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2004 - 2011 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti

2004 - 2011 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti

Bridging the gap between the 456 and the FF

In 2003, the Ferrari 456 was discontinued after 11 years in production. The grand tourer, which had been updated to 456M specs in 1998, was then replaced by the 612 Scaglietti. Designed by Ken Okuyama and Frank Stephenson, the 612 Scaglietti was bigger than the 456, and thus it was a true four-seater rather than a 2+2 GT like its predecessor. Named in honor of Sergio Scaglietti, who designed many Ferraris in the 1950s, including the 250 Testa Rossa, the 612 also pays homage to the 375 MM that company director Roberto Rossellini had commissioned for his wife, Ingrid Bergman, in 1954.

Unlike its forerunner, the 612 was an all-aluminum vehicle and the second following the 360 Modena. Developed with Alcoa, the space frame was later used in the 599 GTB. The GT also came with a redesigned engine. While the 456 used a 5.5-liter V-12, the 612 received the larger mill from the 575 Superamerica. While the "612" badge suggests a 6.0-liter engine, the displacement was actually 5.7 liters. Produced at the Carrozzeria Scaglietti plant, the 612 was taken to Maranello to have its interior and V-12 put in. A total of 3025 cars were produced until 2011 when the 612 was replaced by the FF. Ferrari also produced a series of limited-edition model, but more about that in the review below.

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1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast by Pininfarina

1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast by Pininfarina

Maranello’s flagship GT in the 1960s

One of the most iconic Ferrari nameplates, the America is also one of the longest standing badges from Maranello, being offered in various cars from 1951 through 1967. However, none of the Americas stand out as the top-of-the-line 500 Superfast model, which was built between 1964 and 1966 in only 37 units. As rare as they get, the Superfast is next to impossible to buy, but one example is going up for auction in Monterey this month.

Bearing chassis no. 8459SF, this specific car was the 33rd Superfast built and the eighth of 12 Series II models. It was also the seventh of only eight Superfasts built with right-hand drive. It was delivered in 1966 to British sportsman Jack Durlacher and was sold in 1976. Restored in 1981, it remained with the Manoukian Brothers for 15 years until 2007, when it was sold to the current owner. While not in mint condition, with minor dents and sign of use inside and out, the 500 Superfast has held up well, and it’s still fitted with the original engine. Let’s find out more about this fantastic grand tourer in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 500 Superfast Series II by Pininfarina

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2018 Ferrari 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari

2018 Ferrari 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari

You need to be a Ferrari racing driver to be able to buy it

It’s been only three months since the hardcore Ferrari 488 Pista was unveiled at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, and the Maranello-based firm has already created a special edition of the supercar. Designed to celebrate the 488’s success on the race track, it’s called the 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari and made its debut ahead of the iconic 24 Hours of Le Mans race.

Inspired by AF Corse’s no. 51 car, with which Alessandro Pier Guidi and James Calado won the 2017 FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC) Drivers’ and Manufacturers’ titles, the Pista Piloti Ferrari is available exclusively to customers involved in the company’s motorsport programs. In short, if you’re not racing a race-spec version of the 488, be it a GT3 or a GTE, you can’t buy one. That’s a bit harsh from the Italians, but let’s a have a closer look at what you’re missing if you’re not involved in this program.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari.

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2018 Ferrari SP38

2018 Ferrari SP38

Based on the 488 GTB, only one made

Introduced in 2015 as a replacement for the 458 Italia, the Ferrari 488 GTB is already an iconic supercar. It already spawned a topless, Spider version, as well as a replacement for the 458 Speciale, called the 488 Pista. Racing duties go to the 488 GTE and 488 GT3 for the most coveted classes in the FIA-governed championships. Much like its predecessor, it was also used for a custom limited-edition model, called the J50 and built in just ten units to celebrate 50 years since the Italian brand arrived in Japan. Come 2018 and Ferrari rolled off yet another bespoke model. It’s called the SP38, and only one will ever see the light of day.

Developed by company’s One-Off program, the SP38 was designed by the Ferrari Design Center on the chassis and running gear of the 488 GTB. It was unveiled at Ferrari’s Fiorano test track, where it was handed over to one of the company’s most dedicated customers. The new supercar will be on public display for the first time at the 2018 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este before it will find its way in a heated garage. Needless to say, the SP38 is the most intriguing version of the 488 GTB yet, and it will probably become a highly sought-after collectible in a few years.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari SP38.

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2018 Ferrari 488 Pista

2018 Ferrari 488 Pista

The highly anticipated successor to the 458 Speciale!

Ferrari has developed a fairly predictable pattern when it comes to releasing mid-engine V-8 models. First, we get the "regular" one, and then the lighter, faster, more powerful road-racer variant follows. In 2015, Ferrari replaced the iconic 458 Italia with the turbocharged, 488 GTB. Three years later and the successor to the 458 Speciale is here with more power, less weight, and improved aerodynamics. It’s called the 488 Pista, and it’s set to make its global debut at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show in March.

The successor to Ferrari’s much acclaimed, V-8-engined special series, which includes the 360 Challenge Stradale, 430 Scuderia, and the 458 Speciale, the 488 Pista is yet another homage to Ferrari’s outstanding heritage in motorsport. Much like its predecessors, the Pista was also developed using knowledge from the company’s involvement in the FIA World Endurance Championship, in which it has won five manufacturers’ titles. Both the race-spec 488 GTE and 488 Challenge served as inspiration for the Pista, also "donating" some of their dynamics and aerodynamic developments.

The 488 Pista is described as Ferrari’s most powerful and most advanced special series model so far. Let’s find out if it’s true in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 Pista.

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2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo

2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo

The ultimate LaFerrari!

When a high-profile carmaker such as Ferrari launches a great supercar like the LaFerrari, it’s difficult to imagine a way to significantly improve the design. But the team from Maranello has already done it twice. First, Ferrari launched the FXX-K, a track-only LaFerrari with enhanced aerodynamics. This happened back in 2015. Two years have passed, and the Prancing Horse found a way to make the FXX-K even more brutal. It’s called the FXX-K Evo, and it has more downforce than any Ferrari to date!

Launched at the 2017 Finali Mondiale of the Ferrari Challenge, the FXX-K Evo takes the familiar FXX-K to a new level in the same way that the Enzo-based FXX Evoluzione was a heavily upgraded FXX. Just like the FXX-K, the Evo is not homologated for road use, and production will be limited to only a few models. However, the Evo is also available as an upgrade to the standard FXX-K. The package includes many add-ons, starting with an aerodynamic kit built upon know-how obtained from the many racing series Ferrari competes in, including Formula One, GT3, GTE, and Challenge. It’s also lighter due to increased use of carbon-fiber and despite having a much larger rear wing. Yes, the FXX-K is a monster of a LaFerrari so keep reading my full review to find out more.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari FXX-K Evo.

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1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 “Daytona”

1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 “Daytona”

A Prancing Horse hungry for miles

These days, if its front-engine Italian grand touring that you’re after, the Ferrari 812 Superfast is the latest and greatest. While impressive in and of itself, the new 812 hails from a long line of F/R GT cars from the highly celebrated marque. In fact, we can trace its roots all the way back to this – the Ferrari Daytona. Originally dubbed the 365 GTB/4, this angular classic was popularized as the “Daytona” after Ferrari swept the podium at the 24 Hours of Daytona in 1967, and the name stuck ever since (even though Ferrari still insists on calling it the 365 GTB/4). First introduced at the 1968 Paris Auto Show, the Daytona was ushered in as a replacement for the Ferrari 275 GTB/4, and came equipped with a larger Colombo V-12 engine, independent suspension, and the right stuff for high-speed cruising.

The Daytona was offered in two distinct body styles, including the GTB/4 Berlinetta, and the much more rare GTS/4 Spider. A handful of racing versions were created as well. Production lasted until 1973 with nearly 1,300 units built in total, after which the mid-engine 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer replaced the Daytona in 1973. Now, the Daytona is a classic collectible automobile, with some examples easily eclipsing the seven-figure mark at auction. So what makes it so great? Read on to find out.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 Daytona.

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2017 Ferrari 488 Spider N-Largo by Novitec Rosso

2017 Ferrari 488 Spider N-Largo by Novitec Rosso

Convertible 488 gets a shots of aero and power from noted tuner

What’s possible within the aftermarket tuning scene? That’s a question I’ve heard from a lot of people, and while I can’t fully inform them of the specific benefits of going this route with their vehicles, I do tell them that “anything’s possible” when it comes to this world, especially if you have a vivid imagination and deep pockets. Take Novitec for example. The German tuner is famous for building programs for some of the world’s most exquisite exotics, including today’s lineup of Ferrari sports and supercars. Responsible for these kits is Novitec Rosso, and it’s just announced its latest tuning program for one of Maranello’s most recent models, the Ferrari 488 Spider.

Those who are familiar with Novitec’s N-Largo kit will know that the tuner has already unveiled a similar kit for a handful of other Ferrari supercars, including the F12 and the hardtop version of the Ferrari 488. The program’s formula is pretty simple too: drop a load of aerodynamic components, piece them all together, and then work on getting more power out of the engine. Suffice to say, that’s exactly what Novitec Rosso did to the 488 Spider, and the results are exactly what you’d expect them to be from a tuner that has about as excellent a reputation as any company of its kind in the business.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Ferrari 488 Spider N-Largo by Novitec Rosso

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2017 Ferrari 488 Spider Heartthrob

2017 Ferrari 488 Spider Heartthrob

New "Heartthrob" 488 Spider could find its way into an auction house in the coming months

Mere days after the one-off Ferrari 488 Spider “Green Jewel” fetched a whopping $1.3 million at RM Sotheby’s Leggenda e Passione sale in Fiorano, Italy, Ferrari took to the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show to present its latest anniversary showpiece. Once again, it’s based on the 488 Spider, only this time, it’s rocking a blue body, a red interior, and a different nickname: Heartthrob.

The one-off supercar officially goes by the name Ferrari 488 Spider Heartthrob and was created to pay tribute to the 1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Spider PF, one of only 14 open-top models designed and built by Pininfarina. Its place in Ferrari lore is cemented by the fact that its owner, Dominican racer and noted playboy Porfirio Rubirosa, drove it in just one international race, here it placed eighth overall and second in its class. That car sported a blue exterior and wore the number 235. Hardly a surprise then that the 488 Spider Heartthrob is wearing the same finish with the same number on its doors. It also gets a red leather interior, which is another nod to the classic Ferrari racer. Given the precedence of auctioning off these one-off 70th anniversary Ferraris, it’s highly unlikely that we’ll see the Heartthrob get a price tag. Instead, it could follow in the “Green Jewel’s” footsteps and find its way into an auction setting sooner than later. If that one-off went for $1.3 million, care to guess how much the Heartthrob will go for? Safe to say that a seven-figure estimate may be a little conservative at this point.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta #210

2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta #210

Could this be the hypercar that sells for $10 million?

The last Ferrari Laferrari Aperta is headed to the auction block this weekend. That alone should be enough to warrant headlines, but as most of you already know, the auction-bound LaFerrari Aperta is special in its own right. This unit isn’t supposed to exist in the first place. This is the 210th LaFerrari Aperta, a last-second creation by Maranello that isn’t a part of the initial lot of 209 units that the automaker planned to launch but was nonetheless built as an auction piece to benefit the “Save the Children” charity.

The auction is set to take place at Ferrari’s Fiorano track and is part of RM Sotheby’s “Legend e Passione” event being held as part of the Italian automaker’s 50th anniversary. Befitting the event on September 9, Ferrari gave the LaFerrari Aperta a unique look no other model of its kind had when they all came out of production. These features firmly establish the 210th model as a legitimate one-of-a-kind LaFerrari Aperta, the kind of car that Ferrari collectors will trip over themselves to get a hold of. It’s no surprise then that neither Ferrari nor RM Sotheby’s has released an estimate for the car. Considering that the 500th LaFerrari – the precursor of the 210th LaFerrari Aperta – fetched $7 million in a similar auction setting last year, the sky really is the limit as to how much the 210th LaFerrari Aperta is going to sell for this weekend.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2015 Ferrari Sergio

2015 Ferrari Sergio

If there was ever a concept that truly embodied the long-standing partnership between Ferrari and Pininfarina, it would be the 2013 Ferrari Sergio. The concept burst onto the scene at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show as a tribute model to the late Sergio Pininfarina. Reports that the Sergio was earmarked for production first surfaced in September 2014, and a little over a month later, a new report indicated that Ferrari and Pininfarina were actually building production models of the radical concept. Now, the wait is over, as it was recently officially announced that the first Ferrari Sergio has been delivered to the SBH Royal Auto Gallery at Abu Dhabi’s Yas Marina Circuit in the United Arab Emirates.

Ferrari and Pininfarina, the two architects behind the Sergio Concept, built six production versions of the radical supercar, each coming with a price tag of $3 million. The price is admittedly way more than I can afford, but for the six individuals Ferrari invited to snatch up the limited-edition piece, spending $3 million on an ultra-exclusive supercar can be considered money well spent.

Unfortunately, all six models have already been spoken for. Based on the Ferrari 458 Spider, the roadster was "created to celebrate the spirit and core values of the historic Cambiano company in the 60th anniversary year of its collaboration with the Prancing Horse," as stated in a press release.

The car is not only striking to look at, it’s also, unsurprisingly, intended to be extremely driver oriented, as is emphasized in the press release: "An authentic open-top, it explicitly references the track, underscoring and intensifying its sense of sportiness, fun behind the wheel and the pleasure of design at its purest."

Each of the six Ferrari Sergios was carefully customized by its owner at a workshop in Maranello, where a large variety of colors, materials, and finishes were on hand to suit their personal tastes. The result, clearly, is a car that’s fast, beautiful, and absolutely unique.

Updated 08/24/2017: We added a series of images taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Click past the jump to read more.

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2018 Ferrari Portofino

2018 Ferrari Portofino

The California is dead, long live the Portofino!

Launched in 2008, the Ferrari California is the company’s only convertible grand tourer. At first powered by a naturally aspirated V-8, it received a twin-turbo unit in 2014, when it was redesigned and rebadged as the California T. Come 2017 and the drop-top was once again upgraded, this time around gaining more significant changes on the outside. The nameplate was again modified, which comes at no surprise given that the facelifts of both the F12berlinetta and FF brought new names into dealerships. The California was renamed the Portofino, and it’s now more powerful than ever.

While the California name was rather familiar and dates back to the late 1950s, the Portofino is a brand-new nameplate for the Italian firm. But much like California, it was also borrowed from a geographic area, this time around from the Italian town of Portofino. Ferrari explains that this name was selected because the city has become " internationally synonymous with elegance, sportiness and understated luxury." It may take a while to get used to seeing this name on a Ferrari, but needless to say, it’s more than appropriate for the redesigned California. Keep reading to find out why.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Portofino.

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2015 Ferrari 458 Speciale A

2015 Ferrari 458 Speciale A

Ferrari unveiled the 458 Italia in 2010, then followed that up with the more precise and track-ready 458 Speciale in 2014. As is the tradition with all modern mid-engined Ferraris, Maranello creates a great car, then a year or two later it chops the top off of it to create a roadster version. We knew it was coming, but now the convertible version of the Ferrari 458 Speciale is here, and it’s calling it the “A."

It may be a silly name, but that A stands for Aperta, the Italian word for open. This is also more than a simple roofless version of the 458 Speciale; the Speciale A features the most powerful naturally aspirated V-8 the company has ever used in a spider. Compared to the old 458 Spider, this new machine is faster and more powerful, and Ferrari was even able to keep the weight down. This new car only weighs 50 kg (110 pounds) more than its hard-top sibling.

If you want one, you need to get your order in yesterday. Ferrari is limiting this new car to just 499 units. We don’t know how many of those are slated for U.S. consumption, but rest assured it won’t be a lot. If you are undecided about taking home one of these beauties, hit that jump and read our full overview of this incredible new Italian convertible.

Updated 08/18/2017: We added a series of new images taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Continue reading to find out more about the Ferrari 458 Speciale A.

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2017 Ferrari F12tdf

2017 Ferrari F12tdf

Although the majority of Ferraris built over the last four decades have featured a mid-engine layout, there was a time when all of Maranello’s products were front-engined. Until the mid-1960s, Enzo Ferrari felt that a mid-engine Ferrari would be unsafe in the hands of customers. That changed in 1966, when Enzo, having seen the stir Lamborghini created with the 1966-1974 Lamborghini Miura, approved the V-6-powered 1967-1980 Ferrari Dino for production. Although mid-engined supercars became increasingly popular through the 1970s, Ferrari continued to build front-engined cars into the 21st century, with the current lineup including the 2013 Ferrari F12berlinetta, 2012 Ferrari FF, and 2015 Ferrari California T.

The F12berlinetta, a full-fledged grand tourer, harkens back to the 1968-1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 "Daytona" of the late 1960s, and in many way to the iconic 1964-1966 Ferrari 275 GTB and 1962-1964 Ferrari 250 GTO. Much like its predecessors, it spawned various one-off and special-edition models, including the 2014 Ferrari F12 TRS, 2015 Ferrari SP America, 2015 Ferrari F60 America, and the 2015 Carrozzeria Touring Berlinetta Lusso. Now, Ferrari injected more power into the F12berlinetta to create the F12tdf, a tribute to the legendary Tour de France automobile race, an event Maranello dominated from 1956 through 1964.

Originally rumored to wear a "Speciale" badge, the F12tdf is more than just a tribute car with added grunt. The F12berlinetta shell has been redesigned for improved downforce and weight has been reduce by means of extensive carbon-fiber and aluminum use. Additionally, the Italians used new state-of-the-art tech to make the F12tdf one of the quickest Ferraris out there. Find out more below.

Updated 08/17/2017: We added a series on new images and a video taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F12tdf.

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2021 Ferrari LaFerrari Successor

2021 Ferrari LaFerrari Successor

Say hello to Maranello’s very first all-electric monster machine

Blasphemy. That’s probably the first thought of any purist considering the creation of an all-electric Ferrari. Blasphemy and sacrilege. FCA head Sergio Marchionne would agree. In 2016, at the Geneva International Auto Show, the CEO remarked that the idea of an all-electric Ferrari was “an almost obscene concept.” Later that year, at the Paris Auto Show, Ferrari’s Chief Technical Officer, Michael Leiters, echoed Marchionne’s sentiment, albeit in slightly softer terms. “We would not follow to develop a fully electric car,” Leiters said, adding, “We are convinced that it’s right to have a hybrid car because, for us, the sound is a very crucially important characteristic of a Ferrari, and our customers want to have this.” Fair enough. Thing is, even a flat-out rejection isn’t enough to stop a possible EV Ferrari. Let me explain.

First off, the sound. The howl of internal combustion is as important to the Ferrari brand as red paint, and we get that. This is a company lives and dies by its engines. The thing is Ferrari is already testing the waters – turbocharged models have been around for decades now, and electrification is integral to the performance of the “ultimate” LaFerrari hypercar. What’s more, Sergio Marchionne has already discussed the possibility of entering Formula E. Throw in continued EV development from competitors like Porsche and McLaren, and relevancy starts to become an issue. Finally, there’s that old Enzo Ferrari quote: “Aerodynamics are for people who can’t build engines.” The point is this – never say never.

Continue reading to learn more about the all-electric Ferrari LaFerrari Successor.

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2017 Ferrari 488 GTB By Novitec Rosso

2017 Ferrari 488 GTB By Novitec Rosso

German tuner goes back to its roots to develop program for Scuderia’s "mainstream" supercar

Before Novitec began tuning Lamborghinis, Maseratis, and McLarens, it staked its name and reputation on developing programs for Ferraris. It’s done quite well for itself considering that its business has expanded to other brands, but now, the famed German tuner is going back to its roots by developing a new program for the Ferrari 488 GTB, one that comes with a new aerodynamic widebody kit and increased amount of power totalling 772 horsepower and 658 pound-feet of torque.

If the numbers sound familiar, that’s because we’ve seen something similar from Novitec before, most notably on the 488 Spider. Since the two versions of the 488 are really differentiated by the presence and/or absence of a roof, it stands to figure that the tuner would end up releasing a similar kit for the GTB variant. Well, it’s happened and Novitec even threw in a new widebody kit and additional improvements on the exhaust and suspension for good measure. The finished product is what you’d expect from a tuner like Novitec. It’s well rounded and versatile enough to attract owners of the 488 GTB and get them to spend for the opportunity to have one fitted into their supercars.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Ferrari 488 GTB N-Largo by Novitec.

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2019 Ferrari 812 Aperta

2019 Ferrari 812 Aperta

The 812 Superfast would make a great roadster!

After five years on the market, the already iconic Ferrari F12berlinetta received its mid-cycle facelift in 2017. A comprehensive update with a fully redesigned exterior, the facelifted F12 also changed its name to the 812 Superfast and gained a larger V-12 engine with more oomph. Ready to hit dealerships for the 2018 model year, the new 812 Superfast looks like a solid base for a good looking and fast convertible. But will Ferrari build it?

That’s still up for debate, as Maranello has yet to say anything about chopping the roof off the 812 Superfast. Adding to this is the fact that the F12berlinetta was a coupe only in standard production form, but Ferrari did make a few convertibles, including the one-off F12 TRS and the F60 America. So, it’s not entirely unfeasible that we’ll see an 812 Aperta in the future but, if we do, it’ll be in very limited numbers. Until that happens, we created a rendering of the car to go with the speculative review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 812 Aperta.

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