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2020 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

2020 Ferrari SF90 Stradale

There Is No Other Car In the World Like the Ferrari SF90 Stradale

Ferrari dropped the bomb. The biggest that has ever fallen on the car world scene. It is the plug-in hybrid Ferrari SF90 Stradale, a production car that is more powerful and quicker than the LaFerrari itself. Inspired by none other than the F1 car, the new Ferrari SF90 Stradale became the Ferrari-first plug-in hybrid with a propulsion technology consisting of three electric motors and an overpowered V-8. Aptly named after the Scuderia Ferrari’s 90th anniversary and, coincidentally, the 2019 Ferrari F1 car, the Ferrari SF90 Stradale is the closest to a Ferrari F1 car you can experience on public roads.

Ferrari unveiled the car at a special event where Ferrari F1 drivers Sebastien Vettel and Charles Leclerc drove two SF90 Stradale cars onto the scene.

Disclosure: this is not the Ferrari LaFerrari successor. It is a whole new car that does not follow the F40, F50, Enzo, and the LaFerrari lineage. In fact, it is far less expensive compared to any of them. Nevertheless, it is much quicker too.

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2020 Ferrari F8 Tributo

2020 Ferrari F8 Tributo

Ferrari’s replacement for the 488 GTB features the high-revving V-8 from the Pista

The 2020 Ferrari F8 Tributo is an entry-level supercar that the Maranello-based company launched in 2019. The F8 Tributo replaced the 488 GTB, introduced in 2015, but it’s essentially a mid-cycle upgrade and not a brand-new car. The supercar replaces the 488 GTB in the same way that the 812 Superfast and GTC4Lusso replaced the F12berlinetta and FF, respectively, with the facelift accompanied by a nameplate change.

The upgrade is rather significant as far as design goes. Not only sporting new features front and rear, but the F8 Tributo also boasts more aggressive aerodynamics, which are based on the track-ready 488 Pista. The F8 also shares underpinnings with the Pista and generates the same 710 horsepower. The F8 Tributo arrives just in time for the facelifted Lamborghini Huracan Evo and the relatively new McLaren 720S. Let’s find out how they compare.

Updated 03/08/2018: We update this review with a series of new images taken during the 2019 Geneva Motor Show.

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2019 Ferrari P80/C

2019 Ferrari P80/C

Based on the 488 GT3, it’s the most extreme 488 design to date

The Ferrari P80/C is a one-off supercar built by the company’s special projects unit. Designed by the same team that created the SP12 EPC, F12 TRS, J50, and the Monza SP1 and SP2 twins, the P80/C is based on the race-spec Ferrari 488 GT3. The supercar also draws cues from the iconic 330 P3/P4 the 1966 Dino 206S, as requested by its customer.

In development since 2015, the P80/C had the longest development time of any Ferrari one-off made to date. Ferrari says it spent almost four years on in-depth styling research and engineering development, with "meticulous analysis of performance parameters as well as scrupulous aerodynamic testing, all with a different approach than taken by Ferrari with its one-off cars in the past." Based on the way this car looks, I’m tempted to believe Ferrari isn’t just pulling PR tricks on us. Let’s have a closer look at the supercar we may never get to see in the metal anytime soon.

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2018 Ferrari SP3JC

2018 Ferrari SP3JC

Maranello’s latest-one creation was ordered by a former freelance writer

Following a long line of one-off creations, Ferrari has built another one-make masterpiece, called the SP3JC. Based on the Ferrari F12tdf, the SP3JC is effectively the F12 Spider we never had. It has no roof (obviously), and it wears a funky tri-color paint scheme that really doesn’t do justice to the exclusivity of this model. Scottish collector John Collins owns this model after commissioning Ferrari to build it more than three years ago. The wait was long, but the final product made it worth it.

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1995 Ferrari F512 M

1995 Ferrari F512 M

The final hurrah of the Ferrari Testarossa

The Ferrari F512 M was the last evolution of the Testarossa, unarguably one of the legendary cars of the ‘80s. The F512 M was lighter than its predecessor, featured more modern styling, and boasted improved handling characteristics.

Everyone knows the Testarossa. With its red cam covers, its long “cheese graters” on the sides, and angular design, it’s a staple of its time and one of Ferrari’s modern icons. At the time, it was every bit as fast as a Countach, if not slightly faster. It handled slightly better and, more importantly, was a more relaxed tourer in that you could actually drive the Testarossa for 500 miles at a time and not drop dead from back pain afterward.

The F512 TR continued the trend and refined the recipe, but the ultimate expression of this body shape came in 1994 and was christened F512 M, where M stands for “Modificato.” Indeed, there were many modifications done to the F512 M even in comparison to the F512 TR, but the same spirit was still there. It was to be the rarest of all the Testarossas since only 501 were built through 1996 when Ferrari rolled out the front-engined grand tourer called 550 Maranello.

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2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo

2018 Ferrari FXX-K Evo

The ultimate LaFerrari!

When a high-profile carmaker such as Ferrari launches a great supercar like the LaFerrari, it’s difficult to imagine a way to significantly improve the design. But the team from Maranello has already done it twice. First, Ferrari launched the FXX-K, a track-only LaFerrari with enhanced aerodynamics. This happened back in 2015. Two years have passed, and the Prancing Horse found a way to make the FXX-K even more brutal. It’s called the FXX-K Evo, and it has more downforce than any Ferrari to date!

Launched at the 2017 Finali Mondiale of the Ferrari Challenge, the FXX-K Evo takes the familiar FXX-K to a new level in the same way that the

Enzo

based FXX Evoluzione was a heavily upgraded FXX. Just like the FXX-K, the Evo is not homologated for road use, and production will be limited to only a few models. However, the Evo is also available as an upgrade to the standard FXX-K. The package includes many add-ons, starting with an aerodynamic kit built upon know-how obtained from the many racing series Ferrari competes in, including Formula One, GT3, GTE, and Challenge. It’s also lighter due to increased use of carbon-fiber and despite having a much larger rear wing. Yes, the FXX-K is a monster of a LaFerrari so keep reading my full review to find out more.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari FXX-K Evo.

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2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta #210

2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta #210

Could this be the hypercar that sells for $10 million?

The last Ferrari Laferrari Aperta is headed to the auction block this weekend. That alone should be enough to warrant headlines, but as most of you already know, the auction-bound LaFerrari Aperta is special in its own right. This unit isn’t supposed to exist in the first place. This is the 210th LaFerrari Aperta, a last-second creation by Maranello that isn’t a part of the initial lot of 209 units that the automaker planned to launch but was nonetheless built as an auction piece to benefit the “Save the Children” charity.

The auction is set to take place at Ferrari’s Fiorano track and is part of RM Sotheby’s “Legend e Passione” event being held as part of the Italian automaker’s 50th anniversary. Befitting the event on September 9, Ferrari gave the LaFerrari Aperta a unique look no other model of its kind had when they all came out of production. These features firmly establish the 210th model as a legitimate one-of-a-kind LaFerrari Aperta, the kind of car that Ferrari collectors will trip over themselves to get a hold of. It’s no surprise then that neither Ferrari nor RM Sotheby’s has released an estimate for the car. Considering that the 500th LaFerrari – the precursor of the 210th LaFerrari Aperta – fetched $7 million in a similar auction setting last year, the sky really is the limit as to how much the 210th LaFerrari Aperta is going to sell for this weekend.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2015 Ferrari Sergio

2015 Ferrari Sergio

If there was ever a concept that truly embodied the long-standing partnership between Ferrari and Pininfarina, it would be the 2013 Ferrari Sergio. The concept burst onto the scene at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show as a tribute model to the late Sergio Pininfarina. Reports that the Sergio was earmarked for production first surfaced in September 2014, and a little over a month later, a new report indicated that Ferrari and Pininfarina were actually building production models of the radical concept. Now, the wait is over, as it was recently officially announced that the first Ferrari Sergio has been delivered to the SBH Royal Auto Gallery at Abu Dhabi’s Yas Marina Circuit in the United Arab Emirates.

Ferrari and Pininfarina, the two architects behind the Sergio Concept, built six production versions of the radical supercar, each coming with a price tag of $3 million. The price is admittedly way more than I can afford, but for the six individuals Ferrari invited to snatch up the limited-edition piece, spending $3 million on an ultra-exclusive supercar can be considered money well spent.

Unfortunately, all six models have already been spoken for. Based on the Ferrari 458 Spider, the roadster was "created to celebrate the spirit and core values of the historic Cambiano company in the 60th anniversary year of its collaboration with the Prancing Horse," as stated in a press release.

The car is not only striking to look at, it’s also, unsurprisingly, intended to be extremely driver oriented, as is emphasized in the press release: "An authentic open-top, it explicitly references the track, underscoring and intensifying its sense of sportiness, fun behind the wheel and the pleasure of design at its purest."

Each of the six Ferrari Sergios was carefully customized by its owner at a workshop in Maranello, where a large variety of colors, materials, and finishes were on hand to suit their personal tastes. The result, clearly, is a car that’s fast, beautiful, and absolutely unique.

Updated 08/24/2017: We added a series of images taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Click past the jump to read more.

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2017 Ferrari F12tdf

2017 Ferrari F12tdf

Although the majority of Ferraris built over the last four decades have featured a mid-engine layout, there was a time when all of Maranello’s products were front-engined. Until the mid-1960s, Enzo Ferrari felt that a mid-engine Ferrari would be unsafe in the hands of customers. That changed in 1966, when Enzo, having seen the stir Lamborghini created with the 1966-1974 Lamborghini Miura, approved the V-6-powered 1967-1980 Ferrari Dino for production. Although mid-engined supercars became increasingly popular through the 1970s, Ferrari continued to build front-engined cars into the 21st century, with the current lineup including the 2013 Ferrari F12berlinetta, 2012 Ferrari FF, and 2015 Ferrari California T.

The F12berlinetta, a full-fledged grand tourer, harkens back to the 1968-1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 "Daytona" of the late 1960s, and in many way to the iconic 1964-1966 Ferrari 275 GTB and 1962-1964 Ferrari 250 GTO. Much like its predecessors, it spawned various one-off and special-edition models, including the 2014 Ferrari F12 TRS, 2015 Ferrari SP America, 2015 Ferrari F60 America, and the 2015 Carrozzeria Touring Berlinetta Lusso. Now, Ferrari injected more power into the F12berlinetta to create the F12tdf, a tribute to the legendary Tour de France automobile race, an event Maranello dominated from 1956 through 1964.

Originally rumored to wear a "Speciale" badge, the F12tdf is more than just a tribute car with added grunt. The F12berlinetta shell has been redesigned for improved downforce and weight has been reduce by means of extensive carbon-fiber and aluminum use. Additionally, the Italians used new state-of-the-art tech to make the F12tdf one of the quickest Ferraris out there. Find out more below.

Updated 08/17/2017: We added a series on new images and a video taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ferrari F12tdf.

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2021 Ferrari LaFerrari Successor

2021 Ferrari LaFerrari Successor

Say hello to Maranello’s very first all-electric monster machine

Blasphemy. That’s probably the first thought of any purist considering the creation of an all-electric Ferrari. Blasphemy and sacrilege. FCA head Sergio Marchionne would agree. In 2016, at the Geneva International Auto Show, the CEO remarked that the idea of an all-electric Ferrari was “an almost obscene concept.” Later that year, at the Paris Auto Show, Ferrari’s Chief Technical Officer, Michael Leiters, echoed Marchionne’s sentiment, albeit in slightly softer terms. “We would not follow to develop a fully electric car,” Leiters said, adding, “We are convinced that it’s right to have a hybrid car because, for us, the sound is a very crucially important characteristic of a Ferrari, and our customers want to have this.” Fair enough. Thing is, even a flat-out rejection isn’t enough to stop a possible EV Ferrari. Let me explain.

First off, the sound. The howl of internal combustion is as important to the Ferrari brand as red paint, and we get that. This is a company lives and dies by its engines. The thing is Ferrari is already testing the waters – turbocharged models have been around for decades now, and electrification is integral to the performance of the “ultimate” LaFerrari hypercar. What’s more, Sergio Marchionne has already discussed the possibility of entering Formula E. Throw in continued EV development from competitors like Porsche and McLaren, and relevancy starts to become an issue. Finally, there’s that old Enzo Ferrari quote: “Aerodynamics are for people who can’t build engines.” The point is this – never say never.

Continue reading to learn more about the all-electric Ferrari LaFerrari Successor.

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2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast

2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast

The F12berlinetta gets a much needed facelift for 2018

Introduced in 2012 as a replacement for the Ferrari 599, the F12berlinetta harkens back to the 365 GTB/4 "Daytona" and, in many ways, to the iconic 250 GTO and 275 GTB. A full-fledged grand tourer powered by a no-nonsense, naturally aspirated V-12, the F12berlinetta has already spawned many one-off and special-edition models, including the F12 TRS, SP America, F60 America, Carrozzeria Touring Berlinetta Lusso, and more recently the F12tdf. After some five years on the market, the F12 received its mid-cycle facelift ahead of the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. It goes by the name 812 Superfast and comes with many improvements.

Just like the transition from the FF to the GTC4Lusso, the F12berlinetta gained a significant update and a name change. Ferrari didn’t care to explain the meaning behind the new name, but it’s safe to assume that the "812" comes from the engine’s output in PS plus the number of cylinders, while Superfast is just... well... an attempt to be cool in the 21st century. This isn’t the first time a Ferrari appears to have been named by the company’s social media department, as the LaFerrari is just as flamboyant. But it’s worth mentioning that the 812 isn’t the first Superfast in the company’s lineup. The name dates back to 1964, when Ferrari offered the 500 Superfast as the top-of-the-line version of the America model.

Moving over to more important things, Ferrari gave the F12berlinetta a thorough restyling. The grand tourer sports numerous modifications front and rear, while the interior has updated tech, a few nips and tucks, and new seats. More importantly, the 6.3-liter V-12 was redesigned into a new mill that makes the 812 Superfast the quickest and most powerful production Ferrari ever built.

Continue reading to learn more about the new Ferrari F12M.

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2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta

2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta

Maranello’s quickest supercar yet loses its roof

The Ferrari LaFerrari made its first public appearance at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show, taking center stage in spite of massive competition from the McLaren P1 and the Lamborghini Veneno. Not only the fastest road-legal supercar to come out of Maranello, the LaFerrari is also the first Ferrari to carry a hybrid powertrain. Developed as a successor to the almighty Enzo and the F50, the LaFerrari is the first Ferrari not to be designed by Pininfarina since 1973.

Built in just 499 units and priced from $1.7 million, the LaFerrari became an instant hit with deep-pocketed enthusiasts, who rushed to pay the hefty sticker and help Ferrari close order books in a matter of months. Although both the standard supercar and the highly exclusive, track-only FXX K are already sold out, the LeFerrari saga continues in 2017 with a convertible version.

Rumors about a LaFerrari convertible have been flying around since 2014, when we rendered the model based on the coupe version. Come 2016 and Ferrari CEO Sergio Marchionne finally confirmed that a drop-top model is in the works. In July 2016, Maranello unleashed the first official photos of the Laferrari Aperta, while the Paris Motor Show hosted to supercar’s public debut.

Updated 11/11/2016: Ferrari dropped a very cool promo video for the LaFerrari Aperta with Formula 1 driver, Sebastian Vettel behind the wheel.

Continue reading to find out more about the LaFerrari Aperta.

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2016 Bengala F12 Caballería

2016 Bengala F12 Caballería

A menacing interpretation of Ferrari’s high-end supercar

This is a Ferrari F12berlinetta, or it used to be. Now it’s called the Bengalla F12 Caballería, and you can thank Spanish boutique shop Bengala Automotive for that. One look at it and you start to wonder if Ferrari opted for a more subtle design for the F12berlinetta. Either that or Bengalla just had its way with the supercar, giving it a GT3-inspired body with panels made completely out of carbon fiber.

In any case, the Caballería looks downright menacing, which I suppose is Bengala’s objective in the first place. After all, this is the same company that worked on a similar project for the Rolls-Royce Ghost with the help of Italian colleague Vitesse Audessus. That piece of work was an equally aggressive project that completely flipped the look of the the Rollers sedan, for better or worse. So in keeping with the precedent it set with the Ghost, Bengala gifted the F12berlinetta with new body panels that were inspired by Ferrari’s own GT3 racers. The result is nothing short of dramatic, although like the Ghost, beauty may still be in the eye of the beholder.

There are no interior or power upgrades to speak of, which kind of dampens the proceedings considering how aggressive the car looks. But all’s not lost because the weight savings Bengala achieved by installing those carbon fiber body panels should account for some noticeable improvements in the supercar’s performance times.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Bengala F12 Caballería.

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2014 Ferrari LaFerrari

2014 Ferrari LaFerrari

Launched as a successor to the Ferrari Enzo, the Ferrari LaFerrari was designed with a language that, according to the design team led by Flavio Manzoni, is the perfect combination of form and function. It combines

F1

inspired aerodynamics and plenty of sharp character lines to bring together one of the wildest production cars from Ferrari. On the inside, the LaFerrari got a newly-designed steering wheel that is more square than it is round, and an overall interior design that screams track-only but offers plenty of comfort two. The biggest news is what makes this red rocket go. The new LaFerrari is the first car from the brand to use a hybrid drive system. Known as the HY-KERS system, it has a 6.3-liter V-12 and two electric motors. Total output is 963 horsepower (800 from the ICE and 163 from the electric motors) and more than 663 pound-feet of torque. To help keep everything kosher on the road, the suspension system has been designed specifically for the car, and Brembo brakes are in place to bring this puppy to a stop.

Ferrari went above and beyond with the LaFerrari, with the exception of the name, but don’t even get me started on that one. Outside of the name, however, Ferrari is bringing a heavy hitter to a supercar market that is now going hybrid. It is slated to compete against models like the wild McLaren P1 and the Porsche 918 Spyder – both of which have plenty of hybrid DNA in their genes. So, what separates the goofy-named LaFerrari from the pack of hybrid heavy hitters? Check out our full review below and you’ll find out that and more.

Updated 08/22/2016: Ferrari brought a satin black 2014 LaFerrari at the 2016 Mecum Auctions sale during Monterey Car Week, where it was auction for the record price of $4.7 million. Check the picture gallery for a new set of images taken during the auction.

Hit the jump to rear more about the new LaFerrari.

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