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Cool Truck for Sale: 1956 Ford F-100 With a Shelby GT350 Voodoo Engine

Cool Truck for Sale: 1956 Ford F-100 With a Shelby GT350 Voodoo Engine

This truck is rebuilt in and out, and looks like a brilliant package overall!

Believe it or not, this is actually a Ford F-Series pickup truck. Although it is far from the conventional trucks that we’re used to seeing now, this wacky design was quite common back in the day. There aren’t many examples of this old-school truck available online today, but one example has somehow arrived on the Barrett-Jackson website.

However, this particular model is highly customized and comes packed with a modern Mustang V-8 Voodoo engine under the hood. And, the best part – it is mated to a manual transmission! Is this the best package or what?

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The New Ford v. Ferrari Movie, The History Behind It, and Why That GT40 On the IMAX Poster is Inaccurate

The New Ford v. Ferrari Movie, The History Behind It, and Why That GT40 On the IMAX Poster is Inaccurate

The original GT40 was a complete mess...

"This is David vs. Goliath vs. Goliath," said leading actor Christian Bale that plays veteran sports car racing ace Ken Miles in the upcoming ’Ford v. Ferrari’ movie that’ll park in a cinema near you from November 15. It’s a story about racing as much as it is a story about business affairs that become personal and about what you can achieve if you’re willing to throw infinite amounts of cash at a problem. It’s the story about Ford’s first outright success in the 24 Hours of Le Mans that ended a six-year winning spree for Scuderia Ferrari.

’Ford v. Ferrari’ (or ’Le Mans ’66’ in Europe and other places) is the first movie to take us back to Le Mans since 2003’s Michel Vaillant. Those scenic country roads in France that play host to the most famous sports car endurance race in the world over a weekend in June were first showcased to moviegoers almost 50 years ago when Steve McQueen put his fortune and reputation on the line to create ’Le Mans’. ’Ford v. Ferrari’ looks at the 1966 edition of the race but you can’t tell that by looking at the recently released IMAX poster. So, why are Bale and co-star Matt Damon seen propped up against a weird-looking Ford GT40?

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1968 Ford Mustang Bullitt

1968 Ford Mustang Bullitt

The star of arguably the most famous car chase in movie history

When you think about famous car chases in movies, the classic footage of a dark green Mustang jumping up and down San Francisco’s hills in pursuit of a stoic, black Dodge Charger will most certainly roll in your memory. One of the two Mustangs used by the late Steve McQueen in that movie, ’Bullitt,’ has been found and it looks just as cool now as it did back in 1968.

Movie cars have always had a special aura surrounding them. Think about the DeLorean DMC-12 used in the ’Back To The Future’ trilogy. For all intents and purposes, John Z. DeLorean’s attempt at a supercar was laughable, although it did look the part. But, once it shone on the silver screen as a time-traveling machine, its place in history was forever assured. Same goes for the Dodge Monaco used by the Blues Brothers or Herbie, the cute Volkswagen Beetle that appeared in ’The Love Bug.’ Same goes for the Ford Mustang GT Fastback that was used by Steve McQueen’s character, Lt. Frank Bullitt, in the movie of the same name.

However, the Highland Green 2-door Fastback has become a cult classic also, in part, due to the mystique that shrouded it. There were, actually, two cars used during filming: one for all the action shots and one that was driven by McQueen during the more serene moments o the film. That car, chassis #8R02S125559, was thought to have been lost after McQueen failed to buy it in the late ’70s. Happily, now, both cars have been relocated, so the story does have a happy ending.

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1957 Ford Thunderbird E-Code

1957 Ford Thunderbird E-Code

Ford’s prettier answer to the Corvette

The Thunderbird lived its last days as a two-seater sports car in 1957 which is when Ford introduced the 312 5.1-liter V-8 engine. That’s how the E-Code Thunderbird was born, the beefiest of them all and the closest alternative to the Corvette that Ford ever offered.

Ford debuted the Thunderbird at the Detroit Auto Show in February of 1954 and quickly dubbed it "personal car" so as to suggest it wasn’t a direct answer to GM’s Corvette. What it was, in all fairness, was a luxury sports car tailor-made for the kind of people that were looking for a more refined 2-seater model than the Corvette.

The 1957 Thunderbird was the last which retained the original two-passenger layout before Ford decided that their clientele would much rather go for a 4-seater sports car with added amenities and weight. So, for 1957, Ford made the most powerful T-Bird ever by introducing the 5.1-liter V-8 engine, in a number of guises. The twin quad-barrel carburetor ones were distinguishable by the letter E in the car’s VIN code - the source of the ’E-Bird’ nickname.

Keep reading to learn more about the 1957 Ford Thunderbird E-Code

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Budget Direct Renders the Evolution of 7 Timeless Models

Budget Direct Renders the Evolution of 7 Timeless Models

Don’t expect any of these models to go away anytime soon

There is no shortage of car models in the auto industry these days. Some models have gained followings while others have become flashes in the pan. Then there are the titans of the business, the models that have lasted the test of time and have been around, literally, for generations. In the course of their respective lifetimes, these models have evolved in more ways than one, none more evident than their designs. These seven models have been around for so long their designs have evolved considerably from when they first came out. Knowing their place in the business, these models are unlikely to go away anytime soon.

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1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1

1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1

A true American Classic

The 1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 was Ford Motor Company’s response to GM’s Chevrolet Camaro as the Pony Car war reached its peak. It was the meanest looking Mustang up to that point, humiliated the GT in sales to the point the latter got discontinued and could be optioned with the COPO-rivaling 7.0-liter Cobra Jet engine.

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The Ford Ranchero, America's Iconic Utility Coupe

The Ford Ranchero, America’s Iconic Utility Coupe

We take a closer look at Ford’s legendary car-based truck

Earlier this year, Ford announced that it will discontinue most of its cars in the U.S. to expand its crossover lineup. The company has already confirmed that it will revive the Bronco and that it will also offer a smaller, boxier SUV based on the Focus. Word has it that Ford is also planning to build a subcompact truck on the same underpinnings and it could be called the Ranchero.

If this happens, the iconic nameplate will return to the U.S. market after more than 40 years. There’s no official info as to when this will happen, but sources "familiar with Ford’s future product plan," as unveiled by Automobile Magazine in July 2018, said the truck could arrive as early as 2022, and that it could be produced in Mexico.

With the Ranchero likely to make a comeback soon, we decided to take a closer look at the iconic truck that was built between 1957 to 1979.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Video: Petrolicious Gets Up Close and Personal With a '66 Ford GT40

Video: Petrolicious Gets Up Close and Personal With a ’66 Ford GT40

A Blue Oval hero dressed in red and white

This year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans may have come and gone (congrats, Toyota!), but truth be told, we’re still feeling a but wistful for that epic and legendary endurance event. So when we came across this high-quality profile video on a 1966 Ford GT40, courtesy of our friends over at Petrolicious, we just knew we had to feature it.

In typical Petrolicious fashion, the video includes gorgeous shots of the car, both sitting and in motion, with a healthy dollop of informative and entertaining narration laid on top. All good stuff, but the car - man, this thing is a real treat. Not only is it a beautiful thing to behold, looking pretty much perfect from every angle, but the sound of the big block 427 V-8 doing its thing will send electricity up and down your spine.

Owner Ted Baird assembled his GT40 to be as faithful to the original as possible, implementing as many original parts as he could find to create something that was not only visually representative of the machines that took top honors at Le Mans, but mechanically representative as well. It’s not a replica - it’s an official GT40P Mk. II, just not one of the original vehicles.

All told, the car is stunning, and hearing Baird unleash it on the track will get you amped. “This is pure, on-hands, manual, throw-it-around race car.” Baird explains. “But, that’s part of the challenge. If you can race something like this, you should be able to race anything.”

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2018 Heavy Metal Model A

2018 Heavy Metal Model A

A hot rod turned up to 11

One of the most amazing things about car customization is that there are no rules about how it should be done or what you can and can’t do. And that means if you’ve got the skills and the imagination, you can turn any four-wheeled machine into a rolling piece of art, an expression of creativity capable of rivaling anything you might see hung in a museum or played on the radio. Such is the case with this hot rod Ford Model A, created by the talented folks on Velocity’s original series Speed Is The New Black for a rock star client.

Continue reading to learn more about the Heavy Metal Model A.

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1965 Ford F-250 Six-Pack – An ICON Reformer Project

1965 Ford F-250 Six-Pack – An ICON Reformer Project

This rare Ford gets a frame-off restoration and Cummins power

Imagine having a vintage crew cab pickup with all the style and flair from a bygone era in design mixed with modern mechanicals and creature comforts, all capped with a outright obsessive level of detail crafted from the finest materials available. That’s exactly what we’re seeing here. This 1965 Ford F-250 Six-Pack is the newest member of ICON’s Reformer series of builds. Its outward appearance looks properly vintage, but its body hides a 5.9-liter Cummins turbodiesel and Dodge 3500 underpinnings.

ICON has made its quite a name for itself over the years building custom vehicles based on vintage iron. The scope ranges from the “Derelict” series that puts modern mechanicals under an almost untouched, original body with its beautiful patina still intact to high-end Bronco and FJ restorations that are far superior to their factory-fresh condition. The California-based independent company will field nearly any customer request, regardless of difficulty, so far as their bank account will allow. That is clearly on display with this 1965 Ford pickup. You’ll definitely want to see the details in our full review.

Continue reading for more information.

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1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429

1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429

The Mustang is an Iconic muscle car, but one of the most important and well-respected variants of the Mustang was the 429 Boss. In the late 1960’s, Ford just didn’t have the power to compete with the 426 Hemi that Chrysler was using in NASCAR, so it had to do something to remain competitive. The answer was to build a new engine that could compete, and work began on the Boss 429. The engine would have never made it into production vehicles, but NASCAR’s homologation rules required a minimum of 500 cars be equipped with the engine and sold to the general public for it to be used.

At the time, Ford’s finances weren’t the best thanks to building the Boss 302 and its subsequent Trans Am variant for the SCCA Trans Am series. To make everything financially sound, Ford used the four-speed Cobra Jet Mustang as a template and commissioned Kar Kraft to make the necessary modifications, which were, in all honesty, quite extensive. The Boss 429 was produced for the 1969 and 1970 model years in a total of 1358 examples – 859 of which were built for ’69 and 499 for 1970. Furthermore, two of the 1969 models were actually Boss 429 Cougars.

Now that you know a little bit about the history of the Boss 429 Mustang let’s take a closer look at this 1969 model and talk a little more about the changes that went into making it possible and what – outside of the low production numbers — made the car so special.

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1962 Ford Falcon Squire Wagon

1962 Ford Falcon Squire Wagon

The compact car that changed America

Mostly known as Australia’s longest-running nameplate (set to be discontinued at the end of 2016), the Ford Falcon also had a North American sibling for a full decade. It was introduced in 1960, alongside the Australian model, but while its cousin from Down Under soldiered on for more than five decades, the U.S.-spec version was discontinued in 1970.

Although short-lived, the Falcon was an influential car and marked the beginning of a new era not just for Ford, but for the entire North American industry too. The compact was conceived in the late 1950s, when Ford realized that larger cars were becoming increasingly expensive and many American families were looking at smaller vehicles, usually imports, for a second car.

Penned under Ford’s then general manager Robert S. McNamara, the Falcon was developed with parts sourced from the company’s existing bin in order to keep costs as low as possible. FoMoCo also focused on reducing ownership costs. Furthermore, it developed several body styles in order to cover as many niches and customer requirements as possible. The lineup included two- and four-door sedans, three- and five-door wagons, and two-door coupe and convertible models.

The first-generation Falcon Squire Wagon, which we’ll be discussing below, arrived in 1962, two years after the Falcon’s initial launch. By that time, the compact had already become a hit, setting record sales with over 500,000 units sold in 1960 and over 1,000,000 examples sold by the end of 1961. The Falcon was redesigned for 1964, getting a more squared-off, more modern look.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ford Falcon Squire Wagon.

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