view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

Ferrari revives our inner detective with latest update of its GT3 racer

You may not know it upon first glance, but this is the new-for-2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 Evo. Yes, Ferrari decided against building a GT3-spec F8 Tributo, and instead, Michelotto was tasked with updating the 488 GT3.Over 18,000 hours of calculations and CFD simulations went into it, and it now has a longer wheelbase following in the footsteps of the GTE car. Power stays at about 500-550 horsepower as per GT3 regulations, but the car will now be faster in the corners and more stable. Ferrari was also thoughtful enough to include an ’Endurance’ package that works hand in hand with the new ECU, supposedly making the car more reliable and smoother.

Look across Ferrari’s fence and into Mercedes-AMG’s yard, and you’ll see the comprehensively updated AMG GT-based GT3 car. You can’t miss that humongous, viperfish-like grille in the front in much the same way you can’t overlook the overhauled Porsche 911 GT3.R. That one, while still an offspring of the 991 generation, is a different beast from the original unveiled in 2015. But Ferrari isn’t one to bankroll a new racing car that easily. So, Ferrari Corse Clienti customers will have to make do with this. It should be good since Russian squad SMP Racing almost won the European Blancpain Endurance Cup this year with the old car, but just how well will it measure up against its competition?

Read more
1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

The shark-nosed sports prototype from Maranello

The Drake, a man who honed his craft as the team boss of Alfa Corse in the ’30s, carried some of the old adages over when he started his own automotive company. It’s no wonder, then, that he was reluctant to jump on the rear-mid engine train when it boomed two decades after the last pre-war Grand Prix but when his Prancing Horses finally rolled out with the engine aft of the driver they proved overwhelmingly good: in F1, the 156 steamrolled its way to both the Constructor’s and the Driver’s F1 title in 1961 and, in long-distance racing, the 196 SP, as a direct descendant of the 246 SP, foresaw what was to come in sports car racing.

The 196 SP is an incredibly rare and incredibly gorgeous beast. With a low-slung body and a nose very similar to that of the 156 F1 car, it carried what was good about the 246 SP, the first Ferrari mid-engined sports car that was unveiled in 1961, and improved on the formula. Under the rear deck, there was, effectively, half of a Colombo V-12, and not the Dino V-6 although the 196 SP has been referred to as the Dino 196 SP in some circles. Five were built for 1962 and this one, chassis #0806 is the only that has survived. RM/Sotheby’s tried selling it during the Monterey Car Week but failed. Still, the car is valued at anywhere between $8 million and $10 million. Keep reading to find out why this V-6-engined Ferrari is worth more than twice the price of a LaFerrari, Maranello’s V-12 hybrid wonder.

Read more
1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

1951 Ferrari 340 America Barchetta by Touring

A classic open-top Prancing Horse, ready for export

The Ferrari 340 America was the first model in the America series conceived with export in mind, used as a means to increase Ferrari’s footprint in the United States. The 340 featured a brand-new Lampredi V-12 which made its way to Formula 1, with this particular car racing at Le Mans twice in the early ’50s.

The Ferrari America series was launched at the dawn of the ’50s to appeal to American customers who wanted less rugged interior premises, bigger engines, and more performance. The first car of this lineage was the 340 America, which debuted at the 1950 Paris Motor Show in full racing trim. Granted, most Ferraris back then were as much race cars as they were road cars, but a customer could personalize his car to be more friendly on the road with softer suspension, different gearbox ratios, or new engine settings.

As this is a Ferrari from the early days of the company, it was made in very few numbers, on order from importers or customers. Barely 23 cars were completed between 1950 and 1952, with three coachbuilders taking care of the body. Carrozzeria Touring built six Barchetta and two Berlinetta bodies, Vignale crafted five Spyder bodies, five Berlinetta bodies, and one larger Convertible, while Ghia built only four fixed-head Coupes.

The car seen here is chassis #0116/A, the third 340 America built, and one of the 6 Barchettas by Touring. It ran briefly in period, its highlights being a couple of entries in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Owner Pierre-Louis Dreyfus shared the car in 1951 with well-known Grand Prix driver Louis Chiron and, in 1952, Rene Dreyfus. While the car didn’t reach the finish line on either occasion, it went on to sell for $8,430,000 during the 2016 RM Sotheby’s auction in Monaco.

Read on to understand why the 340 America commands such high prices.

Read more