, and it now has a longer wheelbase following in the footsteps of the GTE car. Power stays at about 500-550 horsepower as per GT3 regulations, but the car will now be faster in the corners and more stable. Ferrari was also thoughtful enough to include an ’Endurance’ package that works hand in hand with the new ECU, supposedly making the car more reliable and smoother.

Look across Ferrari’s fence and into Mercedes-AMG’s yard, and you’ll see the comprehensively updated AMG GT-based GT3 car. You can’t miss that humongous, viperfish-like grille in the front in much the same way you can’t overlook the overhauled Porsche 911 GT3.R. That one, while still an offspring of the 991 generation, is a different beast from the original unveiled in 2015. But Ferrari isn’t one to bankroll a new racing car that easily. So, Ferrari Corse Clienti customers will have to make do with this. It should be good since Russian squad SMP Racing almost won the European Blancpain Endurance Cup this year with the old car, but just how well will it measure up against its competition?

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1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

A classic open-top Prancing Horse, ready for export

The Ferrari 340 America was the first model in the America series conceived with export in mind, used as a means to increase Ferrari’s footprint in the United States. The 340 featured a brand-new Lampredi V-12 which made its way to Formula 1, with this particular car racing at Le Mans twice in the early ’50s.

The Ferrari America series was launched at the dawn of the ’50s to appeal to American customers who wanted less rugged interior premises, bigger engines, and more performance. The first car of this lineage was the 340 America, which debuted at the 1950 Paris Motor Show in full racing trim. Granted, most Ferraris back then were as much race cars as they were road cars, but a customer could personalize his car to be more friendly on the road with softer suspension, different gearbox ratios, or new engine settings.

As this is a Ferrari from the early days of the company, it was made in very few numbers, on order from importers or customers. Barely 23 cars were completed between 1950 and 1952, with three coachbuilders taking care of the body. Carrozzeria Touring built six Barchetta and two Berlinetta bodies, Vignale crafted five Spyder bodies, five Berlinetta bodies, and one larger Convertible, while Ghia built only four fixed-head Coupes.

The car seen here is chassis #0116/A, the third 340 America built, and one of the 6 Barchettas by Touring. It ran briefly in period, its highlights being a couple of entries in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Owner Pierre-Louis Dreyfus shared the car in 1951 with well-known Grand Prix driver Louis Chiron and, in 1952, Rene Dreyfus. While the car didn’t reach the finish line on either occasion, it went on to sell for $8,430,000 during the 2016 RM Sotheby’s auction in Monaco.

Read on to understand why the 340 America commands such high prices.

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2017 Ferrari 488 Challenge

2017 Ferrari 488 Challenge

The third racing version of the 488 GTB hits the track in the Ferrari Challenge series

Unveiled in 2015, the Ferrari 488 GTB replaced the successful and still very potent 458 Italia in the lineup. Although the new sports car isn’t radically different than its predecessor, it created a small revolution in Maranello’s lineage of entry-level supercars by introducing the turbocharged engine. Arguably the most important upgrade, the force-fed, 3.9-liter V-8, replaced the iconic, naturally aspirated 4.5-liter V-12. Like its predecessor, the 488 received a convertible version (Spider), as well as two racing variants for international motorsport series, GTE and GT3. For 2017, the 488 also replaced the 458 Challenge in the company’s one-make racing series.

Unveiled at the Ferrari World Finals event in Daytona in December 2016, the 488 Challenge is the sixth model to participate in the one-make series. Set to celebrate its 25th anniversary in 2017, the Ferrari Challenge was established in 1992 and has so far, used Challenge-spec versions of the 348, F355, 360, F430, and 458. Having hosted over 1,000 races, with over 1,000 drivers taking part in up to three series organised on three continents, the Ferrari Challenge series has proved to be an ideal starting point for drivers looking to compete in international GT and prototype championships. Needless to say, it’s not surprising that Ferrari was so quick to replace the 458 Italia with the faster and more aerodynamic 488 GTB in the one-make racing series.

The new Ferrari 488 Challenge will make its North American track debut in January 2017 at the Daytona International Speedway. The Ferrari Challenge North America season will also include races at Sonoma Raceway, Circuit of the Americas, Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Lime Rock Park, and Homestead-Miami Speedway.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 Challenge.

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1996 Ferrari F50 GT

1996 Ferrari F50 GT

In 1984, Ferrari took the world by surprise when it revived the iconic GTO nameplate with a V-8-powered sports car. Developed as a homologation special based on the 308 GTB, the 288 GTO ultimately became Ferrari’s range-topping model between 1984 and 1987, and unlike its predecessor, it carried a twin-turbo V-8 behind the seats instead of a naturally aspirated V-12. The V-8 legacy continued with the mind-boggling F40 between 1987 and the mid-1990s, but Maranello went back to the high-revving V-12 with the F50 in 1995.

Significantly more exclusive than the F40, the F50 was built in only 349 units over two years and hit the streets with a 4.7-liter V-12 under the hood. The powerplant was based on the 333 SP’s, a race car built by Dallara that marked Ferrari’s official return to sports car racing after a 20-year absence in 1994.

But despite using a racing engine, the F50 never made it onto the track. While Ferrari developed a race-spec version to replace the F40 LM and Evoluzione, the project was cancelled as the Italians were unhappy with the FIA having allowed homologation specials such as the Porsche 911 GT1 join the BPR Global GT Series. The said race car was called the F50 GT and continued its life as a very exclusive road-legal vehicle sold to select customers. A sad yet interesting story, more of which you’ll find out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F50 GT.

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1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti

1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti

With an estimated auction price of $30 to $34 million, the Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti could become one of the most expensice cars in the world

In the early days of Ferrari being a carmaker in addition to a racing team, cars were evolving so quickly that Ferrari would end up developing two different cars just for the 1957 Mille Miglia. The first of these was the 315 S, built at the beginning of 1957. But Ferrari was unable to make it all of the way to the Mille Miglia in May without fiddling with it, and the 335 S would end up being brought out before the race. Both cars are in fact evolved versions of the 290 MM, and cosmetically they are practically identical.

The 335 S has a bit of a dark history. When it raced at the 1957 Mille Miglia, a blow tire caused one of the car to careen off the road and into a crowd of spectators. The driver, co-driver and 10 spectators (5 of them children) were killed in the crash. With this accident coming just two years after the even more horrific 1955 Le Mans disaster, public outcry shut down the race after 1957, making the 335 S the last Ferrari build specifically for this event. But despite the grizzly association, the 335 S is today one of the most valuable cars in the world.

Updated 02/08/2016: The highly anticipated auction of a 1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti finally went down, and true to form, it fetched an incredible amount that even surpassed what auction house Artcurial Motorcars Retromobile thought it would go for. Valued between $30 to $34 million, the 335 S sold for a staggering $35,711,359 - making it one of the most expensive Ferrari in history.

Note: Image credit: Artcurial Motorcars / Christian Martin

Continue reading to learn more about the 1957 Ferrari 335 S Spider Scaglietti.

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1956 Ferrari 290 MM

1956 Ferrari 290 MM

As the FIA was preparing to gather the most important sports car, endurance, and road racing events in Europe and North America under the World Sportscar Championship banner, Ferrari shifted from using the Colombo-design V-12 engine in its smaller racers to a new family of four-cylinder units Aurelio Lampredi developed for Formula One. Thus the Ferrari Monza series was born, which included models such as the 625 TF, 500 TR, and the 860 Monza.

With the larger 340 MM, 375 MM, and 375 Plus backed by the Monzas, Ferrari was able to sweep the first two runnings of the World Sportscar Championship against competition from Jaguar, Aston Martin, and Lancia. Things changed, however, in 1955, when Mercedes-Benz introduced the 300 SLR — the race car that went on to win the championship in its maiden season. Having won only one race in 1955, Ferrari commissioned Vitorio Jano to develop a new V-12 engine for the lightweight 860 Monza. Maranello replaced the four-banger with a 3.5-liter V-12 and the car was renamed the 290 MM.

Raced alongside other Ferraris, the 290 MM helped the Scuderia win the World Sportscar Championship in both 1956 and 1957 before being replaced by the infamous 250 Testa Rossa.

Often overshadowed by the fact that it was built in a transition period for Maranello, the 290 MM is arguably one of the most important Ferraris of the mid-1950s, especially for enabling the Italians to win against iconic race cars such as the Maserati 300S and Jaguar D-Type.

Updated 12/11/2015: A very unique 1956 Ferrari driven by Formula 1 world champion Juan Manuel Fangio was sold at RM Sotheby’s Drive by Disruption sale in New York on December 10th, 2015.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 290 MM by Scaglietti.

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1953 Ferrari 340 MM

1953 Ferrari 340 MM

Back in the days when Ferrari developed engines quicker than they could do gearboxes or bodies, as per Enzo’s belief that those who rely on aerodynamics can’t put together proper engines, many memorable roadsters were built using the 4.0-liter Lampredi V-12 as the centerpiece. Other configurations sprouted from this 1951-designed powerplant as the company continued to use this layout all throughout the decade. One of the most emblematic models of the 340 series is the 340 MM, which appeared as an evolution of previous 340 iterations in 1953.

As with other Ferrari cars, MM stood for Mille Miglia, the race for which the car was originally conceived and which its forerunner, the 340 America, had won in 1951. In truth, the MM was the real replacement of the America, being a real step forward from the so-called 340 Mexico from which it evolved.

With only 11 examples built, the 340 MM is an extremely rare car, especially since both Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera and Carrozzeria Vignale dealt with building spyder bodies while Pininfarina crafted the coupes. This means that nearly each example is unique in its own way. Couple this with the racing history of certain chassis and you get part of the reasoning behind the prices for which these cars change hands. One of the many in the myriad of Ferrari ultra-exotic rarities.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1953 Ferrari 340 MM Competition Vignale Spider.

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1953 - 1955 Ferrari 375 Plus

1953 - 1955 Ferrari 375 Plus

Nowadays, when you associate Ferrari and motorsport, your mind immediately skips to Formula 1 – the only championship where the Scuderia runs officially. Little over six decades ago, when Ferrari was still a low-volume manufacturer, the Modena-based team would consistently run in both open-wheel and closed bodywork formulas, and their works drivers split between the chores. One such success story away from the dazzling world of F1 is the Ferrari 375 Plus which built on the lessons learned by the factory during the 1953 race season, hence the Plus in the name.

The car, in spite of its short lease of life in works-supported competition, proved to be a force to be reckoned with, even in the company of the newly-launched Jaguar D-Type that went on to become a true legend while history has been far more harsh on the 375 Plus which wasn’t much less of a car. The facts back this statement, as a Le Mans and Carerra Panamericana-winner cannot be considered a bad contender.

Designed during the big-engine era of the World Sports Car Championship, the 375 Plus proved a bit hefty when compared to its direct competition from Jaguar, Maserati and Lancia. The car was routinely out-handled by Lancia’s D24 as well as the D-Type which was famously equipped with disc brakes. But, the brute from Modena never gave up without a proper fight, bringing to the table its gargantuan amounts of power from the meaty 4.9-liter V12 engine.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1954 Ferrari 375 Plus.

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1947 Ferrari 125 S

1947 Ferrari 125 S

Although Enzo Ferrari founded the Scuderia Ferrari as early as 1929, the company took nearly two decades to develop its first race car. After preparing and fielding Alfa Romeo race cars for amateur drivers, as well as heading up the brand’s racing division, Enzo Ferrari left the Italian company in 1939 and founded Auto Avio Costruzioni. The new company launched the Tipo 815 race car in 1940, but the vehicle saw little competition due to World War II. During the conflict, Ferrari’s factory was bombed by the Allies in 1944. Scuderia rebuilt it in 1946 and began development of the 125 S — the first vehicle to bear the Ferrari name.

Developed over two years from a clean sheet of paper, the 125 S had a unique design and received a naturally aspirated V-12 engine. Ferrari built only two cars. Chassis 01C, also known as the Piacenza roadster, had a conventional sports car body and it was used in various races throughout 1947. The second model, chassis 02C, featured cycle fenders and different bodywork. The 01C is arguably the more famous model of the two.

The 125 S was short-lived, but had an intense life. Although it was only used during Ferrari’s first year in business, chassis 01C took part in 13 races, while chassis 02C was fielded in six events. Both chassis were later fitted with larger engines and updated bodywork. In 2006, the 01C was restored with a Piacenza roadster body by Ferrari’s own Classiche program and displayed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1947 Ferrari 125 S.

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2016 Ferrari 488 GTE

2016 Ferrari 488 GTE

With more than 250 outright and class wins since its introduction in 2011, the Ferrari 458 is arguably Maranello’s most successful race car to date. Although still competitive as of 2015, the 458 will be replaced starting next year by track-prepped versions of the 488 GTB. These were revealed at the Ferrari Challenge Finali Mondiali (World Finals) in Mugello, Italy, as the 488 GTE and 488 GT3.

Like its predecessor, the 488 GTE will compete in the FIA World Endurance Championship, European Le Mans Series, and the Tudor United SportsCar Championship. There’s no word as to what teams will be using the Ferrari in North America, but Risi Competizione is likely the only factory-backed team to field 488 GTEs in 2016.

Maranello confirmed that the 488-based race car will make its official debut at the 24 Hours of Daytona in January. Both the GTE and GT3 cars will be built for four years. Michelotto, which builds the chassis for both vehicles, hopes to sell at least 150 units until 2019.

"This car’s not easy task is to open a new cycle, after the extraordinary one of the 458 Italia, one of the winningest cars in Ferrari’s history. We worked hard on it and continue to do so, because our objective is to have a high performance car that is also easy to drive, as the 458 Italia was,” said Antonello Coletta, Ferrari’s Manager of GT Sport Activities.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Ferrari 488 GTE.

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2016 Ferrari 488 GT3

2016 Ferrari 488 GT3

This past weekend, Ferrari hosted the 2015 Finali Mondiali event at Italy’s Mugello Circuit. During the event, Giancarlo Fisichella, Oliver Beretta, and Andrea Bertolini unveiled the Ferrari 488 GT3 – the next Ferrari to compete in domestic and international GT championships. The Ferrari 488 GTE was also unveiled and will go on to race in the World Endurance Championship next year. Both cars will replace the current cars, which are based on the Ferrari 458, at the start of the 2016 motorsport season.

Fisichella, Berretta, and Bertolini were responsible for a majority the new GT3’s on-track testing, but they failed to give any real details of the car at its unveiling. Ferrari has also been quiet as far as specifications and performance numbers, so at this point, official specs are a bit of a mystery. What we do know is that the car will obviously stick to GT3 regulations, which means there will be a drop in horsepower from the road-going 488.

With that being said, let’s take a look at what we do know about the new 488 GT3, and what else it might bring to the table.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 GT3.

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2017 Ferrari 488 GT3

2017 Ferrari 488 GT3

Although it’s been around for only six years (2009 to 2015), the 2010 Ferrari 458 Italia is already an iconic supercar. The 2012 Ferrari 458 Spider, the 2014 Ferrari 458 Speciale, and several one-off versions helped increase its appeal, but so did the various race-spec variants it received during its life, including the 2011 Ferrari 458 Challenge, 2013 Ferrari 458 GT3, and the 2011 Ferrari 458 Italia GT2. These race cars followed in the footsteps of their predecessors, which were based on the 1989 Ferrari 348TB, 1995-1999 Ferrari F355, 1999-2004 Ferrari 360, and 2006 Ferrari F430, and it seems the 458 GT3 will get a successor based on the 458 Italia’s replacement, the 2016 Ferrari 488 GTB.

That’s the word from TopGear, which claims, quoting an unnamed Ferrari spokesman, that the race car should arrive in early 2017. Apparently the 488 will follow Ferrari’s normal development cycle, with the Challenge version to arrive about a year after the standard model, which means we should see it in the metal by the end of next year. Since both the Challenge and the GT3 are developed together, the track-only version shouldn’t be too far behind, making a 2017 launch more than plausible.

Much like the 458 GT3, the 488 GT3 will be eligible for competitions such as the FIA World Endurance Championship, GT3 Asia, Blancpain, and British GT Championship, including the iconic 24 Hours of Le Mans race. But until the actual car breaks cover about two years from now, let’s speculate over what it may bring to the table.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1989 Ferrari F40 LM Barchetta

1989 Ferrari F40 LM Barchetta

A video that surfaced the Interwebz in April 2015, showing the Ferrari F40 LM Barchetta on TT Circuit Assen, the Netherlands, reminded me how classic cars can become stunning one-offs at the hands of their eccentric owners. The story of this car goes way back to 1993, when former racing driver Jean Blaton purchased a factory-built F40 LM that was previously raced in the North American IMSA GT Series, but not a lot is known about it nowadays. The car is not even regarded as a real Ferrari, mostly because Maranello was unhappy about what Blaton did to it, but that doesn’t make it less impressive than its factory siblings. And I aim to prove just that in the full review below.

Should Ferrari had recognized the Barchetta as a true-blue F40, it would’ve been the fourth official iteration of the nameplate, following the road car, the LM, of which only two were built for IMSA racing, and the F40 Competizione, also made for track use. All these cars were produced between 1987 and 1992, when Ferrari assembled 1,311 units at its factory in Maranello.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F40 LM Barchetta.

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2015 Ferrari SF15-T

2015 Ferrari SF15-T

Following a disappointing 2014 Formula One season, at the end of which it had to settle for a fourth-place finish in the constructor’s standing, Scuderia Ferrari seeks to score better results in 2015 with a revised version of the F14-T race car. Dubbed SF15-T and described as a "large step forward" compared to its predecessor, the new single-seater allowed Ferrari to apply all the lessons learned in
2014. To make a long story short, the SF15-T boasts a new nose, a more tightly packaged rear end, overhauled suspension kinematics, and optimized brakes.

Besides having a revised car at its disposal, as it is common with every new F1 season, Scuderia Ferrari tackles the 2015 stage with a brand-new leading driver as well. At the end of 2014, the Italians hired four-time World Champion Sebastian Vettel to replace Fernando Alonso. The German joined Ferrari after spending six seasons with Red Bull Racing, and will compete alongside Kimi Raikkonen, who returned to the Scuderia in 2014. It remains to be seen if Ferrari has what it takes to challenge

Mercedes

AMG for the World Championship, but until the season commences, let’s have a closer look at the new SF15-T racer.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Ferrari SF15-T.

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1966 - 1967 Ferrari 275 Gran Turismo Berlinetta Competizione Scaglietti

1966 - 1967 Ferrari 275 Gran Turismo Berlinetta Competizione Scaglietti

It’s hard to fill a pair of shoes owned by the Ferrari 250, arguably the most iconic Ferrari in history. The Ferrari 275 was given that task, and for the most part, it had the kind of success as a road car and a race car that the 250 would be proud of. Produced from 1964 to 1968, the 275 GTB was the first iteration to be released. It was also the first Ferrari to feature a four wheel independent suspension and a five-speed transaxle that helped the car improve its weight distribution.

Italian design house Pininfarina is largely credited as the design driving force behind the Ferrari 275, even though rival Scaglietti is credited as the hands behind the construction of the legendary grand tourer. The 275 also benefited from a 3.3-liter V-12 engine that produced between 280 to 300 horsepower. While the engine went through numerous updates during its time, the 275 pretty much relied on this one block during its life.

The 275 also had different iterations, including the aforementioned 275 GTB, as well as the GTB/C, the GTS, and later on, the Scaglietti-penned GTB/4 that became the first Ferrari to be offered without wire wheels. The GTB/4 was also different because its 3.3-liter V-12 engine came with a four-cam engine instead of the two-cam configuration of its predecessors, hence the “4” identifier on the car’s name.

Separately, a Ferrari 275 GTB/4 NART Spyder was also produced, albeit in vastly limited quantities and exclusively to American dealer Luigi Chinetti. Only 10 units of the 275 GTB/4 NART were built and its limited number made this particular model one of the most valuable Ferraris in history.

In fact, a 275 GTB/4 NART (chassis #10709) was sold for $27.5 million at the RM Auctions in Monterey on August 2013, making it one of the most expensive production cars ever sold.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 Gran Turismo Berlinetta Competizione Scaglietti.

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2015 Ferrari FXX K

2015 Ferrari FXX K

The spiritual successor to the bonkers Enzo FXX

Enzo Ferrari had always been reluctant to build and sell road cars, but he had to do so in order to fund Scuderia Ferrari, the company’s main arm since its historical foundation in 1929. As the brand moved away from sports car racing in 1973 — continuing as a Formula One team only — Ferrari became more of a road-legal sports car builder rather than a race car manufacturer. However, Maranello did not forget about its racing roots completely and it launched a special XX program that included a host of road-legal supercars turned to track-only machines. It debuted with the F40 LM in the late 1980s and continued with the Enzo-based FXX in 2005. The program continued with the 599XX in 2009, but remained dormant since then. The unveiling of the 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari sparked rumors that a new track-ready supercar was underway and it all became reality when the FXX K was unveiled at the 2014 Finali Mondiali.

The latest vehicle in a line of track-prepped, limited-edition supercars is based on the LaFerrari and is the first to carry a hybrid drivetrain. Not only more powerful than its street-legal sibling, the FXX K is also more aerodynamic, lighter and quicker. It’s also a lot more exclusive, with only a few carefully selected customers having the privilege of ordering one. The FXX K also comes with its very own racing program, as well as an exclusive racing series on Formula One tracks around the world. The FXX K is finally official and we have just enough info to understand why this extreme LaFerrari is one of the most exquisite race cars ever built. Check it out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari FXX K.

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1998 Ferrari 333 SP

1998 Ferrari 333 SP

Known as the most successful manufacturer ever to race in Formula One, Ferrari is also famous for its glorious sports car racing years. The Italians gathered no less than nine outright Le Mans wins and 13 World Sportscar Championships between the late 1940 and the early 1970s, being surpassed by very few companies in that department. Ferrari’s golden age of endurance racing came to a halt in 1974, when Enzo stopped all development of sports cars prototypes in order to focus on Formula One. Maranello lied dormant for nearly two decades until 1994, when the 333 SP, built at the request of amateur racer Giampiero Moretti, hit the track marking the brand’s return to sports prototype racing. Designed by famed Italian chassis manufacturer Dallara, the 333 SP was offered to privateers who raced it with great success until 2003. The open-top race car not only managed to give Ferrari a triumphant return to sports car racing, it also became the only Ferrari to win the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 12 Hours of Sebring.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 333 SP

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2014 Ferrari F14 T

2014 Ferrari F14 T

With the initial preseason testing underway in Jerez, Spain, Ferrari has joined the list of teams who have revealed their cars for the 2014 season of the FIA Formula 1 World Championship,

Named the F14 T after an online poll by Ferrari. Though its new 1.6-liter, V-6 engine is less powerful than last year’s V-8 engine, when combined with the ERS system, this drivetrain will actually produce more peak power than last year’s car. The F14 T features a significantly upgraded design especially up front, as we reported previously.

The F14 T will be driven by Fernando Alonso and Kimi Raikkonen, which is one of the best driver lineups by any team this year, in our opinion. With Ferrari promising it’s drivers a new LaFerrari if they manage to win the World Championship title, we don’t think we’ll have to worry about not seeing the Ferrari drivers doing all they can to challenge Adrian Newey and his boffins at Red Bull Racing.

Click past the jump to read more about the F14 T.

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2013 Ferrari 458 Competition by Racing One

2013 Ferrari 458 Competition by Racing One

With 570 horses under its hood, the Ferrari 458 Italia is ready to tackle just about any racetrack in the world. But, why not make it even more racetrack-ready with some updates specially developed for the track, just like the ones announced today by Racing One.

Racing One started off by tinkering around under the hood, where it tricked out the 4.5 liter, V-8 engine to deliver a total of 620 horsepower — a nice bump over the stock 562 ponies. The updated engine combines with variable traction control and a seven-speed racing gearbox with Getrag rocker switch that ensures the a stunning driving experience. The best part is that the new 458 Competition has a total weight of just 2,689 pounds, which is an unbelievable 1,246-pound drop from the stock model.

The new Ferrari 458 Competition is ready to take on any race in VLN or DMV competitions, or on a track day just for fun.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 458 Competition by Racing One.

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2014 Ferrari 458 Challenge Evoluzione

2014 Ferrari 458 Challenge Evoluzione

The first teaser image hit the Internet yesterday and now Ferrari has revealed the new 458 Challenge Evoluzione racecar, which made its world debut at the Mugello Circuit just one day after the Ferrari Challenge Finali Mondiali. The supercar builder will use the new model starting next year in the Ferrari one-make series, and it will hit the market in the upcoming weeks.

The 458 Challenge Evoluzione racer underwent its first public test on a windy and rainy day at the Tuscan raceway, which soiled some of the fun. Despite the rain spoiling the fun, these conditions helped prove that it is all to take on the competition on the tarmac.

For the 2014 model year, the 458 Challenge Evoluzione features an improved aerodynamic kit that includes a new rear wing for increased downforce, and up front it gets a new splitter and an updated floor. These changes improved its lap times and long-distance efficiency, making it a real threat to all comers. According to Ferrari, these changes will be mandatory on cars taking part in next year’s Challenge.

Ferrari has yet to release what’s going on under the new 458 racer’s skin, but we assume that it will carry the same 4.5-liter, V-8 engine that puts down 562 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque. We do expect to see some lightening modifications to make it accelerate and handle better than the stock 458 Italia.

Click past the jump to read more about the standard Ferrari 458 Italia.

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2015 Ferrari F12XX - TopSpeed Rendering

2015 Ferrari F12XX - TopSpeed Rendering

The Ferrari F12berlinetta and its predecessor, the 599, are some of the baddest front-engine, V-12 supercars in the world. Poke each with a sharp stick, and they will easily hit 60 mph in less than 3.5 seconds, and deliver lap times ahead of anything else with the engine out front.

But the Ferrari pricing and positioning strategy seems backwards to some outsiders. The 458 is the entry-level car, then the FF wagon, then the F12 and ultimately, the million-dollar LaFerrari.

As the flagship production car line, the F12 is absolutely one of the best cars ever made. Period. Its high-dollar clients like it so much that the previous 599XX program of special, owners-only racing events has become a major profit center for the Prancing Horse.

A bit like renting a car for about $50,000 a day for a few days a year, the Corsa Clienti and XX evolution programs have some rich history with Ferrari. Worth recalling that the 288 GTO Evoluzione both directly spawned the F40 and a whole generation of turbocharged sports cars from Japan.

So to really get buyers to open the checkbook wider than ever, the F12XX program must whet their appetite for the front-engine exotic, but also leave them wanting even more. A buyer of one car suddenly owns two red stallions. It does not take an accountant to know how lucrative this double-down selling strategy is.

Of course, spending time on Yas Marina circuit or Imola with hundreds of racing-overalls-wearing Ferrari engineers does bring a bit more street cred when wearing a red baseball hat back home in the standard F12.

So what do these double-rich buyers want from the XX program of the latest F12 supercar? Will it be a lightness and stripped-out racing program, a test-bed for new tires and manettino settings?

Or just a fun way to set the brakes on fire while keeping the wide-eyed racing stare of F1 heroes?

This exclusive TopSpeed rendering shows a speculative preview of the next Ferrari F12, which we have dubbed the F12berlinetta XX - or just F12XX for short.

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