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The Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Just Proved Itself Against the Ferrari 812 Superfast and Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

The Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Just Proved Itself Against the Ferrari 812 Superfast and Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

Ford really nailed it with the new Shelby GT500

Ford did a lot of things right with the Mustang Shelby GT500. It updated the Voodoo 5.2-liter V-8 used by the Shelby GT350 with a 2.65-liter supercharger, ditched the innovative flat-plane crank design of the GT350, and went for a more traditional cross-plane crankshaft, all while considerably upping the power output.

Plus, we don’t have to tell you just how much weight the Shelby name holds in the automotive industry. Then again, so does Ferrari. Or Porsche. However, as you’re about to see, that wasn’t enough to throw off the Shelby GT500.

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Butthurt Incoming: Ferrari Says Designing Cars for Women is a “Mistake”

Butthurt Incoming: Ferrari Says Designing Cars for Women is a “Mistake”

Yeah; you read that right – MISTAKE — but they are right

You would think that designing a car tailored to women would help drive more of a female customer base to the Ferrari brand but, apparently, that’s not true. At All. In a recent interview with Arabian Business Ferrari NV’s Chief Marketing and Commercial Officer said that designing cars for women is a “mistake,” but are we taking it out of context? Yeah; probably.

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2020 Ferrari Roma

2020 Ferrari Roma

Ferrari has introduced the Roma, a car that is considered to be the most elegant and exotic Ferrari ever made. It features the latest concept of “Nuove Dolce Vita” (New Sweet Life) design that improves on a number of things, the most important of which is aerodynamics. The Roma has a traditional shark nose up front with linear LED headlights while the side profile is void of the usual side shields – a move that harkens back to the 1950s. The rear end features and active spoiler and a compact diffuser that just exudes the car’s sporty and performance-oriented nature.

The interior has an evolved version of the of the dual-cockpit concept that includes an individual cell for the driver and passenger – a design that gives the passenger the feeling of being a co-pilot. Interior materials include:

Full-grain Frau leather Alcantara Chromed aluminum Carbon fiber

Power comes from a 3.0-liter V-8 that’s good for 612 horsepower and 561 pound-feet of torque – the former of which represents a 20-horsepower increase over the car it’s based on. The Roma, in this specification, can reach 62.1 mph (100 km/h) in 3.4 seconds on the way to a top speed of 200 mph. Ferrari has yet to release pricing details, but word has it that an MSRP of at least $225,000 is expected.

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Ferrari Delays Its EV Plans, But It Has Absolutely Nothing to Do With Financial Stability

Ferrari Delays Its EV Plans, But It Has Absolutely Nothing to Do With Financial Stability

Don’t worry - The company will still be here...

Word has been circling that Ferrari has delayed its plans to shift into building EVs until 2025, and it’s 100-percent true. Some outlets, however, would have you believe that Ferrari might not even be around by then – @FredericLambert from Electrek, I’m looking at you. The truth is that there’s a good reason that Ferrari has decided to push its plans for an EV from roughly 2023 to 2025 or later.

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2020 Ferrari 812 GTS vs. 2020 Mercedes-AMG S 65 Cabriolet

2020 Ferrari 812 GTS vs. 2020 Mercedes-AMG S 65 Cabriolet

As far as grunty open-top luxury cars go, the 812 GTS and the S 65 can be considered the creme de la creme

They might share the same engine configuration, but the 2020 Ferrari 812 GTS and the 2020 Mercedes-AMG S 65 Cabriolet are two very different dishes. One’s naturally aspirated while the other uses the magic of forced induction. One is a purpose-built supercar while the other is the open-top version of one of the most luxurious full-size sedan you can buy today.

But here at Top Speed we have a knack for dissecting things, so we thought an in-depth comparison between the 812 GTS and the Mercedes-AMG S 65 Cabrio would be equally useful and interesting, even as they come from two different worlds.

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The Ferrari Roma Is a Callback to the Past and a Look Into the Future

The Ferrari Roma Is a Callback to the Past and a Look Into the Future

This is the fifth all-new Ferrari that has been unveiled this year

Ferrari’s run of new model releases in 2019 now includes the Roma, a two-seater supercar that pays tribute to the Italian automaker’s roots while also showcasing a new interior layout that could lay the foundation on what future Ferraris could look like — at least as far as interiors go — in the future.

The Roma joins the F8 Tributo, F8 Tributo Spider, 812 GTS, and SF90 Stradale as all-new Ferraris that the Italian automaker unveiled this year. It is fitting that what could be the last of this new model assault is the one that bridges the past with the future. Ferrari hasn’t revealed the price and availability of its new supercar, but expect more details to arrive soon.

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Ferrari's One-Off Creations is A List of the Most Desirable Prancing Horses of All Time

Ferrari’s One-Off Creations is A List of the Most Desirable Prancing Horses of All Time

It literally can’t get any better than a one-off

Back in 2008, Ferrari launched its One-Off personalization program to a lot of fanfare at that year’s Geneva Motor Show. The goal was to give Maranello’s most important clients the opportunity to create their own Ferraris. It’s been over a decade since that announcement, and it’s safe to say that Ferrari’s program has become a resounding success. Every year, a number of one-off Ferraris enter our lives, commissioned by an individual who Ferrari deems as one of its VIPs. Models like the 2012 Ferrari SP Arya, 2014 Ferrari SP FFX, and 2018 Ferrari SP38 Deborah have been built. Each of these one-offs is unique from every other Ferrari in existence, largely because they came to life as a result of someone’s vision for his or her perfect Ferrari. The 2019 Ferrari P80/C is the latest one-off Ferrari to arrive, but given the success Ferrari has had with the program and the growing demand among customers to get their own “1of1s” — there’s a five-year waitlist, in case you qualify — the P80/C won’t be the last one-off Ferrari in the world. On the contrary, this first ten years of the whole program could be just the beginning of what will most likely turn into one of Ferrari’s most successful customer-centric programs in its long and illustrious history. In case you haven’t paid attention over the last ten years, check out some of the most memorable one-off models that Ferrari has created.

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The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

The 10 Best Ferraris Of All Time

From classics to current exotics, Maranello has a long and rich history of performance car excellence

Picking the ten best Ferraris of all time is not an easy exercise, but somebody had to do it. Sports cars don’t come finer than those with a Prancing Horse badge, and in the 70 years that it has been around, Ferrari has built some of the finest and most desirable performance cars in the history of the industry. A lot of Ferrari models have climbed the ladder to iconic status, and even some of today’s models are on their way there, too. It took a lot of work — and arguments — but we managed to narrow down our choices for the ten best Ferraris of all time.

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1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

1962 Ferrari 250 California SWB Spider by Scaglietti

Maybe the most beautiful open-top car that money can buy

The entire Ferrari 250 line seems to have secured its place in the palace of automotive royalties for generations to come. With unmistakable lines, a variety of powerful but also reliable Colombo V-12s, and limited-run production, almost all of the late-50s to early-60s Ferrari 250 models command astronomical values at auction nowadays.

There are, of course, some stars that shine brighter than others, such as the 250 GTO, the 250 GT SWB, and, lastly, the 250 California SWB Spider built between 1960 and 1962. This is one of those short-wheelbase California Spiders but, despite its originality, it lacks the aura of the ex-Alain Delon ’barn find’ that sold for $18.5 million four years ago.

Besides the fact that Alain Delon once owned and thrashed that particular 250 California SWB Spider, what made it even more desirable were its covered headlights. Amazingly, the more sought after variant is, actually, the one Ferrari made more of: a total of 37,250 California SWB Spiders left the factory with covered headlights and just 19 were optioned without the glass over the twin circular headlamps. Read on to learn more about the strange case of a buyer-induced trend that goes against the otherwise untouchable principle of rarity.

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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

The mid-’60s Ferrari that dreams are made of

The Ferrari 275 GTB is widely considered to be one of the prettiest grand touring cars built during the sizzling ’60s. Displaying an evolutionary design language influenced by Ferrari’s glorious 250-series models such as the 250 GTO and the 250 GTE 2+2, the 275 GTB came in both short-nose and long-nose specification, with the 3.3-liter Colombo V-12 first featuring two overhead camshafts before Ferrari introduced, in 1967, the 275 GTB/4 with four overhead camshafts. This here is a Series II 275 GTB or, in other words, a long-nosed version built towards the end of the GTB’s production run in 1966. It’s one of the last of just a few dozen 275 GTBs with an all-aluminum body shell that makes the car both lighter and rust-proof. Too bad it’s as expensive as a handful of Ferrari F40s.

Even fans of modern supercars and wedge-shaped obscurities from the ’80s would oftentimes come together and agree that the GTs made in the ’60s are a sight to behold: elongated noses, low rooflines, and a tail that usually ends with a stubby Kammback. It’s a well-known recipe and few applied it better than Ferrari. Designed by the house of Pininfarina, by now an integral part of the Maranello-based manufacturer, the 275 GTB came to sweepingly replace all of the 250-series models. It was designed to be more user-friendly, more practical, but without giving up on performance or the unique feeling of being behind the wheel of a Ferrari. Included by many publications on shortlists of the prettiest Ferraris of all time, the 275 GTB was also a successful race car and it also spawned an open-top version in the N.A.R.T.-commissioned 275 GTS/4 Spyders built between 1967 and 1968 (the 275 GTS featured a completely different Pininfarina body while the N.A.R.T. cars featured Scaglietti bodies in the style of Pininfarina’s Berlinetta design).

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Cool Quirks About The New Ferrari 812 GTS

Cool Quirks About The New Ferrari 812 GTS

Ferrari 812 GTS Is Probably The Last V-12-only Open-Top Car Ferrari Will Ever Produce

Just a day after the first Ferrari F1 Scuderia win at Monza since 2010, the Maranello-based car producer revealed two astonishing open-top cars. The elite of the world got a chance to buy, or the hope they’ll be able to buy the V-12 powered 812 GTS and the F8 Spider. Interestingly enough, the F8, as a mid-engine, V-8 powered Spider captures the essence of Ferrari’s future.

On the other hand, the 812 GTS, as the first production V-12 powered, front-engined open-top Ferrari in almost fifty years, is the one that wholeheartedly captures the essence of the brand. With an overpowered V-12 that develops 790 horsepower, rear-wheel drive, and a roof that opens in 14 seconds, the 812 GTS is a swan song. The Ferrari 812 GTS may well be the last new V-12 powered open-top car we ever see. This alone makes it far more appealing than any other open-top car on the market.

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2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

2020 Ferrari F8 Spider

Ferrari’s replacement for the 488 Spider is just as powerful as the track-ready 488 Pista

The Ferrari F8 Spider is the convertible version of the F8 Tributo. It replaces the outgoing Ferrari 488 Spider in the lineup and just like its coupe counterpart, it features technology and underpinnings from the track-bred 488 Pista. While not as dynamic as the 488 Pista Spider, it’s a solid improvement over the 488 Spider. The F8 Spider joins a prestigious bloodline of drop-top V-8 sports cars that begun with the iconic 308 GTS back in 1977.

Ferrari’s most powerful V-8 convertible alongside the 488 Pista Spider, the F8 Spider arrives just in time to compete with the Lamborghini Huracan Evo Spyder. It also goes against the McLaren 720S Spider, yet another fine example of the high-performance sports car market. Find out what sets apart the F8 Spider from its predecessors and how it compares with its rivals in the detailed review below.

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2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

2020 Ferrari 812 GTS

The front-engined, V-12 convertible GT returns after 50 years

The Ferrari 812 GTS is the convertible version of the 812 Superfast, the grand tourer that replaced the F12berlinetta in 2017. Ferrari’s range-topping drop-top as of 2019, the 812 GTS is also the company’s first production, front-engined, V-12 convertible since 1969. After 20 years of limited edition grand tourers with infinite headroom, Ferrari finally caved in a build a production-ready, drop-top grand tourer.

Besides the "GTS" badge and the minor changes above the waistline, this drop-top is pretty much identical to the 812 Superfast. It has the same 6.5-liter V-12 engine under the hood and comes with almost 800 horsepower on tap. It needs less than three seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start and tops out at more than 200 mph. All told, it’s one of the most potent grand tourers on the market and a turning point for Ferrari, which just released its first full-production convertible GT in 50 years. Find out more about that in the review below.

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Ferrari Thinks It's Too Good To Offer an “Entry-Level” Model

Ferrari Thinks It’s Too Good To Offer an “Entry-Level” Model

Hoping to spend less than $200,00 for a new Ferrari? Not Gonna Happen

It wasn’t that long ago that Ferrari offered a simple, entry-level model known as the California. It carried an MSRP – as of 2018 – that started at right around $120,000 for the base model. It may have increased to more than $300,000 in higher trim levels, but the point is that you could step into a brand-new Ferrari for what some Ferrari customers would consider pocket change. The die-hard purists weren’t too fond of such a “cheap” model, but it served a real purpose – it allowed those who otherwise couldn’t afford a Ferrari to own a prancing horse.

With the California officially discontinued as of the end of 2018, Ferrari’s cheapest model is now the Ferrari Portofino with a starting price of around $215,000. Ferrari was expected to revive the Dino name, which was associated with affordability in the 60s and 70s, on a new entry-level model and spiritual successor the original Dino. Ferrari now says that isn’t going to happen – here’s why.

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1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale by Ghia

A one-off coupé based on the Ferrari 375 MM race car

The 1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupé Speciale is a one-off version of the iconic 375 MM bodied by Italian coach builder Ghia. The Ferrari 375 MM was built from 1953 until 1955. It was developed as a race car, but some were converted to road use. One of only nine road-going coupés built on the 375 MM chassis, the Coupé Speciale is also the only 375 design by Ghia and the last Ferrari built by the company. The car was showcased at the 1955 Torino Motor Show and was then shipped to Robert Wilke, owner of the Leader Card Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

A racing fan, Wilke, who sponsored an IndyCar team from the 1930s until his death in 1970, was also a personal friend of Enzo Ferrari. The 375 MM Coupé Speciale was one of seven unique vehicles that Ferrari built for the businessman, but it’s the most historically significant vehicle owned by him. Also one of the most documented Ferraris in existence, the Coupé Speciale changed hands several times since the 1970s. Come 2019 and it’s going under the hammer to find a new owner at RM Sotheby’s car sale in Monterey on August 15-17.

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Ferrari Is Threatening to Sue Someone Over Something Stupid...Again

Ferrari Is Threatening to Sue Someone Over Something Stupid...Again

Is Ferrari acting like a grouch again or does it have a case this time?

There are companies and brands that are protective of their trademarks and properties. Then there’s Ferrari. The Italian automaker is known far and wide for being extremely protective of its intellectual property to the point that it will go after anyone who uses its logos and trademarks for their personal use, especially if the use of said logos and trademarks do not reflect Ferrari’s standards. The latest to feel Ferrari’s wrath is German fashion designer Philipp Plein, who received what amounts to a “cease-and-desist” letter from Ferrari’s attorneys, demanding the removal of photos Plein took of one of his signature sneakers on top of his Ferrari 812 Superfast. The photo was posted on his Instagram account, and Ferrari was none-too-pleased about it.

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Do You Dream of Owning a One-Off Ferrari? It's Not As Easy to Obtain as You Might Think

Do You Dream of Owning a One-Off Ferrari? It’s Not As Easy to Obtain as You Might Think

It’s a long wait, but all that waiting will be worth it in the end

Owning a Ferrari is relatively easy provided that you have the money to spend to buy one. But owning a Ferrari? That’s a different story altogether. See, there are tiers when it comes to the kinds of Ferrari owners. Most people own one or two Ferraris and call it a day. They’re “regular” Ferrari owners if such a thing even exists. Then there’s the more exclusive club reserved for Ferrari’s top clients. These are the people who don’t just buy one or two Ferraris; they buy all of them, or at least most of them. These people are such regular customers that they get invited to an exclusive club that has access to the most exclusive of exclusive Ferraris: the one-offs.

Ferrari’s most important clients have opportunities to own one-off Ferraris that they themselves commission Ferrari to build for them. But just because they have that privilege doesn’t mean that Ferrari will build them a one-off model on a whim. The growing trend for one-off Ferraris comes in response to the increasing demand from clients to get their hands on a Ferrari that no other person in the world has. In turn, that demand has created a waitlist that can take up to four or five years to accommodate. We can argue whether a four- or five-year wait is too long, but it seems that no one is making a big fuss about it given how long the waitlist has become.

And considering the latest one-off that Ferrari just released — the Ferrari P80/C — there’s a case to be made that all that waiting will be worth it once the one-off model comes to life.

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Now We Finally Know Just How the 2020 Ferrari SF90 Stradale's Powertrain Modes Work

Now We Finally Know Just How the 2020 Ferrari SF90 Stradale’s Powertrain Modes Work

Ferrari Driving Modes Completely Change The 2020 SF90 Nature From Tame To Savage

With three electric motors, an AWD system, a massively overpowered V-8, and the most advanced aerodynamic setup, the latest 2020 Ferrari SF90 Stradale has some serious performance to offer. I am talking here about hypercar-beating numbers. With all the complexity, three electric motors, and lightweight design, engineers managed to engineer a car so advanced it has a sort of dissociative identity disorder condition. By switching through the modes on the lower left side of the steering wheel, you can choose between four very different driving modes. Ferrari published a video depicting its functions, and I will give you an overview.

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Ferrari Is Bringing Three Brothers to the 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed

Ferrari Is Bringing Three Brothers to the 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed

If you go to the 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed you’ll be in for quite a treat as Ferrari will show off two unique Special Projects cars

The Goodwood Festival of Speed is the perfect excuse for some of the world’s most amazing cars (and bikes) to gather for a few days on Lord March’s driveway that acts as a hillclimb course. This year, the venue near Chichester in West Sussex will welcome a special delegation straight from Maranello as Ferrari will officially display for the very first time two of its Special Projects cars. On top of that, the Ferrari Monza SP2 part of the ’Icona’ series of limited-run models made to as an ode to some of Ferrari’s past legends.

Founded in 1993 by Lord March, who later became the 11th Duke of Richmond, the Goodwood Festival of Speed brought back the glamour of motor racing to Goodwood, a track that used to host popular Tourist Trophy races in the ’50s and ’60s. The road course itself is not used during the Festival of Speed that instead sees cars drive up and down Lord March’s tight driveway. The track is used during the annual Goodwood Members’ Meeting event and the Goodwood Revival. As is the case every year, the 2019 Goodwood FoS will see hundreds of classic cars - most of them racing cars although some supercars and other exotics are always part of the show - take to the course, many of them driven by their original drivers from back in the day. While Aston Martin will be this year’s celebrated marque 60 years after its first and (so far) only Le Mans win, Ferrari plans to steal the show with a trifecta of cars that you probably won’t see together again ever.

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 5 Incredible Ferrari Special Edition Cars

5 Incredible Ferrari Special Edition Cars

Ferrari Actually Produced A Car It Did Not Know About

Just after Ferrari presented their awe-inspiring Monza SP-1 and the Monza SP-2 cars, I had an idea I simply had to explore. For mine and, consequently, your good, I researched a little bit (not a little bit, but quite a bit actually) about the most amazing special edition cars Ferrari ever built. Apart from the Monza SP-1 and the Monza SP-2 I find striking, I am presenting you five other Ferrari special edition cars which proved to be as sensational as the best that ever came out of the Maranello factory. You may call me shortsighted, or whatever, but I did not include any of the V-8 powered Special Edition Ferrari cars. You know what, if you already have the money to spend on a freaking special edition Ferrari that costs millions of dollars, then go all out and buy a proper one - with the V-12. Call me mad, an idiot or just a dumb car guy, but the V-8 powered Ferrari Special Edition can’t be as good as the V-12 powered Ferrari Special Edition car. I found five mesmerizing ones.

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How Much will the 2021 Ferrari SF90 Cost?

How Much will the 2021 Ferrari SF90 Cost?

Since there’s no such thing as a cheap Ferrari and this ain’t no ordinary Ferrari, prepare yourself for a few robberies to afford it

Ferrari undoubtedly stole all of the headlines in the automotive world this week when it released the first official images of its next hypercar, the SF90 Stradale. Immediately, people started touting it as the "replacement for the LaFerrari," but this isn’t the case. No, the SF90 Stradale is just Ferrari’s first PHEV and just the most powerful Ferrari road car ever made with a combined output of 986 horsepower, 37 more than the LaFerrari. What this means is that it will be expensive but not as expensive as you think it’ll be and it also won’t be as rare as you think it’ll be since Ferrari won’t make it in limited quantities like in the case of the LaFerrari or the Enzo.

Now, before I jump into hiding to dodge any rocks that may be heading my way, let me tell you that, upon seeing the SF90 Stradale, I thought it looks a bit uninspiring for it to be the next Ferrari halo car. Not that it’s ugly as such, it just doesn’t stand out the way a LaFerrari, an Enzo or an F40 all do in their own very specific ways. Of course, the SF90 Stradale does stand out when you look at the numbers: 986 horsepower from a twin-turbocharged V-8 working together with three electric motors, 590 pound-feet of twist just from the V-8, a dry weight of just 3,461 pounds in its track-oriented guise, 0-62 mph in 2.5 seconds, 0-124 mph in 6.7 seconds, and a top speed in excess of 211 mph. Oh, and it’s also quicker around Fiorano than the LaFerrari.

Now, after successfully bombarding you with all these numbers you’ve most likely read before, I’ll tell you why I think the SF90 Stradale really matters: it matters because it’s very much the future, a car that utilizes F1 tech to the point that Ferrari have named it after its current F1 contender and only added the ’Stradale’ designation, one that’s been dormant for some 15 years, to signal to everyone that, yes, indeed, you can take it out to shop for groceries and, in fact, it can go in all-electric mode for 16 miles, more than a Honda Accord PHEV. So, how much will you have to pay for a Ferrari that allows you to drive more than an Accord while holding hands with nature?

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Your Car Has Something That the Ferrari SF90 Stradale Doesn't Have

Your Car Has Something That the Ferrari SF90 Stradale Doesn’t Have

It’s something common that even some motorcycles have…

The Ferrari SF90 Stradale is, by far, the craziest car to ever come from the Italian brand’s stable. Maybe not so much in exterior design – not that it doesn’t have some pretty crazy aerodynamics – but in terms of equipment and performance. We’re talking about Ferrari’s first true, plug-in hybrid that, when set in the proper mode, can unleash as much as 986 horsepower and, probably, more than the advertised 590 pound-feet of torque. So, the car has some pretty awesome power for something that’ll likely cost less than $500,000, and it has a pretty dominating look. Hell, it even has a 16-inch digital display inside. With all of Ferrari’s latest technology packed into one hybrid vehicle, how is it possible that the car in your driveway – be it a 1990 Toyota Corolla or a brand-new Porsche 911 – has something that the brand-new Ferrari SF9 Stradale doesn’t have? Well, it is possible. And, believe it or not, it’s something that even some modern motorcycles have.

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