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Budget Direct Renders the Evolution of 7 Timeless Models

Budget Direct Renders the Evolution of 7 Timeless Models

Don’t expect any of these models to go away anytime soon

There is no shortage of car models in the auto industry these days. Some models have gained followings while others have become flashes in the pan. Then there are the titans of the business, the models that have lasted the test of time and have been around, literally, for generations. In the course of their respective lifetimes, these models have evolved in more ways than one, none more evident than their designs. These seven models have been around for so long their designs have evolved considerably from when they first came out. Knowing their place in the business, these models are unlikely to go away anytime soon.

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1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1

1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1

A true American Classic

The 1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 was Ford Motor Company’s response to GM’s Chevrolet Camaro as the Pony Car war reached its peak. It was the meanest looking Mustang up to that point, humiliated the GT in sales to the point the latter got discontinued and could be optioned with the COPO-rivaling 7.0-liter Cobra Jet engine.

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The Ford Ranchero, America's Iconic Utility Coupe

The Ford Ranchero, America’s Iconic Utility Coupe

We take a closer look at Ford’s legendary car-based truck

Earlier this year, Ford announced that it will discontinue most of its cars in the U.S. to expand its crossover lineup. The company has already confirmed that it will revive the Bronco and that it will also offer a smaller, boxier SUV based on the Focus. Word has it that Ford is also planning to build a subcompact truck on the same underpinnings and it could be called the Ranchero.

If this happens, the iconic nameplate will return to the U.S. market after more than 40 years. There’s no official info as to when this will happen, but sources "familiar with Ford’s future product plan," as unveiled by Automobile Magazine in July 2018, said the truck could arrive as early as 2022, and that it could be produced in Mexico.

With the Ranchero likely to make a comeback soon, we decided to take a closer look at the iconic truck that was built between 1957 to 1979.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Video: Petrolicious Gets Up Close and Personal With a '66 Ford GT40

Video: Petrolicious Gets Up Close and Personal With a ’66 Ford GT40

A Blue Oval hero dressed in red and white

This year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans may have come and gone (congrats, Toyota!), but truth be told, we’re still feeling a but wistful for that epic and legendary endurance event. So when we came across this high-quality profile video on a 1966 Ford GT40, courtesy of our friends over at Petrolicious, we just knew we had to feature it.

In typical Petrolicious fashion, the video includes gorgeous shots of the car, both sitting and in motion, with a healthy dollop of informative and entertaining narration laid on top. All good stuff, but the car - man, this thing is a real treat. Not only is it a beautiful thing to behold, looking pretty much perfect from every angle, but the sound of the big block 427 V-8 doing its thing will send electricity up and down your spine.

Owner Ted Baird assembled his GT40 to be as faithful to the original as possible, implementing as many original parts as he could find to create something that was not only visually representative of the machines that took top honors at Le Mans, but mechanically representative as well. It’s not a replica - it’s an official GT40P Mk. II, just not one of the original vehicles.

All told, the car is stunning, and hearing Baird unleash it on the track will get you amped. “This is pure, on-hands, manual, throw-it-around race car.” Baird explains. “But, that’s part of the challenge. If you can race something like this, you should be able to race anything.”

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2018 Heavy Metal Model A

2018 Heavy Metal Model A

A hot rod turned up to 11

One of the most amazing things about car customization is that there are no rules about how it should be done or what you can and can’t do. And that means if you’ve got the skills and the imagination, you can turn any four-wheeled machine into a rolling piece of art, an expression of creativity capable of rivaling anything you might see hung in a museum or played on the radio. Such is the case with this hot rod Ford Model A, created by the talented folks on Velocity’s original series Speed Is The New Black for a rock star client.

Continue reading to learn more about the Heavy Metal Model A.

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1965 Ford F-250 Six-Pack – An ICON Reformer Project

1965 Ford F-250 Six-Pack – An ICON Reformer Project

This rare Ford gets a frame-off restoration and Cummins power

Imagine having a vintage crew cab pickup with all the style and flair from a bygone era in design mixed with modern mechanicals and creature comforts, all capped with a outright obsessive level of detail crafted from the finest materials available. That’s exactly what we’re seeing here. This 1965 Ford F-250 Six-Pack is the newest member of ICON’s Reformer series of builds. Its outward appearance looks properly vintage, but its body hides a 5.9-liter Cummins turbodiesel and Dodge 3500 underpinnings.

ICON has made its quite a name for itself over the years building custom vehicles based on vintage iron. The scope ranges from the “Derelict” series that puts modern mechanicals under an almost untouched, original body with its beautiful patina still intact to high-end Bronco and FJ restorations that are far superior to their factory-fresh condition. The California-based independent company will field nearly any customer request, regardless of difficulty, so far as their bank account will allow. That is clearly on display with this 1965 Ford pickup. You’ll definitely want to see the details in our full review.

Continue reading for more information.

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1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429

1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429

The Mustang is an Iconic muscle car, but one of the most important and well-respected variants of the Mustang was the 429 Boss. In the late 1960’s, Ford just didn’t have the power to compete with the 426 Hemi that Chrysler was using in NASCAR, so it had to do something to remain competitive. The answer was to build a new engine that could compete, and work began on the Boss 429. The engine would have never made it into production vehicles, but NASCAR’s homologation rules required a minimum of 500 cars be equipped with the engine and sold to the general public for it to be used.

At the time, Ford’s finances weren’t the best thanks to building the Boss 302 and its subsequent Trans Am variant for the SCCA Trans Am series. To make everything financially sound, Ford used the four-speed Cobra Jet Mustang as a template and commissioned Kar Kraft to make the necessary modifications, which were, in all honesty, quite extensive. The Boss 429 was produced for the 1969 and 1970 model years in a total of 1358 examples – 859 of which were built for ’69 and 499 for 1970. Furthermore, two of the 1969 models were actually Boss 429 Cougars.

Now that you know a little bit about the history of the Boss 429 Mustang let’s take a closer look at this 1969 model and talk a little more about the changes that went into making it possible and what – outside of the low production numbers — made the car so special.

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1962 Ford Falcon Squire Wagon

1962 Ford Falcon Squire Wagon

The compact car that changed America

Mostly known as Australia’s longest-running nameplate (set to be discontinued at the end of 2016), the Ford Falcon also had a North American sibling for a full decade. It was introduced in 1960, alongside the Australian model, but while its cousin from Down Under soldiered on for more than five decades, the U.S.-spec version was discontinued in 1970.

Although short-lived, the Falcon was an influential car and marked the beginning of a new era not just for Ford, but for the entire North American industry too. The compact was conceived in the late 1950s, when Ford realized that larger cars were becoming increasingly expensive and many American families were looking at smaller vehicles, usually imports, for a second car.

Penned under Ford’s then general manager Robert S. McNamara, the Falcon was developed with parts sourced from the company’s existing bin in order to keep costs as low as possible. FoMoCo also focused on reducing ownership costs. Furthermore, it developed several body styles in order to cover as many niches and customer requirements as possible. The lineup included two- and four-door sedans, three- and five-door wagons, and two-door coupe and convertible models.

The first-generation Falcon Squire Wagon, which we’ll be discussing below, arrived in 1962, two years after the Falcon’s initial launch. By that time, the compact had already become a hit, setting record sales with over 500,000 units sold in 1960 and over 1,000,000 examples sold by the end of 1961. The Falcon was redesigned for 1964, getting a more squared-off, more modern look.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ford Falcon Squire Wagon.

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1950 Ford F47 Pickup

1950 Ford F47 Pickup

A Canadian-spec F1 with a full restoration

It was the 1948 model year that Ford introduced its first F-Series pickup – the same truck line still sold in dealers today. The first-generation truck would last through the 1952 model year, with small changes happening along the way. This 1950 model carries all the trappings of an original F-Series, including a wood-floor bed, three-speed manual transmission, and the iconic 226 cubic-inch flathead V-8. It’s headed under the gavel at Mecum’s upcoming 2016 Monterey Auction in California.

Interestingly enough, this isn’t a typical Ford F1 pickup, though it’s completely stock. It’s actually a Canadian-spec model built in a Canadian factory, one of 16 F-Series factories back in the late 1940s. What’s more, Ford’s Canadian branch used a different nomenclature for the pickups back then. This would-be F1 is actually a F47.

This particular pickup underwent a full, frame-off restoration in 2015. Every nut, bolt, and wooden slat was restored or replaced to factory specifications. A truck of this age in this condition is rare, so the estimated auction price reflects the condition. Mecum suspects the truck will sell between $55,000 and $65,000. For the full, in-dept review, click “continue reading” below.

Keep reading for more information.

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1963 Ford Cortina "Green Goddess"

1963 Ford Cortina "Green Goddess"

The most original first-gen Cortina you’ll ever find anywhere

Originally revealed in October of 1962, just a couple weeks away from the London Motor Show, Ford brought the Cortina to the masses as an affordable, cheap-to-produce, and cheap-to-run compact. Ford produced the Cortina for two decades, between 1962 and 1982, putting out five generations in that timespan. Thanks to its easily accessible pricing and promotion in films like Carry on Cabby, the Cortina was immensely popular, becoming England’s best-selling car in the ‘70s. The first generation alone sold over a million units, and the Cortina still enjoys a widespread enthusiast movement in the U.K. Now, there’s an outrageously well-maintained first-gen Cortina going up for auction, and it’s got less than 20,000 miles on the odometer, original everything, and looks like it just rolled out from the factory this morning.

This green old-school four-door comes in the top-spec 1500 GT trim from the 1963 model year, and it’s going under the hammer at the Historics at Brooklands classic car auction, near Weybridge, England, later next month. On average, the “Green Goddess” has traveled just a mile a day in the 53 years it’s been on the road, and should tempt any collector looking to get his hands on a British Ford classic.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ford Cortina “Green Goddess.”

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Petrolicious Focuses German Collector Who Likes His Ford Collection "Nice and Simple:" Video

Petrolicious Focuses German Collector Who Likes His Ford Collection "Nice and Simple:" Video

Thorstein Seitz is not a traditional auto collector, and that’s what makes him special

Most auto collectors I’m familiar with are in the game because they either love classic cars, expensive cars, fast and powerful cars, or a combination of all three. But for Thorsten Seitz, he doesn’t care about any of those things. He doesn’t care about mud flaps, chrome trims, or emblems. All he’s after is a simple car collection, which is exactly what he has with garage full of vintage Fords. And by vintage Fords, I mean Ford Escorts, Cortinas, and Taunuses.

It’s not exactly an inspiring collection in the traditional sense, but in a round-a-bout way, it’s exactly why Thorstein Seitz is a unique car collector and is a fitting subject for the latest episode of Petrolicious. In his own words, he says that he likes to keep his collection “very simple” and prefers “base models” over their trimmed out counterparts.

Overly sporty? No thanks. Exaggerated fenders? Yuck. Aluminum bars? Hideous.

That’s how Seitz views his taste for cars and it partly explains why his collection of cars, despite their ages, are almost near stock, free from any performance modifications. He also says that he drives like a “retiree,” even though he has treated himself to an occasional burst or two.

But for the most part, Thorstein Seitz is the antithesis of what people would expect from an auto collector. Make no mistake though, that quality in him is not a negative one. On the contrary, it’s precisely why he’s such a unique collector. He understands that his taste in cars is not everyone’s and he’s perfectly fine with that.

And in the same token, that attitude is why this German collector of vintage American cars is someone to be admired. He’s the living embodiment of the phrase “a man’s collection, whatever it may be, is only as valuable as his desire and passion for it.”

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Edsel Ford's 1915 Cross-Country Road Trip Revisited

Edsel Ford’s 1915 Cross-Country Road Trip Revisited

One hundred years ago, getting from sea to shining sea was far more difficult than it is today, but it’s estimated that some 25,000 cars made the trek for the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition world’s fair in San Francisco, CA. Among these cars was a 1915 Ford Model T driven by 21-year-old Edsel Ford, and to commemorate this spectacular automotive accomplishment, the Historical Vehicle Association (HVA) recently set off on the Road Trip Century Celebration by recreating Edsel’s journey from Ford’s world headquarters in Dearborn, MI to San Francisco.

The trip kicked off on July 17 and will follow Edsel’s route as closely as possible, traveling as many as 264 miles in one day with a 2015 Ford Mustang EcoBoost Convertible tagging along with the Model T as a support vehicle. The route cuts through Michigan, Indiana, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona before stopping a week in the Monterey, CA area for the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Putting a cap on the long-distance road trip, HVA will wrap it up on August 19 at the original site of the 1915 world’s fair.

To see if the epic road trip is passing through a city near you, be sure to check out the website for a full schedule of all the planned stops. For everyone else, the group will be posting pictures of its journey on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Jay Leno Drives a 1937 Ford Woodie: Video

Jay Leno Drives a 1937 Ford Woodie: Video

The woodie car, essentially a vehicle with rear bodywork constructed of wood framework with infill wood panels, was born in the early 1900s. Initially used for trucks and other hauling vehicles, wood eventually became popular on other types of cars as well, ranging from anything from convertibles to wagons. Detroit built both entry-level and luxury cars equipped with wooden bodywork for half a century, although the number of nameplates sold as woodies diminished significantly until their complete extinction in the 1980s.

Although woodie cars were extremely popular in the 1930s, they weren’t exactly pleasant to drive. Most of them were big and heavy, and maintaining the wood bodywork that made them special back in the day was a nightmare. Exposing them to weather had disastrous results because these cars don’t react nicely when hit by direct sunlight or humidity. The wood swells and/or shrinks before it eventually cracks, leaving its driver with a car that’s unsafe to drive. Not that they were safe to drive when brand-new since those wooden doors were way too thin to protect the car’s occupants in any way.

Still, woodies are an important part of the American automotive history and a culture a lot of enthusiasts still cherish. Maintaining and restoring these vehicles is a lot more difficult when compared to metal-bodied cars, which led to the establishment of several specialty shops for woodies. One of them is Hot Rods & Hobbies, which brought a couple of 1937 Fords to Jay Leno’s Garage. Both vehicles are light restomods, which basically means they appear stock except for the slightly lowered suspension, but feature modern underpinning and beefed-up engines. One of them, for instance, is powered by a Roush, 5.8-liter, V-8 powerplant, which definitely eliminated the laziness of Ford’s 1937 Woodie (these heavy cars had 60- and 85-horsepower V-8s back in the day).

Whether you like woodies or not, this is a video you definitely need to watch. Not so much for the cars, but for the extraordinary insight provided by Hot Rods & Hobbies’ Scott Bonowski on restoring woodie cars. Check it out by clicking the play button above.

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Video: 1967 Shelby GT500 Vs. 2010 Shelby GT500 Patriot Edition

Video: 1967 Shelby GT500 Vs. 2010 Shelby GT500 Patriot Edition

If you’re not familiar with Motor Trend’s "Generation Gap", it’s a show in which two representatives of the same nameplate, but from different generations are compared in regards to their looks, performance and collectability. The show is also interactive, with the viewers getting to decide which of the two vehicles is cooler.

Last time it happened, enthusiasts determined that the 1969 Pontiac GTO Judge was way more appealing than the 2006 GTO prototype. In the latest episode of "Generation Gap," Motor Trend turned to the Shelby GT500 for its new contestants, bringing together the original 1967 GT500 and the 2010 GT500 Patriot Edition. These two cars share a name, but thanks to their 33-year age gap, they share little else.

The 1967 Mustang follows the "no replacement for displacement" adage with its naturally aspirated, 7.0-liter, V-8 making 355 horsepower. The Patriot Edition boasts a 5.4-liter V-8 with a supercharger on top that sends 540 ponies to the rear wheels. The 2010 GT500 is definitely the quickest of the two, needing only 4.3 seconds to run from 0 to 60 mph before reaching a top speed of 179 mph. The 1967 model, on the other hand, takes 6.2 seconds to charge from naught to 60 mph and hits a top speed of 132 mph. On paper, the 2010 Patriot Edition wins. But who will take the grand prize once looks and collector value are brought into the equation?

Just hit the play button to watch the episode and find out for yourselves. And don’t forget to share your opinion in the comments below.

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Video: Jay Leno Takes a 1932 Ford Highboy Roadster for a Spin

Video: Jay Leno Takes a 1932 Ford Highboy Roadster for a Spin

Jay’s latest adventure takes a deep dive into hot-rodding history with this beautiful 1932 Ford Highboy roadster. But don’t pass this off as just another deuce coupe. No, this car is the deuce coupe. Jay has with him Bruce Meyer, the car’s restorer and current owner, who tells of a storied past barely imaginable.

The story began in the late 1940s as U.S. soldiers were returning home from the war. At that time, Bob McGee was a student at the University of Southern California and had customized the 1932 Ford in ways never done before. He had notched the frame in order to lower the car, added a custom three-piece hood, V-notched the spreader bar, removed the fenders, shaved the radiator cap and door handles, reworked the car’s interior, and added a 21-stud, Flathead V-8 from a 1934 Ford.

The car then gains even more notoriety when Bob Petersen, the owner of Hot Rod Magazine and Petersen Publishing, shot a picture of McGee in his deuce coupe cruising along the USC campus for the cover of Hot Rod Magazine. As it turns out, McGee’s roadster was one of the first hot rods to grace the magazine’s cover.

McGee eventually had to sell his beloved roadster and the car underwent many other modifications over the years by the hands of several owners. That’s when Bruce Meyer got a hold of it. He painstakingly restored the car back to its original glory, even employing the direction of McGee in his older age.

Now we get to enjoy this piece of history as Jay and Bruce drive the 1932 Ford down its native streets of Southern California. This, my friends, is the definition of hot-rodding.

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1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33

1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33

While Ferrari needs no introduction, Brabham is a name some of you might not remember so well. Founded by Jack Brabham, who died earlier this year aged 88, and Ron Tauranac, Brabham spend three decades in Formula One, in which it won four drivers’ championships and two constructors’ titles. Its first successful campaigns, and the only ones to bring both the drivers’ and constructors’ championship, came in 1966 and 1967. Although it won two more drivers’ titles, Brabham failed to win the constructors’ championship for the third time. However, the Brits came close on many occasions. 1970 was an important year for Brabham. Although it only managed fourth position at the end of the season, the team lost its number one driver, Jack Brabham. The man that drove the race cars built by his own hands retired from racing following the Mexican Grand Prix. The 1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33 was the last F1 car he had driven during an official event, making it that much more important to the company, second to only the Repco-powered single-seaters that brought the 1966 and 1967 championships.

In this car, Brabham won one race and scored three more podiums, while teammate Rolf Stommelen added a further third-place finish. Brabham, one of eight teams to use Ford’s DFV engine that year, ended the season behind Lotus, Ferrari and March, but ahead of McLaren, BRM and Matra. What made the BT33 such a competitive racer? Read on to find out.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33.

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1968 Ford Shelby Mustang GT500

1968 Ford Shelby Mustang GT500

With Ford celebrating the Mustang’s 50th anniversary this year, it seems only appropriate to take a gander at a vintage model that enjoys both an iconic status and a resale value that’s far and above its original MSRP back in 1968.

While the Mustang was available with several engine options, the one to lust after was the 428-cubic-inch, Police Interceptor V-8 found in the GT500. It spat out roughly 420 horsepower and nearly 450 pound-feet of torque. Mated to a three-speed automatic, the GT500 could lay down 0-to-60-mph times around six seconds on its way to a quarter mile in just over 14 seconds — pretty respectable numbers for that era.

All that extra grunt came courtesy of the legendary Mustang man, Carol Shelby and his affiliation with Ford Motor Company. The extra tuning and Shelby’s name makes examples of his work very valuable these days. As of this writing, the particular example seen above is up for sale at RK Motors for a cool $149,900. With all the right paperwork and certified documentation, this car is the real deal.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1968 Ford Shelby Mustang GT500.

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1967 Ford Shelby Mustang GT350

1967 Ford Shelby Mustang GT350

The 1967 Ford Shelby Mustang GT350 is a classic, red-blooded, American muscle car. While the Mustang line was only three years old in 1967, this didn’t stop the legendary Carroll Shelby from injecting a healthy dose of his ingenuity into the redesigned, 1967 model. These Shelby Mustangs included powerful engines, race-bred transmissions, and strong rear differentials to create the ultimate drag racers. Impressive acceleration, great looks, amazing street presence, and glorious V-8 sounds were all standard equipment.

Sure, this muscular pony may not be as insanely powerful as some of the cars of today, but remember that this thing is all motor. There are no electronic gadgets and gizmos or crazy forced-induction systems padding its numbers. It truly is a fine example of classic mechanical engineering at its finest.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1967 Ford Shelby Mustang GT350.

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1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 KR

1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 KR

By 1968, the Ford Mustang had already become one of the most popular cars in the United States. Affordable, available in three different body styles and with a bevy of inline-six and V-8 engines, Ford’s pony was enjoying tremendous success. The arrival of the beefed-up Shelby Mustang and its many versions only made things better, but Ford and Carroll Shelby felt the pony could become even more impressive. Their dream came true in April 1968, when a brand-new version of the 428 Police Interceptor engine was fitted with improved-breathing heads and larger exhaust manifolds, giving birth to the 428 Cobra Jet. The mill quickly found its way into the Shelby GT500, which became the GT500 KR or "King of the Road". Officially rated at 335 horsepower, but actually powered by no less than 400 ponies and 440 pound-feet of torque, the King gained iconic status almost immediately.

The moniker was discontinued for the 1969 model year, only a few months before Carroll Shelby terminated his agreement with Ford. The GT500 KR nameplate returned exactly 40 years later on the fifth-generation Mustang, this time adorning a 540-horsepower muscle car that was motivated by a 5.4-liter V-8. After all of these years, the first-generation GT500 KR is as formidable as it’s always been, but its statute and value have grown considerably in the eyes of muscle-car aficionados and collectors alike.

Updated 07/23/2014: A very rare Mustang GT 500 KR is being offered by RK Motors Charlotte for a price of $189,900. Click past the jump for more details.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1968 Shelby GT500 KR

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Atomic Hot Rods Releases New Promo Video

Atomic Hot Rods Releases New Promo Video

Something that is really incredible about the Olympic Games is how enthralling it can be to hear the winning athletes talk about their sport. Even if the sport is something the viewer has never done or even seen, hearing an expert break it down can really bring it to life.

That is the mood from Brian Darwas in the latest promo for his mastercraft custom car shop, Atomic Hot Rods. He walks us through his vision for the hot rod’s final state: authentic and real are the goals, so much that a bystander cannot tell if the car was made into a hot rod in 2002 or 1952.

There’s a real art to his craft and a beauty to bringing dead cars back to the roads. The best part of this expert promo video? The car (or one quite similar) featured within is for sale. A one-of-a-kind 1932 Ford Roadster with an all-steel Brookville Body is currently on the market from Atomtic Hot Rods.

Click past the jump to watch the promo video, featuring Brian Darwas and Atomic Hot Rods.

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