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2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

The front-engined, V-12 convertible GT returns after 50 years

The Ferrari 812 GTS is the convertible version of the 812 Superfast, the grand tourer that replaced the F12berlinetta in 2017. Ferrari’s range-topping drop-top as of 2019, the 812 GTS is also the company’s first production, front-engined, V-12 convertible since 1969. After 20 years of limited edition grand tourers with infinite headroom, Ferrari finally caved in a build a production-ready, drop-top grand tourer.

Besides the "GTS" badge and the minor changes above the waistline, this drop-top is pretty much identical to the 812 Superfast. It has the same 6.5-liter V-12 engine under the hood and comes with almost 800 horsepower on tap. It needs less than three seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start and tops out at more than 200 mph. All told, it’s one of the most potent grand tourers on the market and a turning point for Ferrari, which just released its first full-production convertible GT in 50 years. Find out more about that in the review below.

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2021 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

2021 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

The Mid-Engine Ferrari V-6 Hybrid Is A Whole New Car That Slots Below The F8 Tributo But Could Be Faster

Announced at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show, the new Ferrari V-6 hybrid is ready for introduction this summer. Expected in a mid-engine form, the Ferrari with a hybridized V-6 propulsion system will probably slot below the F8 Tributo and ride on a modular platform that will underpin at least one more Ferrari supercar in the future. Maybe the one with the V-8 hybrid system.

Chief Technical Officer Michael Leiters presented Ferrari’s product strategy back in September in 2018 and announced the new Ferrari V-6 family:

"We will develop a totally new V6 family based on a very, very particular, innovative architecture with plenty of innovations regarding technologies and components."
We spied the Ferrari V-6 hybrid in prototype form in Sweden and Germany. Our spy photographers heard V-6 sounds while some videos, filmed in Maranello before that, apparently show the Ferrari V-6 hybrid running on electric power only. Even though this may be the case for the prototype, I doubt that the Ferrari V-6 mid-engine supercar will have an only-electric drive mode. However, Ferrari marketing head, Enrico Galleria reported some time ago that the Ferrari hybrid GT cars will probably have a Plug-In Hybrid technology. The Purosangue SUV as well!

Now, we have our first look at the first Ferrari Hybrid V-6 as it was doing some cold-weather testing.

Update 5/29/2019:Ferrari has just debuted the all-new SF90 Stradale, a V-8, hybrid supercar that is already stealing a lot of thunder from the Ferrari LaFerrari. Check out our special gallery below to get your first look while we update this review!

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2018 Ferrari Monza SP2

2018 Ferrari Monza SP2

It’s the Ferrari 812 with classic styling and seating for two

Ferrari’s shock launch of two brand-new super cars, the Monza SP1 and SP2 put everyone under the pressure of a choice: to go or not go solo. The SP2 is the Barchetta that encourages you to be friendly and take someone with you for the passenger ride of a lifetime aboard the fastest non-hybrid Prancing Horse ever – with no windshield!

The Icona line of special, limited run cars is off to a scorching start with two new beauties dubbed the SP1 and the SP2 Monza. The name isn’t new; instead, just like the cars, it draws from Ferrari’s long and storied racing heritage. The Monza was one of Ferrari’s Barchetta-style sports racing cars from the ‘50s which had its successes on the track but faded into obscurity in the decades that followed. It’s nice to see Ferrari bringing back this nameplate, especially on such eye-wateringly beautiful cars.

It’s good to know that the Icona program is set to run for at least four years, so we’re certain we’ll see more amazing products coming their way considering Louis Camilleri assertion that Ferrari looks to debut up to 15 new cars in the following years. The scope is to increase the sales to $5,000,000,000 by 2022 which would be a 68% increase from the figure registered at the end of last year.

While we’re almost sure that some of those sales will come off of the launch of Ferrari’s much-rumored SUVs, we’ve got to live in the moment and enjoy the Monza SP1 and SP2 for what they are: Ferrari’s fastest non-hybrid cars. The fact that they follow the old norm of a front-mounted V-12 sending the power to the back wheels is just the cream atop an amazing pie.

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2018 Ferrari Monza SP1

2018 Ferrari Monza SP1

A modern Ferrari car with a classic twist

Ferrari shocks everyone again and launches two open-top sports cars for the road as part of a new program called Icona. They are the Monza SP1 and SP2; they look like bonkers re-imagined ‘50s racers, and will be made in very limited quantities – all of which have been already sold.

Just as I was lamenting the other day about the disappearance of coachbuilding, Ferrari decides to get up and unveil a whole new line of cars under the Icona moniker. We know about Ferrari’s Special Projects program that builds one-off models, sometimes starting from a clean piece of paper, for Maranello’s most-trusted and respected buyers. The cars that will come through the Icona program won’t be one-offs, but you still won’t see more than 200 made of each. That’s, apparently, how many new Monzas they will build and, despite a $1,400,000 price tag, all have been sold. Indeed, it’s a cheap price to ask considering a one-off Ferrari – for which all slots have been reserved all the way until 2021 – starts at about $3,000,000.

With the occasion of Ferrari’s Capital Markets Day, the Italian automaker debuted the Icona program on the premises of its new Centro Stile facility in Maranello. The program, which is slated to run until 2022 for the very least, will see more cars built using the same recipe: design philosophy that harkens back to the old days in combination with the latest Ferrari underpinnings.

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1965 Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake

1965 Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake

The Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake by Vignale is as radical a departure from the production 330 GT 2+2 as one can imagine. It is a two-door station wagon Prancing Horse from the ‘60s that can sit four and reach 150 mph. You will not see another one like it, ever.

The ‘60s were an era when coachbuilding was still happening and it’s when many designers took it upon themselves to create unique reinterpretations of already outlandish sports cars. Such an outlandish reinterpretation was the Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake. It was based off of Ferrari’s then-new 330 GT 2+2, the Italian automaker’s fledging long-distance Grand Tourer that replaced the 250 GTE 2+2 and the 330 America in the lineup.

The bodywork you se now on the car, though, has nothing to do with the Tom Tjaarda-penned original coachwork. The shooting brake design was a joint effort between Luigi Chinetti, Jr. who acquired the car for this project and Bob Peak, the man commonly cited as being behind the way movie posters look nowadays.

Mechanically, chassis #09763 is broadly identical to any other 330 GT, but the clothes it wears are what sets it apart. The Vignale-built body, which has almost none of the components from the donor, is an acquired taste, which may be why the car’s been struggling to find a buyer for a few years now. It was once part of Jay Kay’s collection of Ferrari but has since seen the premises of many auction houses and dealers and is currently up for grabs again at The Petersen Automotive Museum auction on December 8th.

The asking price for what is, by all accounts, the last Ferrari to be bodied by Vignale – and one of the wackiest of the lot – is that of two Ferrari 488s full spec’ed out. Is it worth it? Read on to find out!

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2019 Ferrari 488 Pista Spider

2019 Ferrari 488 Pista Spider

Maranello’s most powerful V-8 car goes topless

The Ferrari 488 Pista Spider joined the 488 lineup at the 2018 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance as a replacement for the 458 Speciale Aperta. The Ferrari 488 Pista replaced the iconic 458 Speciale, and it’s the first of its kind to hide a turbocharged engine under the hood.

Just when we thought that Ferrari settled for the Aperta name for its convertible sports car, Maranello returned to using the old Spider badge. But this is arguably a small issue here, as the Pista Aperta is just as exciting as its coupe sibling, but with extra headroom when the top is removed. The 50th drop-top model built by Ferrari since 1947, the Pista Spider made its global debut in the United States, where convertible sports cars are more popular than everywhere else in the world. Let’s have a closer look at the latest member of the 488 family in the review below..

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 Pista Spider.

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2006 Ferrari 599 GTB

2006 Ferrari 599 GTB

The classic grand tourer formula, amplified for the 21st century

Ferrari is known for many things, but its line of V-12-powered front-engine GT cars is arguably one the Prancing Horse’s most important contributions to the world of sports cars. With models like the 250 TR Testarossa, 365 GTB/4 “Daytona,” and 250 GT California Spider, the formula has worked wonders for the brand, evoking a feeling of lust among collectors and enthusiasts alike thanks to a combination of gorgeous styling, easy drivability, and incredible 12-cylinder-flavored performance. Such is the case for the more contemporary Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano, which stood as Ferrari’s grand tourer flagship model between 2006 and 2012.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2007 - 2012 Ferrari 599 GTB.

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1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

1968 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

Maranello’s answer to the Porsche 911

In 1968, Ferrari had been on the market as a road car manufacturer for 21 years and was already enjoying massive success. It had already won the Formula One championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans and launched iconic cars like the 250 GTO, 275 GTB, and the 400 Superamerica. However, the cars were very expensive, and Ferrari was looking for a shot at the more affordable sports car market. And it created the Dino for this exact purpose.

Launched in 1968, the first Dino was called the 206 GT. Powered by a 2.0-liter V-6, it was designed by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti and produced until 1969. The Dino was updated in 1969 and renamed the 246 GT. A convertible model called the GTS was also introduced. The original Dino was phased out in 1974, but a redesigned model called the 308 GT4 was launched in 1973 and kept into production until 1980. That’s when the Dino brand was dropped altogether, and Ferrari’s next affordable sports car was called the Mondial.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari Dino 206 GT.

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1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE)

1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE)

A genuine four-seater sports car

While the Prancing Horse is best known for its top-shelf performance vehicles and winning racing machines, even Maranello’s finest must occasionally bend to the whims of the passenger vehicle market. But don’t see it as a compromise - rather, it’s best seen as a combination of speed and usability, catapulting the commonplace people mover to the extraordinary realm of apexes and checkered flags. Such is the case with the Ferrari 250 GT 2+2, the brand’s first genuine four-seater model.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1960 - 1963 Ferrari 250 GT 2+2 (GTE).

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1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2

1964 - 1967 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2

If only James Bond was Italian...

The 330 GT 2+2 was actually an update to the 330 America that Ferrari built in 1963 only. It also replaced the 250 GT/E 2+2, but it was larger and sportier. Introduced in 1964, the 330 GT 2+2 was upgraded in 1965, when the Series II model with a new design was launched. Production lasted until 1967, with 1,099 examples built until the Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 was introduced as a replacement. The cool thing about these cars is that they’ve remained somewhat affordable compared to other million-dollar Ferraris from the era.

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2004 - 2011 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti

2004 - 2011 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti

Bridging the gap between the 456 and the FF

In 2003, the Ferrari 456 was discontinued after 11 years in production. The grand tourer, which had been updated to 456M specs in 1998, was then replaced by the 612 Scaglietti. Designed by Ken Okuyama and Frank Stephenson, the 612 Scaglietti was bigger than the 456, and thus it was a true four-seater rather than a 2+2 GT like its predecessor. Named in honor of Sergio Scaglietti, who designed many Ferraris in the 1950s, including the 250 Testa Rossa, the 612 also pays homage to the 375 MM that company director Roberto Rossellini had commissioned for his wife, Ingrid Bergman, in 1954.

Unlike its forerunner, the 612 was an all-aluminum vehicle and the second following the 360 Modena. Developed with Alcoa, the space frame was later used in the 599 GTB. The GT also came with a redesigned engine. While the 456 used a 5.5-liter V-12, the 612 received the larger mill from the 575 Superamerica. While the "612" badge suggests a 6.0-liter engine, the displacement was actually 5.7 liters. Produced at the Carrozzeria Scaglietti plant, the 612 was taken to Maranello to have its interior and V-12 put in. A total of 3025 cars were produced until 2011 when the 612 was replaced by the FF. Ferrari also produced a series of limited-edition model, but more about that in the review below.

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2018 Ferrari 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari

2018 Ferrari 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari

You need to be a Ferrari racing driver to be able to buy it

It’s been only three months since the hardcore Ferrari 488 Pista was unveiled at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, and the Maranello-based firm has already created a special edition of the supercar. Designed to celebrate the 488’s success on the race track, it’s called the 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari and made its debut ahead of the iconic 24 Hours of Le Mans race.

Inspired by AF Corse’s no. 51 car, with which Alessandro Pier Guidi and James Calado won the 2017 FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC) Drivers’ and Manufacturers’ titles, the Pista Piloti Ferrari is available exclusively to customers involved in the company’s motorsport programs. In short, if you’re not racing a race-spec version of the 488, be it a GT3 or a GTE, you can’t buy one. That’s a bit harsh from the Italians, but let’s a have a closer look at what you’re missing if you’re not involved in this program.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 Pista Piloti Ferrari.

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2018 Ferrari SP38

2018 Ferrari SP38

Based on the 488 GTB, only one made

Introduced in 2015 as a replacement for the 458 Italia, the Ferrari 488 GTB is already an iconic supercar. It already spawned a topless, Spider version, as well as a replacement for the 458 Speciale, called the 488 Pista. Racing duties go to the 488 GTE and 488 GT3 for the most coveted classes in the FIA-governed championships. Much like its predecessor, it was also used for a custom limited-edition model, called the J50 and built in just ten units to celebrate 50 years since the Italian brand arrived in Japan. Come 2018 and Ferrari rolled off yet another bespoke model. It’s called the SP38, and only one will ever see the light of day.

Developed by company’s One-Off program, the SP38 was designed by the Ferrari Design Center on the chassis and running gear of the 488 GTB. It was unveiled at Ferrari’s Fiorano test track, where it was handed over to one of the company’s most dedicated customers. The new supercar will be on public display for the first time at the 2018 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este before it will find its way in a heated garage. Needless to say, the SP38 is the most intriguing version of the 488 GTB yet, and it will probably become a highly sought-after collectible in a few years.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari SP38.

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2018 Ferrari 488 Pista

2018 Ferrari 488 Pista

The highly anticipated successor to the 458 Speciale!

Ferrari has developed a fairly predictable pattern when it comes to releasing mid-engine V-8 models. First, we get the "regular" one, and then the lighter, faster, more powerful road-racer variant follows. In 2015, Ferrari replaced the iconic 458 Italia with the turbocharged, 488 GTB. Three years later and the successor to the 458 Speciale is here with more power, less weight, and improved aerodynamics. It’s called the 488 Pista, and it’s set to make its global debut at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show in March.

The successor to Ferrari’s much acclaimed, V-8-engined special series, which includes the 360 Challenge Stradale, 430 Scuderia, and the 458 Speciale, the 488 Pista is yet another homage to Ferrari’s outstanding heritage in motorsport. Much like its predecessors, the Pista was also developed using knowledge from the company’s involvement in the FIA World Endurance Championship, in which it has won five manufacturers’ titles. Both the race-spec 488 GTE and 488 Challenge served as inspiration for the Pista, also "donating" some of their dynamics and aerodynamic developments.

The 488 Pista is described as Ferrari’s most powerful and most advanced special series model so far. Let’s find out if it’s true in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 488 Pista.

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1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 “Daytona”

1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 “Daytona”

A Prancing Horse hungry for miles

These days, if its front-engine Italian grand touring that you’re after, the Ferrari 812 Superfast is the latest and greatest. While impressive in and of itself, the new 812 hails from a long line of F/R GT cars from the highly celebrated marque. In fact, we can trace its roots all the way back to this – the Ferrari Daytona. Originally dubbed the 365 GTB/4, this angular classic was popularized as the “Daytona” after Ferrari swept the podium at the 24 Hours of Daytona in 1967, and the name stuck ever since (even though Ferrari still insists on calling it the 365 GTB/4). First introduced at the 1968 Paris Auto Show, the Daytona was ushered in as a replacement for the Ferrari 275 GTB/4, and came equipped with a larger Colombo V-12 engine, independent suspension, and the right stuff for high-speed cruising.

The Daytona was offered in two distinct body styles, including the GTB/4 Berlinetta, and the much more rare GTS/4 Spider. A handful of racing versions were created as well. Production lasted until 1973 with nearly 1,300 units built in total, after which the mid-engine 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer replaced the Daytona in 1973. Now, the Daytona is a classic collectible automobile, with some examples easily eclipsing the seven-figure mark at auction. So what makes it so great? Read on to find out.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 Daytona.

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2017 Ferrari 488 Spider N-Largo by Novitec Rosso

2017 Ferrari 488 Spider N-Largo by Novitec Rosso

Convertible 488 gets a shots of aero and power from noted tuner

What’s possible within the aftermarket tuning scene? That’s a question I’ve heard from a lot of people, and while I can’t fully inform them of the specific benefits of going this route with their vehicles, I do tell them that “anything’s possible” when it comes to this world, especially if you have a vivid imagination and deep pockets. Take Novitec for example. The German tuner is famous for building programs for some of the world’s most exquisite exotics, including today’s lineup of Ferrari sports and supercars. Responsible for these kits is Novitec Rosso, and it’s just announced its latest tuning program for one of Maranello’s most recent models, the Ferrari 488 Spider.

Those who are familiar with Novitec’s N-Largo kit will know that the tuner has already unveiled a similar kit for a handful of other Ferrari supercars, including the F12 and the hardtop version of the Ferrari 488. The program’s formula is pretty simple too: drop a load of aerodynamic components, piece them all together, and then work on getting more power out of the engine. Suffice to say, that’s exactly what Novitec Rosso did to the 488 Spider, and the results are exactly what you’d expect them to be from a tuner that has about as excellent a reputation as any company of its kind in the business.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Ferrari 488 Spider N-Largo by Novitec Rosso

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