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2020 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

2020 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

There Is No Other Car In the World Like the Ferrari SF90 Stradale

Ferrari dropped the bomb. The biggest that has ever fallen on the car world scene. It is the plug-in hybrid Ferrari SF90 Stradale, a production car that is more powerful and quicker than the LaFerrari itself. Inspired by none other than the F1 car, the new Ferrari SF90 Stradale became the Ferrari-first plug-in hybrid with a propulsion technology consisting of three electric motors and an overpowered V-8. Aptly named after the Scuderia Ferrari’s 90th anniversary and, coincidentally, the 2019 Ferrari F1 car, the Ferrari SF90 Stradale is the closest to a Ferrari F1 car you can experience on public roads.

Ferrari unveiled the car at a special event where Ferrari F1 drivers Sebastien Vettel and Charles Leclerc drove two SF90 Stradale cars onto the scene.

Disclosure: this is not the Ferrari LaFerrari successor. It is a whole new car that does not follow the F40, F50, Enzo, and the LaFerrari lineage. In fact, it is far less expensive compared to any of them. Nevertheless, it is much quicker too.

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2020 Ferrari F8 Tributo

2020 Ferrari F8 Tributo

Ferrari’s replacement for the 488 GTB features the high-revving V-8 from the Pista

The 2020 Ferrari F8 Tributo is an entry-level supercar that the Maranello-based company launched in 2019. The F8 Tributo replaced the 488 GTB, introduced in 2015, but it’s essentially a mid-cycle upgrade and not a brand-new car. The supercar replaces the 488 GTB in the same way that the 812 Superfast and GTC4Lusso replaced the F12berlinetta and FF, respectively, with the facelift accompanied by a nameplate change.

The upgrade is rather significant as far as design goes. Not only sporting new features front and rear, but the F8 Tributo also boasts more aggressive aerodynamics, which are based on the track-ready 488 Pista. The F8 also shares underpinnings with the Pista and generates the same 710 horsepower. The F8 Tributo arrives just in time for the facelifted Lamborghini Huracan Evo and the relatively new McLaren 720S. Let’s find out how they compare.

Updated 03/08/2018: We update this review with a series of new images taken during the 2019 Geneva Motor Show.

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2016 Ferrari GTC4Lusso Sleigh 2.0

2016 Ferrari GTC4Lusso Sleigh 2.0

The ultimate in Christmas present delivery for the one and only

Here at TopSpeed, we’ve got a closely guarded secret, but we’ve finally decided to spill the beans. See, for the last 10 years, we’ve been on Santa’s advisory board and are tasked with helping him plan his annual trip around the world. Usually, we advise him of what new vehicles are best for transporting presents and help him plan out his trip. However, this year, he asked us to kick it up a notch and help him design an all-new sleigh that will not only give Rudolph and the rest of the gang a much-needed rest but will also get him around the world in style and luxury. It took us four months just to decided which model to start out with, but in the end, we developed the GTC4Lusso Sleigh 2.0.

Santa is more than happy with the sleigh we’ve come up with, and it’s already been through extensive testing in preparation for the big day. Based on the 2016 Ferrari GTC4Lusso, you know the big man is traveling in luxuriousness, and he can obviously get there quickly too. But, there’s a lot more than what meets the eye. See; this isn’t your everyday GTC4Lusso – this baby is loaded to the gills with the type of magic that only Santa can make possible. So, this thing carries a considerable amount of power over the standard 6.3-liter V-12 and, despite appearing small, has enough cargo room to haul enough presents to hit half of the world in one trip.

But, before I get too far ahead of myself, Santa’s already hard at work navigating his way to the homes of kids all over the world. So, let’s dive on in a take a look at the GTC4Lusso Sleigh 2.0.

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2020 Ferrari Roma

2020 Ferrari Roma

Ferrari has introduced the Roma, a car that is considered to be the most elegant and exotic Ferrari ever made. It features the latest concept of “Nuove Dolce Vita” (New Sweet Life) design that improves on a number of things, the most important of which is aerodynamics. The Roma has a traditional shark nose up front with linear LED headlights while the side profile is void of the usual side shields – a move that harkens back to the 1950s. The rear end features and active spoiler and a compact diffuser that just exudes the car’s sporty and performance-oriented nature.

The interior has an evolved version of the of the dual-cockpit concept that includes an individual cell for the driver and passenger – a design that gives the passenger the feeling of being a co-pilot. Interior materials include:

Full-grain Frau leather Alcantara Chromed aluminum Carbon fiber

Power comes from a 3.0-liter V-8 that’s good for 612 horsepower and 561 pound-feet of torque – the former of which represents a 20-horsepower increase over the car it’s based on. The Roma, in this specification, can reach 62.1 mph (100 km/h) in 3.4 seconds on the way to a top speed of 200 mph. Ferrari has yet to release pricing details, but word has it that an MSRP of at least $225,000 is expected.

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2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 EVO

Ferrari revives our inner detective with latest update of its GT3 racer

You may not know it upon first glance, but this is the new-for-2020 Ferrari 488 GT3 Evo. Yes, Ferrari decided against building a GT3-spec F8 Tributo, and instead, Michelotto was tasked with updating the 488 GT3.Over 18,000 hours of calculations and CFD simulations went into it, and it now has a longer wheelbase following in the footsteps of the GTE car. Power stays at about 500-550 horsepower as per GT3 regulations, but the car will now be faster in the corners and more stable. Ferrari was also thoughtful enough to include an ’Endurance’ package that works hand in hand with the new ECU, supposedly making the car more reliable and smoother.

Look across Ferrari’s fence and into Mercedes-AMG’s yard, and you’ll see the comprehensively updated AMG GT-based GT3 car. You can’t miss that humongous, viperfish-like grille in the front in much the same way you can’t overlook the overhauled Porsche 911 GT3.R. That one, while still an offspring of the 991 generation, is a different beast from the original unveiled in 2015. But Ferrari isn’t one to bankroll a new racing car that easily. So, Ferrari Corse Clienti customers will have to make do with this. It should be good since Russian squad SMP Racing almost won the European Blancpain Endurance Cup this year with the old car, but just how well will it measure up against its competition?

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1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

Maybe the most beautiful open-top car that money can buy

The entire Ferrari 250 line seems to have secured its place in the palace of automotive royalties for generations to come. With unmistakable lines, a variety of powerful but also reliable Colombo V-12s, and limited-run production, almost all of the late-50s to early-60s Ferrari 250 models command astronomical values at auction nowadays.

There are, of course, some stars that shine brighter than others, such as the 250 GTO, the 250 GT SWB, and, lastly, the 250 California SWB Spider built between 1960 and 1962. This is one of those short-wheelbase California Spiders but, despite its originality, it lacks the aura of the ex-Alain Delon ’barn find’ that sold for $18.5 million four years ago.

Besides the fact that Alain Delon once owned and thrashed that particular 250 California SWB Spider, what made it even more desirable were its covered headlights. Amazingly, the more sought after variant is, actually, the one Ferrari made more of: a total of 37,250 California SWB Spiders left the factory with covered headlights and just 19 were optioned without the glass over the twin circular headlamps. Read on to learn more about the strange case of a buyer-induced trend that goes against the otherwise untouchable principle of rarity.

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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

The mid-’60s Ferrari that dreams are made of

The Ferrari 275 GTB is widely considered to be one of the prettiest grand touring cars built during the sizzling ’60s. Displaying an evolutionary design language influenced by Ferrari’s glorious 250-series models such as the 250 GTO and the 250 GTE 2+2, the 275 GTB came in both short-nose and long-nose specification, with the 3.3-liter Colombo V-12 first featuring two overhead camshafts before Ferrari introduced, in 1967, the 275 GTB/4 with four overhead camshafts. This here is a Series II 275 GTB or, in other words, a long-nosed version built towards the end of the GTB’s production run in 1966. It’s one of the last of just a few dozen 275 GTBs with an all-aluminum body shell that makes the car both lighter and rust-proof. Too bad it’s as expensive as a handful of Ferrari F40s.

Even fans of modern supercars and wedge-shaped obscurities from the ’80s would oftentimes come together and agree that the GTs made in the ’60s are a sight to behold: elongated noses, low rooflines, and a tail that usually ends with a stubby Kammback. It’s a well-known recipe and few applied it better than Ferrari. Designed by the house of Pininfarina, by now an integral part of the Maranello-based manufacturer, the 275 GTB came to sweepingly replace all of the 250-series models. It was designed to be more user-friendly, more practical, but without giving up on performance or the unique feeling of being behind the wheel of a Ferrari. Included by many publications on shortlists of the prettiest Ferraris of all time, the 275 GTB was also a successful race car and it also spawned an open-top version in the N.A.R.T.-commissioned 275 GTS/4 Spyders built between 1967 and 1968 (the 275 GTS featured a completely different Pininfarina body while the N.A.R.T. cars featured Scaglietti bodies in the style of Pininfarina’s Berlinetta design).

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2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

Ferrari’s replacement for the 488 Spider is just as powerful as the track-ready 488 Pista

The Ferrari F8 Spider is the convertible version of the F8 Tributo. It replaces the outgoing Ferrari 488 Spider in the lineup and just like its coupe counterpart, it features technology and underpinnings from the track-bred 488 Pista. While not as dynamic as the 488 Pista Spider, it’s a solid improvement over the 488 Spider. The F8 Spider joins a prestigious bloodline of drop-top V-8 sports cars that begun with the iconic 308 GTS back in 1977.

Ferrari’s most powerful V-8 convertible alongside the 488 Pista Spider, the F8 Spider arrives just in time to compete with the Lamborghini Huracan Evo Spyder. It also goes against the McLaren 720S Spider, yet another fine example of the high-performance sports car market. Find out what sets apart the F8 Spider from its predecessors and how it compares with its rivals in the detailed review below.

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2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

The front-engined, V-12 convertible GT returns after 50 years

The Ferrari 812 GTS is the convertible version of the 812 Superfast, the grand tourer that replaced the F12berlinetta in 2017. Ferrari’s range-topping drop-top as of 2019, the 812 GTS is also the company’s first production, front-engined, V-12 convertible since 1969. After 20 years of limited edition grand tourers with infinite headroom, Ferrari finally caved in a build a production-ready, drop-top grand tourer.

Besides the "GTS" badge and the minor changes above the waistline, this drop-top is pretty much identical to the 812 Superfast. It has the same 6.5-liter V-12 engine under the hood and comes with almost 800 horsepower on tap. It needs less than three seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start and tops out at more than 200 mph. All told, it’s one of the most potent grand tourers on the market and a turning point for Ferrari, which just released its first full-production convertible GT in 50 years. Find out more about that in the review below.

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1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

The shark-nosed sports prototype from Maranello

The Drake, a man who honed his craft as the team boss of Alfa Corse in the ’30s, carried some of the old adages over when he started his own automotive company. It’s no wonder, then, that he was reluctant to jump on the rear-mid engine train when it boomed two decades after the last pre-war Grand Prix but when his Prancing Horses finally rolled out with the engine aft of the driver they proved overwhelmingly good: in F1, the 156 steamrolled its way to both the Constructor’s and the Driver’s F1 title in 1961 and, in long-distance racing, the 196 SP, as a direct descendant of the 246 SP, foresaw what was to come in sports car racing.

The 196 SP is an incredibly rare and incredibly gorgeous beast. With a low-slung body and a nose very similar to that of the 156 F1 car, it carried what was good about the 246 SP, the first Ferrari mid-engined sports car that was unveiled in 1961, and improved on the formula. Under the rear deck, there was, effectively, half of a Colombo V-12, and not the Dino V-6 although the 196 SP has been referred to as the Dino 196 SP in some circles. Five were built for 1962 and this one, chassis #0806 is the only that has survived. RM/Sotheby’s tried selling it during the Monterey Car Week but failed. Still, the car is valued at anywhere between $8 million and $10 million. Keep reading to find out why this V-6-engined Ferrari is worth more than twice the price of a LaFerrari, Maranello’s V-12 hybrid wonder.

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1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

A one-off coupé based on the Ferrari 375 MM race car

The 1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale is a one-off version of the iconic 375 MM bodied by Italian coach builder Ghia. The Ferrari 375 MM was built from 1953 until 1955. It was developed as a race car, but some were converted to road use. One of only nine road-going coupés built on the 375 MM chassis, the Coupé Speciale is also the only 375 design by Ghia and the last Ferrari built by the company. The car was showcased at the 1955 Torino Motor Show and was then shipped to Robert Wilke, owner of the Leader Card Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

A racing fan, Wilke, who sponsored an IndyCar team from the 1930s until his death in 1970, was also a personal friend of Enzo Ferrari. The 375 MM Coupé Speciale was one of seven unique vehicles that Ferrari built for the businessman, but it’s the most historically significant vehicle owned by him. Also one of the most documented Ferraris in existence, the Coupé Speciale changed hands several times since the 1970s. Come 2019 and it’s going under the hammer to find a new owner at RM Sotheby’s car sale in Monterey on August 15-17.

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2021 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

2021 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

The Mid-Engine Ferrari V-6 Hybrid Is A Whole New Car That Slots Below The F8 Tributo But Could Be Faster

Announced at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show, the new Ferrari V-6 hybrid is ready for introduction this summer. Expected in a mid-engine form, the Ferrari with a hybridized V-6 propulsion system will probably slot below the F8 Tributo and ride on a modular platform that will underpin at least one more Ferrari supercar in the future. Maybe the one with the V-8 hybrid system.

Chief Technical Officer Michael Leiters presented Ferrari’s product strategy back in September in 2018 and announced the new Ferrari V-6 family:

"We will develop a totally new V6 family based on a very, very particular, innovative architecture with plenty of innovations regarding technologies and components."
We spied the Ferrari V-6 hybrid in prototype form in Sweden and Germany. Our spy photographers heard V-6 sounds while some videos, filmed in Maranello before that, apparently show the Ferrari V-6 hybrid running on electric power only. Even though this may be the case for the prototype, I doubt that the Ferrari V-6 mid-engine supercar will have an only-electric drive mode. However, Ferrari marketing head, Enrico Galleria reported some time ago that the Ferrari hybrid GT cars will probably have a Plug-In Hybrid technology. The Purosangue SUV as well!

Now, we have our first look at the first Ferrari Hybrid V-6 as it was doing some cold-weather testing.

Update 5/29/2019:Ferrari has just debuted the all-new SF90 Stradale, a V-8, hybrid supercar that is already stealing a lot of thunder from the Ferrari LaFerrari. Check out our special gallery below to get your first look while we update this review!

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2019 Ferrari P80/C

2019 Ferrari P80/C

Based on the 488 GT3, it’s the most extreme 488 design to date

The Ferrari P80/C is a one-off supercar built by the company’s special projects unit. Designed by the same team that created the SP12 EPC, F12 TRS, J50, and the Monza SP1 and SP2 twins, the P80/C is based on the race-spec Ferrari 488 GT3. The supercar also draws cues from the iconic 330 P3/P4 the 1966 Dino 206S, as requested by its customer.

In development since 2015, the P80/C had the longest development time of any Ferrari one-off made to date. Ferrari says it spent almost four years on in-depth styling research and engineering development, with "meticulous analysis of performance parameters as well as scrupulous aerodynamic testing, all with a different approach than taken by Ferrari with its one-off cars in the past." Based on the way this car looks, I’m tempted to believe Ferrari isn’t just pulling PR tricks on us. Let’s have a closer look at the supercar we may never get to see in the metal anytime soon.

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2016 Ferrari GTC4Lusso Sleigh 2.0

2016 Ferrari GTC4Lusso Sleigh 2.0

The ultimate in Christmas present delivery for the one and only

Here at TopSpeed, we’ve got a closely guarded secret, but we’ve finally decided to spill the beans. See, for the last 10 years, we’ve been on Santa’s advisory board and are tasked with helping him plan his annual trip around the world. Usually, we advise him of what new vehicles are best for transporting presents and help him plan out his trip. However, this year, he asked us to kick it up a notch and help him design an all-new sleigh that will not only give Rudolph and the rest of the gang a much-needed rest but will also get him around the world in style and luxury. It took us four months just to decided which model to start out with, but in the end, we developed the GTC4Lusso Sleigh 2.0.

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2018 Ferrari SP3JC

2018 Ferrari SP3JC

Maranello’s latest-one creation was ordered by a former freelance writer

Following a long line of one-off creations, Ferrari has built another one-make masterpiece, called the SP3JC. Based on the Ferrari F12tdf, the SP3JC is effectively the F12 Spider we never had. It has no roof (obviously), and it wears a funky tri-color paint scheme that really doesn’t do justice to the exclusivity of this model. Scottish collector John Collins owns this model after commissioning Ferrari to build it more than three years ago. The wait was long, but the final product made it worth it.

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1995 Ferrari F512 M

1995 Ferrari F512 M

The final hurrah of the Ferrari Testarossa

The Ferrari F512 M was the last evolution of the Testarossa, unarguably one of the legendary cars of the ‘80s. The F512 M was lighter than its predecessor, featured more modern styling, and boasted improved handling characteristics.

Everyone knows the Testarossa. With its red cam covers, its long “cheese graters” on the sides, and angular design, it’s a staple of its time and one of Ferrari’s modern icons. At the time, it was every bit as fast as a Countach, if not slightly faster. It handled slightly better and, more importantly, was a more relaxed tourer in that you could actually drive the Testarossa for 500 miles at a time and not drop dead from back pain afterward.

The F512 TR continued the trend and refined the recipe, but the ultimate expression of this body shape came in 1994 and was christened F512 M, where M stands for “Modificato.” Indeed, there were many modifications done to the F512 M even in comparison to the F512 TR, but the same spirit was still there. It was to be the rarest of all the Testarossas since only 501 were built through 1996 when Ferrari rolled out the front-engined grand tourer called 550 Maranello.

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