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1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS

1964 - 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS

In terms of desirability, not much on four wheels can top the Ferrari 250 GT California Spider SWB. So when it came time forFerrari to build a follow up, it had its work cut out for it. The car that resulted was the 275 GTS, a convertible for the American market, despite the word “California” being left out of the name. And in pretty typical Ferrari fashion for the day, the GTS is a different vehicle from anything else with a 275 name, with differences going beyond the fact that the roof comes down.

The 275 GTS is based on the 275 GTB, which is about as close to standard as Ferrari nomenclature gets. But not only do the cars appear to be completely different models, they were built for different purposes. The GTB is a sports car, and so was the 275 GTB/4 that followed it, but the GTS was treated more as a grand tourer. And like a strangely large number of Ferrari convertibles from the era, it was also treated almost as more of a limited production special edition than a full-on production model. Odd when you consider how popular roofless Ferraris would turn out to be later.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 275 GTS.

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider

The record-shattering $27 million dollar auction price of the ultra-rare 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider is making waves through the entire classic car scene.

Never before has such a late-model Ferrari earned such totals - which are typically the preserve of the 250 series from pre-1964.

What makes this gorgeous Ferrari so much more valuable than the thousands of other classic Ferrari’s seeking new homes? How did the price of this single model nearly double the $14 million dollar average price - excluding this giant total - when any of these 10 cherished models have changed hands in the past?

Part of what makes this NART Spider so valuable is the car’s unique blend of the gorgeous late-1950s Ferrari styling and advanced mechancials. The GTB/4S upgrades dramatically increased the performance and handling of this V-12 supercar. Almost the entire Maranello racing technology suite was applied to the NART Spider - allowing it to be a posh cruiser that was also capable of serious speed on a racetrack.

The V-12’s quad overhead camshafts were a first on a road car, while the rear-mounted transaxle, limited-slip diff and independent rear suspension were all huge advancements that were offered first in the NART Spider.

Ferrari never looked back from all the new technology introduced on the NART Spider. At the same time, the NART is especially sentimental because Ferrari would not make make such an emotionally-styled road car again for decades. The 365 GTB/4 Daytona was 1967’s new hot style and Ferrari followed the money trail by ending 275 production.

Little did they know, the layers of exclusivity and special editions that helped create this this NART Spider would make it the most valuable road car ever sold. Ever.

Click past the jump for the full review of this timeless classic Ferrari, with details on the technology and style of this model during its 10-unit production run in 1967.

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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider's $27 Million Price Breaks Ferrari's Record

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider’s $27 Million Price Breaks Ferrari’s Record

To go along with the 2013 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance were a few auctions that typically have 10 to 12 million-dollar cars on hand each and every year. This year was no exception, as RM Auction’s Monterey auction had a total of 15 million dollar hammer values, but that’s not the most imressive number of the weekend.

The most impressive of the million-dollar club this year was the price tag that the 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S N.A.R.T Spider. This 1-of-10 model went for an astounding $27.5 million once the hammer fell on it, making it the second-most valuable car ever sold at auction and the most valuable Ferrari ever sold at auction by a long shot.

Reports point toward the car heading to the waiting arms of Canadian fashion businessman Lawrence Stroll, but those reports are not confirmed. Either way, whoever landed this Ferrari certainly has one of the most rarest cars on the planet and a much lighter wallet. Plus he gets to tinker around in a classic supercar with an incredible-for-the-era 3,286 cc quad-overhead-cam V-12 powerplant that blasts out 300 horsepower.

Alongside this outrageous auction price, there was also a 1928 Mercedes-Benz 680S Torpedo Roadster that went for $8.25 million; a 1954 Ferrari500 Mondial Spider Series I that went for $3.52 million; and a 1974 McLaren M16C Indianapolis that went for the same $3.52 million.

Click past the jump to see the full million-dollar sales from this past Saturday.

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Hennessey Preparing to Update the Ferrari 458 Spider

Hennessey Preparing to Update the Ferrari 458 Spider

Usually, Hennessey shows interests in American sports cars, but now the tuner is preparing to update the look and the output level of the Ferrari 458 Italia Spider. All the tuner currently announced for the Italian roadster is an HPE800 tuning kit that we know will deliver up to 800 horsepower, but you shouldn’t be very surprised to see an HPE1000 package – a 1,000-horsepower variant – announced for the 458 Spider.

A similar kit was announced for the McLaren MP4-12C and it included an upgraded intercooler system, air-intake system, and ball-bearing turbochargers, as well as ECU updates and, of course, a new Hennessey titanium exhaust system. So, we can expect a similar offering for the 458 Italia.

Of course, a series of exterior updates will also be offered, and they include a new hood with larger intercoolers, new front and rear bumpers and a new set of wheels. For the interior, we will see numerous carbon-fiber, Alcantara and leather updates.

Full details will be unveiled in the near future, so stay tuned!

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2013 Ferrari 458 Spider by Capristo

2013 Ferrari 458 Spider by Capristo

The Ferrari 458 Italia Spider had a pretty big 2012 and 2013 is starting out pretty quickly for the entry –level Ferrari, as Capristo has unveiled its first tuning kit of the year for said model. The tuner is quite famous here at TopSpeed and only last year we saw a sweet tuning kit offered for the Lamborghini Aventador.

As usual, changes the tuner is offering are not overwhelming, but they do add to the overall character of the 458 Italia. From factory, the 458 Italia comes with an aluminum roof to help keep its curb weight to a minimum and Capristo has additionally lowered the car’s weight by replacing the stock hood with a new one made in carbon-fiber unit that features lengthwise inlaid glass and additional vents for better engine cooling.

The price for this update is pretty high, and if you are interested you will have to pay about €9800 (about $12,850 at the current exchange rates). For the money, you will also get the hood painted in the color you desire.

Not too overly exciting, but a cool addition for an owner looking to save a few pounds.

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2013 Ferrari 458 Italia Spider by Kahn Design

2013 Ferrari 458 Italia Spider by Kahn Design

British tuner Kahn Design produces so many programs for a wide variety of vehicles that it’s safe to ask whether or not they know the concept of a ’holiday.’ Be that as it may, give these guys credit for always working out new ways to bring aftermarket goodies to auto enthusiasts.

For their latest piece of work, Kahn Design took the Ferrari 458 Italia Spider to give it its usual round-up of modifications. While no distinct modifications are noticeable from these pictures, the British tuner did say that their program will come with a variety of new components for the Italian supercar, including "front and rear sections, ceramic brakes, wing shields, upgraded F1 gearbox and yellow brake calipers." On top of that, the program also gets the usual custom bespoke interior, as well as a new set of 21" (front) and 22" (rear) wheels Monza forged wheels.

From the looks of things, the program might still be in its current development stages. But rest assured, if there’s one tuner that rarely disappoints, it’s Kahn Design. We’re confident that these guys have more up their sleeves for the beastly drop-top 458 Italia.

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1957 Ferrari 500 TRC by Scaglietti

1957 Ferrari 500 TRC by Scaglietti

Another member of the four Ferraris heading to auction as a part of the late Sherman Wolf’s estate is a 1957 500 TRC by Scaglietti. The TRC is often recognized as one of the most beautiful Ferraris ever manufactured, much of which is accredited to Sergio Scaglietti’s work on this body. Only 19,500 TRCs were ever built and this particular model was initially sold to John von Neumann, then went to Dr. Frank Becker, then to Thor Thorson, and finally to Mr. Wolf about 20 years ago.

This car’s body looks to be in superb shape and is draped in a bright red, but there is no mention of it having ever been restored. Helping increase this 500 TRC’s value is that this model has 100 percent matching numbers.

Under the hood is a 2,498 cc (2.5-liter) 4-cylinder engine with twin ignition. This engine pumps out a healthy 220 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 190 pound-feet of torque at 5,400 rpm. It hits these high power numbers without the aid of any forced induction, which is rather amazing. The engine links up to a 4-speed manual transmission that serves up this power to a 3.78-to-1 rear axle.

Though it was considered a racecar, this 500 TRC boasts old-style 4-wheel drum brakes along with 5.25-inch spoked wheels on the front and 6-inch spoked wheels on the rear. The front suspension is an independent design with dual wishbones and coil springs. The rear suspension boasts a live axle with trailing arms and coil springs.

Gooding & Company anticipates this 1957 500 TRC by Scaglietti to fetch between $4.5 and $6.5 million.

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

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2012 Ferrari 458 Italia Spyder Monaco by Mansory

2012 Ferrari 458 Italia Spyder Monaco by Mansory

The Top Marques Monaco is without question one of the most important dates on the tuning calendar, particularly because of the location it’s held at every year. Nothing speaks more to millionaires throwing their money around than Monte Carlo, and some of the best tuners use that platform to show off their latest programs.

Now that the 2012 Top Marques Monaco has come and gone, we can definitely say that the tuners in attendance gave us programs that were for the books. One in particular was Mansory, which only recently wowed us at Geneva with not one, not two, not three, but four programs for some of the finest exotics in the land.

For their Monaco offering, the Swiss tuner brought their very first program for the Ferrari 458 Italia Spyder, appropriately called "Monaco."

As you can expect, Mansory did some serious bodywork upgrades on the 458 Italia Spyder, complete with a body kit that’s made out of carbon fiber. The kit includes a restyled front apron with air inlets for the front coolers, a new bonnet, side skirts with integrated ducts, a rear skirt with an integrated diffuser, carbon blades that replace the rear window, and a rear wing. All told, the carbon fiber components shaved of 60 kg (132 lbs) from the supercar’s overall weight.

Under the hood of the Italian stallion, Mansory reprogrammed the ECU, the sports air filter, and the sport exhaust, translating to an increased output of 590 horsepower and 413 lb/ft of torque with a 0-62 mph time of 3.2 seconds and a top speed of 205 mph.

UPDATE 07/10/2012: Youtube user, Marchettino, was able to film the Mansory 458 Italia Monaco at an undisclosed auto show in France, providing a more in-depth look at the modified supercar. Check it out after the jump!

Check out videos of the Ferrari 458 Italia Spyder Monaco by Mansory after the jump!

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1966 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars

1966 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars

While most of us are still waiting for Ferrari to bring back the legendary Dino name, the classic version is still breaking hearts. One of the only 18 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyders to be produced has been auctioned by RM Auctions in Monaco for an amazing €2,520,000, or about $3,155,000 at the current exchange rates.

The Ferrari Dino 206 S was unveiled in February 1966 and was aimed to race the FIA’s 2-liter Group 4 class against the most powerful of Porsche models. The Dino was up for the task using a 65 degree V-6 engine that had been conceived by Dino Ferrari himself.

Shortly after its debut, the Dino 206 S proved what an amazing car it really was: it earned a 2nd place finish at the Targo Florio, 2nd and 3rd at the Nurburgring, and a 6th place finish at Spa. Then, in June 1967 with Richard Attwood and David Piper behind the wheel, it scored another impressive result, this time in the 1,000 Kilometer Nurburgring race: 6th place overall and 1st in class.

Hit the jump to read more about the Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars.

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1953 Ferrari 375 MM Spider by Pininfarina

1953 Ferrari 375 MM Spider by Pininfarina

In the 1950s, car racing was nowhere near what it has become today. The majority of the cars on road circuits were more about how good the driver was and how well the car was tuned. This meant that the majority of the cars were lightweight and only had between 200 and 250 horsepower. Having said that, there always has to be some sort of exception and the exception here is the 1953 Ferrari 375 MM Spider and RM Auctions has one set to go to auction on May 12th, 2012.

The Ferrari 375 MM Spider managed to completely dominate the World Sports Car Championship between 1954 and 1957, winning a total of 11 races and having seven more podium appearances (top 3 or 4 places). It also won two national championships in Argentina in 1954 and 1955.

In 1957, the car was retired following a crash. Post-retirement someone managed to get a hold of this storied racer, pulled out the Italian V-12 and dropped in a U.S.-built V-8 engine, which really seems pointless to us. After the V-8 muscle went into it, this once famed roadster just disappeared from automotive history.

In 1983, this American-powered Ferrari resurfaced and made its way back to home. In Italy, Count Zanon di Valsiurata repaired the image of this car by reinstalling its Italian power plant and restoring it to an acceptable condition.

How does this one-time powerhouse of the WSC and 1 of 15 Pininfarina examples ever built stand up to 2012 standards?

Click past the jump to find out.

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2012 Ferrari 458 Spider by Novitec Rosso

2012 Ferrari 458 Spider by Novitec Rosso

The Ferrari 458 Italia has already received two upgrade programs from Novitec Rosso: a "standard" one and a second one called "Twins." And now the tuner is turning their attention to the 458 Spyder. Just like with the coupe version, the roadster has also received a carbon aero kit, superlight forged wheels, an engine increase to 609 HP and a top speed of 201 mph.

The standard 458 Spyder delivers a total of 570 HP, but Novitec Rosso has added a special carbon-fiber air box with modified air routing and a high-performance exhaust system. As a result the car delivers a total of 609 HP at 9,100 rpm and a peak torque of 419 lbs-ft at 5,400 rpm.

For the exterior the tuner is offering a new front fascia upgraded with a two-piece front spoiler and side flaps, new sill skirts and a new rear spoiler lip or a rear wing. All these elements are made in carbon fiber. The car sits on a new set of 22" forged wheels combined with a hydraulic suspension system that can raise the car’s ride by 40 mm or lower it by 35 mm.

Hit the jump to read more about the new Ferrari 458 Spider by Novitec Rosso.

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1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino Replica: Real Enough for My Dollar

1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino Replica: Real Enough for My Dollar

The 1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino is one of the rarest cars in the world, as Ferrari only built a total of 18 of these sweet machines. Well, the rarer the car, the more likely enthusiasts are to start replicating them, so seeing a replica of this famous car is to be expected. However, a high-quality replica is much less common.

A recent beauty popped up on eBay and it is likely one of the best recreations of a classic Ferrari we have ever seen. This replica 1966 Ferrari 206 SP Dino is about as close to 100% perfect as you can get. It has a custom-built alloy body with a 1,987 cc V-6 engine from a Ferrari Dino 206 GT. It may not crank out the 215 horsepower that the 206 SP’s 1,999 cc engine cranked, but the Dino 206 GT’s engine was rated at a respectable 176 horsepower (1967 model year). Driving this mid-mounted engine’s power to the rear wheels is a magnesium gearbox, which is likely a five-speed configuration.

Being the party poopers that we are, we had to examine this replica closely and see what differences we could find between it and the original. The first thing that stands out is the parked positioning of the wiper blade. The replica’s wiper blade is parked on the driver’s side of the vehicle. On the original, the wiper blade parks almost in the middle of the windshield.

The second thing is that the cutout in front of the windshield is several inches too close to the windshield. The original 206 SP Dino’s cutout is at least 8 inches from the windshield and the replica’s cutout is about 3 inches from the windshield.

Lastly, the driver’s side window frame on the original is unpainted, whereas the replica’s is painted red. All of that said, for a starting bid of “only” $89,100, this is not a bad deal, given an original 206 SP Dino fetched $3,267,000 at an auction in 2007.

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