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Chris Harris in a Porsche Panamera Turbo Sport Turismo challenges Matt LeBlanc in a Ferrari GTC4Lusso V12

Chris Harris in a Porsche Panamera Turbo Sport Turismo challenges Matt LeBlanc in a Ferrari GTC4Lusso V12

Which family-friendly road rocket will come out on top?

Porsche and Ferrari aren’t necessarily renowned for their family friendly wagons, yet both actually offer such models in their lineup. Ferrari has the GTC4Lusso, a shooting brake with space for four, while Porsche has given us the Panamera Sport Turismo, an actual four-door estate with practicality to match its performance.

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1965 Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake

1965 Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake

The Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake by Vignale is as radical a departure from the production 330 GT 2+2 as one can imagine. It is a two-door station wagon Prancing Horse from the ‘60s that can sit four and reach 150 mph. You will not see another one like it, ever.

The ‘60s were an era when coachbuilding was still happening and it’s when many designers took it upon themselves to create unique reinterpretations of already outlandish sports cars. Such an outlandish reinterpretation was the Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake. It was based off of Ferrari’s then-new 330 GT 2+2, the Italian automaker’s fledging long-distance Grand Tourer that replaced the 250 GTE 2+2 and the 330 America in the lineup.

The bodywork you se now on the car, though, has nothing to do with the Tom Tjaarda-penned original coachwork. The shooting brake design was a joint effort between Luigi Chinetti, Jr. who acquired the car for this project and Bob Peak, the man commonly cited as being behind the way movie posters look nowadays.

Mechanically, chassis #09763 is broadly identical to any other 330 GT, but the clothes it wears are what sets it apart. The Vignale-built body, which has almost none of the components from the donor, is an acquired taste, which may be why the car’s been struggling to find a buyer for a few years now. It was once part of Jay Kay’s collection of Ferrari but has since seen the premises of many auction houses and dealers and is currently up for grabs again at The Petersen Automotive Museum auction on December 8th.

The asking price for what is, by all accounts, the last Ferrari to be bodied by Vignale – and one of the wackiest of the lot – is that of two Ferrari 488s full spec’ed out. Is it worth it? Read on to find out!

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1970 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Shooting Brake

1970 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Shooting Brake

The heyday of the coachbuilt luxury cars was back before WWII. As car became more complex machines the practice of having each body custom made became even more difficult and expensive. But for those willing to pay, it can still be done, and some of the oldest names in coachbuilding are still in operation. So when architect and home builder Bob Gittleman decided that he wanted something different for his car, it was possible to make that happen. Gittleman went to Chinetti Motors in New York, owned by legendary Italian racing driver Luigi Chinetti, and talked to Luigi’s son, Luigi Jr. (who went by “Coco”).

Gittleman simply asked for “something different” out of his car and Coco took it from there. He had always been fascinated by British coachbuilding and shooting brakes in particular, but also with Italian sports cars. So then used as the base was a then-new 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4, which was then sent to Panther Westwinds in Surrey, England for the coachwork. It is a very well executed job, and it has earned the car a certain degree of fame over the years. Not everyone is crazy about it, but it seems someone at Ferrari thought a Ferrari shooting brake was a good idea, because we now have the 2012 Ferrari FF.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Shooting Brake.

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Video: 1970 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser Vs 2012 Ferrari FF

Video: 1970 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser Vs 2012 Ferrari FF

"Generation Gap" is one of Motor Trend’s coolest shows. In each episode, two representatives of the same nameplate or body style, but from different generations, are compared in regards to their looks, performance and collectability. The co-hosts get to drive each of the cars and decide which wins in each of the aforementioned category. After that’s settled, the viewers get to cast their vote on which of the two vehicles is cooler and help determine a winner.

Last time we watched the show, Motor Trend brought together a 1967 Shelby GT500 and the 2010 GT500 Patriot Edition. A no-brainer if you ask me, but things have gotten a bit weird in the latest episode, which compares the Ferrari FF to a modified... wait for it... 1970 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser. Granted, both vehicle can haul a family of four, but other than that these cars are as different as chalk and cheese. One’s a state-of-the-art shooting brake wearing the most iconic badge of all time, while the other comes straight from the muscle car era and has no sporty intentions whatsoever.

However, the fact that the Vista Cruiser is powered by a supercharged, LS3 V-8 puts things on par as far as output is concerned, with both cars having nearly the same amount of power at their disposal. The FF cranks out 651 ponies, while the Olds comes with 650 horses on tap. Sure, the comparison is still somewhat ridiculous, but the 11-minute video is definitely worth a watching. See who wins the battle in by clicking the play button above and tell us which "cruiser" you’d vote and why in the comments box below.

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Unique 1960 Ferrari Rambler Wagon up for sale

Unique 1960 Ferrari Rambler Wagon up for sale

It may seem like an unholy union, the combination of a 1960 Nash Rambler Wagon and a Ferrari 360, but its definitely unique. The car known as the "Ferrambo" is ready for sale. The cross-breed between body of a Rambler and the 3.6L V8 engine from a 2002 Ferrari 360 Modena, with some major help from some custom fabrication. Much of the car is hand made, including the custom frame that accommodates the car behind the two front seats.

The car made such a big splash at the 2008 Detroit Autorama that it won the coveted Riddler award. It features a set of custom leather luggage related to the upholstery. Although the Ferrambo is not a car fits everyone’s tastes, it may just be the perfect expensive grocery-getter. Anyone interested may need deep pockets, because apparently the price is high. Information is available through the GP Imports, but there has not been an official price list provided yet.

Press release after the jump.

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