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The Ford Mustang Crashes Enough, And a New Recall Says It Could Get Much Worse

The Ford Mustang Crashes Enough, And a New Recall Says It Could Get Much Worse

Best cover your bases before you get into an accident

The Ford Mustang is the world’s best-selling performance car, but just because it’s popular, that doesn’t mean it’s immune to mechanical issues and the recalls that come after that. Brace for some bad news, then, owners of the 2020 Ford Mustang. There’s a good chance that your muscle car will be recalled after Ford submitted documents to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) saying that more than 38,000 units of the 2020 Mustang could have a defective brake pedal bracket assembly.

The defect is largely contained to Mustangs with automatic transmissions; Mustangs with manual transmissions aren’t affected. It’s a tough blow for owners of 2020 Mustangs that are affected by the recall, especially if you live outside the U.S.

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This Is What The Infamous 'Death Wobble' is Like On A Newer Ford F-350

This Is What The Infamous ’Death Wobble’ is Like On A Newer Ford F-350

The issue is serious, risky, and far too common to be ignored or taken lightly

Have you heard of ’Death Wobble’? If you are a truck owner or truck enthusiast, you would’ve come across this term often. Jeep came under scrutiny for this, but Ford customers have also reported this issue on the Super Duty trucks.

There are multiple videos and complaints on the internet where the drivers experience violent jostling and shaking from the whole front end and it feels like the vehicle is just going to tear apart. To get an idea of how it feels, check out this video of a 2018 Ford F-350 experiencing a death wobble on the highway out of nowhere.

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The Ford Explorer and Jeep Grand Cherokee Fail Miserably in Recent IIHS Crash Testing

The Ford Explorer and Jeep Grand Cherokee Fail Miserably in Recent IIHS Crash Testing

It’s not the kind of news that both SUVs want to attached to

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has flagged the Ford Explorer and Jeep Grand Cherokee after both SUVs scored an overall rating of “poor” in the agency’s recent crash test examination. According to results of the passenger-side small overlap front crash tests, both SUVs showed a high risk of injury to a front passenger with potentially fatal ramifications.

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Is the 2018 Ford Escape a Death Trap? IIHS Testing Shows it Might Be if You're the Passenger

Is the 2018 Ford Escape a Death Trap? IIHS Testing Shows it Might Be if You’re the Passenger

Ford’s SUV performed worse than seven similar models, including the Jeep Compass, Chevy Equinox, and GMC Terrain

The 2018 Ford Escape is, by most accounts, a good crossover. But its safety is being thrown into question after the model received the worst rating among seven small SUVs from the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety’s passenger-side small overlap crash performance. Of all the SUV models that were tested, the Escape turned in the only ’poor’ rating among the group, a stunning grade considering that most of its rivals, including the Jeep Compass, Chevrolet Equinox, and GMC Terrain, all received ’good’ ratings.

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The 2018 F-150 Earns Big With IIHS Safety Ratings – Except For One Thing

The 2018 F-150 Earns Big With IIHS Safety Ratings – Except For One Thing

A Top Safety Pick+ award is even lost over the issue

The Ford F-150’s skin might be made from recycled beer cans, but the full-size pickup scored very well in the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s barrage of testing. Since it debuted in 2015, the current F-150 has scored a “Good” in all crash tests. But, things aren’t all rainbows and butterflies for the half-ton pickup. The 2018 F-150 is too short-sighted to earn the IIHS’ Top Safety Pick+. The reason: it can’t see well in the dark.

The IIHS rates the F-150’s headlights as “Poor” in all five of its tests.

Both the base halogen headlights in the lower-trimmed F-150 and the LED headlights in the more expensive models scored a “Poor” in visibility testing. The halogen lights’ low and high beams fall short in straightaway visibility on the left and right sides of the road. The low beams only give 149 feet of visibility on the right, and 89 feet on the left and the high beams only shine 412 feet and 317, respectively. In curves, the headlights perform even worse, providing an average of only 102 feet of visibility with the low beams and 148 feet with the high beams in the four different curve tests done by the IIHS.

Jumping up to the LED headlights don’t help the situation, though they perform a tab bit better. The low beams shine 323 feet on the right and 168 feet on the left, while the high beams shine 544 feet on the right and 428 feet on the left. In turns, the LED low beams illuminate an average of 135 feet ahead, and the high beams shine an average of 163 feet ahead. The unfortunate trade-off for the better performance is excessive glare for oncoming traffic with the low beams. They exceed the IIHS’ glare threshold between 94.8 and 187.9 percent. That’s not good.

There’s more to this story below.

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Ford Says 2011-2017 Explorers Are Safe, But Will Fix Them Anyway

Ford Says 2011-2017 Explorers Are Safe, But Will Fix Them Anyway

Customer concerns over leaking exhaust fumes cited as reason behind voluntary servicing

The Ford Explorer recently made headlines due to exhaust fumes entering the cabin and making people nauseous. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration received more than 2,400 reports on the issue, with at least 41 citing injuries and three reporting crashes due to the ill effects of the carbon monoxide fumes on the 2011 through 2017 Explorer. However, investigations by the NHTSA and Ford turned up no significant changes in CO levels in the cabin. Well, except for Police Interceptor models. Ford says the issue stems from aftermarket up-fit companies leaving unsealed holes from the installation of police equipment. Still, Ford says it will fix any of the 1.3 million affected Explorers at the owner’s request, despite Ford calling the vehicles safe.

Ford’s voluntary service is free to Explorer owners regardless of the warranty status or vehicle mileage. The fix includes reprogramming the air conditioner, replacing the liftgate drain valves, and inspecting the sealing of the rear of the vehicle. Ford dealerships will begin offering this service starting November 1, 2017, and will continue through December 31, 2018. Of the Explorers built in that 2011 through 2017 timeframe, roughly 1.3 million are in the U.S., 84,000 are in Canada, and 24,000 are in Mexico.

Continue reading for more information.

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Ford Mustang's Failed NCAP Testing Proves Safety Comes Second

Ford Mustang’s Failed NCAP Testing Proves Safety Comes Second

When you look at the big picture, it’s hard to miss the reasoning behind the two-star NCAP rating

Last month we covered the story about how the 2017 Ford Mustang miserably failed Euro NCAP testing, earning the worst rating out of the 15 recently tested vehicles: two out of five stars. It did worse than a number of models, including models like the Hyundai Ioniq, Audi Q2, and even the SsangYong Tivoli. It’s a bit surprising, but testing showed that there is a high chance for upper-body injury and head injury for rear passengers during frontal crashes and a high possibility of whiplash for rear passengers in side-impact testing. Front passengers are also at risk of injury thanks to those airbags that don’t inflate properly. Meanwhile, a similar U.S.-Spec model performed fairly well during IIHS testing, with “Good” ratings for Moderate overlap, side impact, roof strength, head restraints, and seats, to go with an acceptable rating for small overlap testing. So, what separates the U.S.-spec and Euro-spec models? A serious lack of equipment and it proves that the blue oval has its sights on something other than safety.

The two-star NCAP rating can be blamed on the lack of safety equipment for rear passengers, semi-autonomous safety technology, and the fact that the front airbags that didn’t deploy properly. See, the Euro-spec model doesn’t get things like a forward-collision warning system or other safety features like lane-keep assist or pre-collision assist – all things that are standard or available on U.S.-spec models. There are no rear seatbelt pretensioners or load limiters which means lots of body movement for rear passengers in the unfortunate event of an accident. One child test dummy was even found to have slid under the seatbelt during a full-width frontal test while the other smacked his head on the interior trim.

So far, Ford has remained largely silent on the issue but, according to NCAP, has said that orders placed after May 2017 will be for the facelifted 2018 model that will include pre-collision assist with pedestrian protection, forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, and a lane-keeping aid. It’s great that Ford wants to rectify the situation with the facelifted model, but what does the failed testing of the current model really mean?

Keep reading to connect the dots that led to this failed safety test

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Out of 15 Cars Tested by Euro NCAP, the Ford Mustang Scored Worst

Out of 15 Cars Tested by Euro NCAP, the Ford Mustang Scored Worst

The results serve as a reminder that Ford has some things to iron out before the facelifted model hits European dealers

The facelifted Ford Mustang did pretty well here in the U.S. when the IIHS put it through the paces at its crash test facility. It scored “Acceptable” in small overlap testing, and “Good” it moderate overlap, side collision, roof strength, and head restraints and seats testing. But, Ford fans over in Europe are stuck with the pre-facelifted model for a bit longer, as it didn’t perform all that well in Euro NCAP’s crash testing, scoring just two stars out of five when everything was said and done. In fact, out of the 15 cars recently tested by NCAP, including models like the Volvo V90 and S90 duo, the Audi Q2, Hyundai Ioniq, Suzuki Ignis, and even the SsangYong Tivoli, the 2016 Mustang was the absolute weakest link.

Now, before we get into the results, I want to make note that the Euro version of the Mustang doesn’t have all of the same equipment that’s found on the U.S. version, including things like seatbelt pre-tensioners and load limiters in the rear and a Forward Collision Warning system, among others, so that two-star rating isn’t completely representative of how safe the Mustang is, but it’s troubling nonetheless. Where the Mustang really failed was in relation to rear passengers, where the lack of pretensioners and load limiters play a huge role. In full-width frontal testing, rear test dummies showed significant potential for injury to the upper body, and thighs. Rear seat dummies also showed a high possibility of whiplash during a rear impact. Rear sitting children also have the potential for head injury during lateral impact and torso injury during frontal impact.

Front seat passengers saw mixed ratings during the Frontal Offset Deformable Barrier testing with the driver having adequate protection over most of their body, with the neck and thigh protection rated as good. The front passenger saw adequate protection for head and lower legs, while having good protection of the neck, torso, and thighs. During rear testing, front seat occupants received a marginal rating for whiplash protection. It should also be noted that the front driver and passenger airbags didn’t inflate properly on frontal offset testing, which also led to such a low rating. During the full-width front test, the rear passenger slid under the seat belt while the rear child dummy smacked his head on the interior trim during side impact crash testing.

Keep reading for the rest of the story

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Watch the 2017 Ford Super Duty Undergo Crash Testing

Watch the 2017 Ford Super Duty Undergo Crash Testing

Ford’s newest pickup undergoes Government testing

The 2017 Ford Super Duty is the newest thing under the Blue Oval banner, but that certainly doesn’t make it immune from harm. In fact, like all new vehicles, the Super Duty had to undergo crash testing to ensure its crashworthiness. And if you’re anything like me, you get some weird enjoyment out of seeing a brand new vehicle smash against a wall. Luckily for us, these cash tests are filmed for evaluation and posterity.

The video above shows a 2017 Super Duty SuperCrew XL long bed meeting its demise against a flat wall at 35 mph under the supervision of National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The coolest part is the truck’s one-off paintjob. Designed to allow easy viewing and contact determination, the underbody parts are all color-coordinated while the interior is coated in what appears to be flat white paint from a spray can. Imagine having the job of rattle-canning the interior of new cars….

The slow-motion footage is rather fun to watch, especially the view from underneath the truck. The driveline parts, exhaust components, and the full-boxed frame are all clearly visible.

According to CrashNet1, the video’s YouTube host, the F-250 earned a Five-Star rating in the frontal crash, a Five-Star in the side-impact crash, and a Four-Star in the overall rating. The lowest score earned was in the rollover category, with the 4WD Super Duty earning only Three Stars, while the RWD version earned Four Stars.

We’ve got more Super Duty crash test videos below the jump, so keep scrolling for more!

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The New Ford Super Duty Gets Smarter: Video

The New Ford Super Duty Gets Smarter: Video

Modern safety tech now available, but you’ll be paying for its schooling

The all-new Ford Super Duty is on the cusp of fulltime production and arrival at dealerships around the country. Ford, of course, is hyping customers by showcasing the truck’s new features. There’s no exception for the Super Duty’s safety systems. This short video details all the new driver assist technology never previously available on the Super Duty.

Included in the mix is Adaptive Radar, Blind Spot Information System, Adaptive Steering, and Lane Departure Warning.

Adaptive Radar, Ford says, is especially handy when towing. While I’m not too keen on using cruise control why towing in traffic, the system will keep a set distance between your bumper and the car ahead. Lane Departure Warning is another safety feature that some drivers will like. Cross either lane marking and the steering wheel vibrates, mimicking the feel of rumble strips.

Adaptive Steering is also new. The system makes steering wheel efforts light and easy at low speeds and stiffer at highway speeds. This helps in both low-speed maneuverability – like when backing a trailer – and making sudden lane-change movement less likely on the highway. Last but not least is Ford’s Blind Spot Information System. It’s more than your average blind spot monitoring system, though. This one actually monitors the blind spots beside your trailer. Yep, when a trailer is connected, the truck uses sensors in its taillights to monitor the area beside the trailer, alerting the driver if a vehicle is traveling beside.

These features will go a long way to making the Super Duty a safer truck to operate and a safer truck to drive near. It’s great to see these technologies from the half-ton F-150 make their way into the heavy-duty segment. Of course, the cost of these systems will be passed onto the consumer, likely making the Super Duty more expensive than before. Thankfully most of the systems will be optional on higher-trimmed trucks, leaving those wanting a base XL work truck with a smaller price tag.

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Ford Mustang, Chevy Camaro, Dodge Challenger Fail To Meet IIHS Crash-Test Standards

Ford Mustang, Chevy Camaro, Dodge Challenger Fail To Meet IIHS Crash-Test Standards

America’s iconic muscle cars are far from safe in the event of a crash

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) has just put America’s most iconic muscle cars, the Ford Mustang, Chevrolet Camaro, and Dodge Challenger, through its full battery of crash tests and announced that they all fell short of the Top Safety Pick status. To put that into perspective, all 65 2016-model-year vehicles tested up until now have achieved either the Top Safety Pick or Top Safety Pick+ ratings.

To qualify for Top Safety Pick, vehicles must earn good ratings in the small overlap front, moderate overlap front, side, roof strength and head restraint evaluations, and have a basic front crash prevention system. To earn Top Safety Pick+, cars must score good ratings in all five crash tests and earn an advanced or superior rating for front crash prevention.

According to the Institute, the Mustang came closest to earning Top Safety Pick, while the Camaro fell short in one category and lacks an available front crash prevention system. The Challenger is most in need of improvement, which isn’t surprising given that the current model is nine years old as of 2016. But despite failing to earn Top Safety Pick, all three cars scored good ratings for occupant protection in a moderate overlap front crash and side impact.

Although the IIHS doesn’t usually test sports cars, as they make up a small share of the market, the Institute decided to evaluate these models with optional V-8 engines because "they are big sellers in their class, and consumers often ask how they would perform in crash tests." As it turns out, not so good.

To sum it up, the Challenger suffered from extensive intrusion in the lower occupant compartment and the Mustang’s roof buckled and compromised the driver’s survival space. The Camaro, which was redesigned for the 2016 model year, fared better as its cage was strong enough and showcased a low risk of injuries to the dummy’s legs, but the lack of an available front crash prevention system altered its final score.

Added in 2012, the small overlap test replicates what happens when a vehicle runs off the road and hits a tree or pole or crashes into another vehicle that has crossed the center line. In the test, 25 percent of the total width of the vehicle strikes the five-foot-tall rigid barrier on the driver side at 40 mph. The test involves a vehicle’s outer edges, which aren’t well-protected by the crush-zone structures and crash forces go directly into the front wheel, suspension system and, firewall.

Continue reading for the full story.

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2016 Ford F-150 Wins Top Safety Pick, Other Trucks Fall Short

2016 Ford F-150 Wins Top Safety Pick, Other Trucks Fall Short

IIHS tests give bad news to Chevy, Ram, and Toyota

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has completed testing on the current crop of 2016 full-size pickups, and the results are surprising. The 2016 Ford F-150 was the only pickup to earn a Top Safety Pick through “Good” ratings, while other pickups scored lower on the rankings.

The tests included the relatively new small overlap frontal crash test, along with the moderate overlap frontal, side impact, rollover protection, and seat testing for rear-end crashes. The small overlap test proved to be the downfall for several of the trucks, the most notable of which was the 2016 Ram 1500.

Both crew cab and extended cab variations had major structural damage to the driver’s compartment that would likely have resulted in driver injury. Both cab variations received the rating of poor for structure while overall scores were listed as marginal.

The bad news continues to Chevrolet and Toyota, as both the Silverado Crew Cab and Tundra Crew Cab performed worse than their respective Extended Cab models. Both crew cab versions received the rating of marginal, whereas the shorter, extended cab models actually received the rating of acceptable.

Conversely, the 2016 Ford F-150 performed well in the battery of testing, earning a score of good for both extended cab and crew cab configurations. When equipped with the optional Forward Collision Warning system, the IIHS honors the F-150 with its Top Safety Pick award.

Continue reading for the full story.

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UAW May Strike at Ford's Kansas City Assembly Plant, Disrupting F-150 Production

UAW May Strike at Ford’s Kansas City Assembly Plant, Disrupting F-150 Production

Ford’s Kansas City Assembly Plant in Missouri is under threat of strike by the UAW Local 249 if the automaker and union cannot come to an agreement before Sunday, October 4, 2015. According to UAW leaders, Ford had failed to resolve issues surrounding worker safety, wages, and other employment issues.

Both the F-150 pickup and Transit van are produced at the facility.

The union has accused Ford of not negotiating in good faith to resolve the issues in a timely manner, and therefore has created a deadline of 1 pm local time on Sunday. If an agreement is not reached by that time, nearly 7,000 workers will stage a walk-off.

Despite the lack of an agreement, the automaker and UAW have reportedly met more than 40 times since April to discuss the issues. “We work every day to avoid a disruption of our production,” Ford said in a statement to Automotive News, “and we are confident we will be able to negotiate a fair and competitive labor agreement with our UAW partners.”

According to Jimmy Settles, the UAW vice president, the issues include “manpower provisions, the national heat stress program, and skilled trades scheduling, amongst others.” Other reports detail the issues to be a safety concern regarding excessive heat exposure, scheduling for skilled tradesmen, and provisions for manpower at the Kansas City Assembly Plant.

In the event Ford and the UAW do not come to an agreement, a strike at the KCAP could spell disaster for Ford’s supply of new F-150s and Transit vans. Ford has already been dealing with a slow supply of the F-150 thanks to parts supplier issues. Any additional delays could result in dramatically reduced inventories at the dealership level.

Continue reading for more information

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Ford Announces Camera-Based Advanced Front Lighting System

Ford Announces Camera-Based Advanced Front Lighting System

Of all the safety features that have come out in recent years, few have done anything to make night driving any safer… with the exception, of course, of night-vision systems that are only offered by high-end luxury makes. Ford just announced that it is creating a new lighting technology that takes adaptive headlights to a new level.

Still in the development phase, Ford’s Camera-Based Advanced Front Lighting System uses existing technologies such as Adaptive Front Lighting System and Traffic Sign Recognition to adjust lighting in certain driving conditions. The coolest of which is the ability to dim the left-side lights when going around a right-hand turn to avoid blinding the on-coming driver while simultaneously curving the high beams to the right to illuminate even more of the road surface. When possible, the system uses GPS to detect turns (including roundabouts), and when a satellite signal isn’t available, it uses the car’s forward-mounted camera.

Another helpful feature of the system is the ability to detect road signs and add extra lighting along the side of the roads to make reading the signs easier and at a greater distance. And still more, an additional element of the safety feature is Spot Lighting, which uses the camera to detect road hazards (including pedestrians and some larger animals) and can warn the driver accordingly.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Ford Issues Safety Recall For Focus, C-Max And Escape

Ford Issues Safety Recall For Focus, C-Max And Escape

Ford Motor Company has just issued a recall of roughly 433,000 vehicles in North America, with affected vehicles including the 2015 Ford Focus, C-MAX and Escape. The recall concerns an issue with the listed vehicles’ “body control module,” wherein the engine could continue to run even after the ignition has been turned off and the key has been removed, or after pressing the engine’s start/stop button. 

Currently, Ford is not reporting any accidents or injuries associated with the issue. Customers can take their affected vehicles to a local dealer for a free software update to the faulty module.

The malfunction is non-compliant with FMVSS 114, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s standard regarding theft protection and rollaway prevention. 

Ford says that the recall encompasses 374,781 vehicles in the United States and federalized territories, 52,180 vehicles in Canada and 5,135 vehicles in Mexico.

The affected vehicles include certain 2015 Focus models built at the Michigan Assembly Plant between June 17th, 2014, and June 12th, 2015; certain 2015 C-MAX models built at the Michigan Assembly Plant between April 22nd, 2014, and June 12th, 2015; and certain 2015 Escape models built at the Louisville Assembly Plant between April 1st, 2014, and June 12th, 2015.

This latest recall is the second issued in less than a month for the Escape, with another recall issued only a few weeks ago over issues regarding faulty instrument clusters.

Continue reading for the full story.

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IIHS Prepares New Crash Tests Due To Equipment Issues On Ford F-150

IIHS Prepares New Crash Tests Due To Equipment Issues On Ford F-150

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety is currently investigating the presence of extra safety equipment fitted to the CrewCab version of Ford’s hot-selling 2015 Ford F-150 and why the particular structural enhancements are not found on Regular and SuperCrew body styles.

The CrewCab reportedly makes up 70 percent of F-150 sales, and the IIHS typically conducts the majority of its crash testing on a vehicle’s highest-selling variant. The investigation, according to Automotive News, is to determine if Ford is beefing up its SuperCrew to withstand the IIHS’ testing while leaving the less-popular cab configurations less protected.

The issues stems from metal structural beams both in front of and behind the F-150’s front tires. The beams are bolted to the truck’s frame and are designed to divert the tire away from the passenger compartment in the event of a small overlap front crash. No such beams are present on Regular or SuperCab models.

Granted, all cab variations have been tested by the U.S. government’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in moderate overlap crash tests. All three cab configurations earned the NHTSA’s highest ranking of five stars. The IIHS, however, is the only organization that tests for the small overlap crashworthiness – a test that only began in 2012.

The IIHS will be conduction small overlap testing on both Regular and SuperCrew cab F-150s to determine if the missing structural pieces effect the truck’s crash rating. When contacted by AN, Ford responded with, “…supplementary material [was added] to our SuperCrew configuration to reinforce cab strength.” The automaker continues saying, “We optimize each cab structure based on many factors, including cab style, mass, wheelbase, powertrain, and driveline to meet regulatory requirements and achieve public domain ratings.”

Continue reading to learn more about this story.

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2015 Ford F-150 Recalled For Upper I-Shaft Issues

2015 Ford F-150 Recalled For Upper I-Shaft Issues

Ford Motor Company has just issued a recall on the 2015 F-150 due to an improperly riveted upper I-shaft on 12,328 vehicles in North America. The I-shaft, the mechanical linkage from the steering wheel to the steering box, could potentially separate at the riveted joint, causing an abrupt loss in steering.

Thankfully, there have been no reported accidents or injuries surrounding this incident, but Ford is aware of one reported loss of steering that is likely related.

Of the 12,328 F-150s affected, 8,963 are in the U.S. and its territories, 3,348 are in Canada, and 17 are in Mexico. Of those, 6,722 pickup trucks are still on dealership lots, meaning repairs will be done before being sold. Still, 5,606 trucks are already in customers’ hands. Those owners can expect to receive a letter informing them of the recall.

The affected trucks were built at the Kansas City Assembly Plant from March 19, 2015 to March 21, 2015 and at the Dearborn Truck Plant from March 21, 2015 to March 30, 2015.

The upper I-shaft will be inspected by dealers and replaced if necessary. As with all recalls, the service will come at no cost to the owner.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2015 Ford F-150.

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2015 Ford F-150 Earns NHTSA 5-Stars; Here's How:

2015 Ford F-150 Earns NHTSA 5-Stars; Here’s How:

Ford’s new 2015 F-150 might have a body made from aluminum, but as the NHTSA found out, the truck is no beer can. Recent testing by the government agency showed the truck withstood the standardized crash tests with ease, earning the F-150 a five-star rating – the highest available. So how did Ford engineers design the truck to withstand a 40 mph impact impact without pancaking like an empty can of Natty Lite under a pair of work boots on Friday night?

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2015 Ford F-150 Earns NHTSA 5-Stars; Here's How:

2015 Ford F-150 Earns NHTSA 5-Stars; Here’s How:

Ford’s new 2015 F-150 might have a body made from aluminum, but as the NHTSA found out, the truck is no beer can. Recent testing by the government agency showed the truck withstood the standardized crash tests with ease, earning the F-150 a five-star rating – the highest available. So how did Ford engineers design the truck to withstand a 40 mph impact impact without pancaking like an empty can of Natty Lite under a pair of work boots on Friday night?

High-strength steel, a built-in roll cage, and supercomputers.

As it turns out, the F-150’s new frame isn’t just for weight reduction or payload capacity. Like all new body-on-frame vehicles these days, the F-150’s frame uses crumple zones with corrugated steel to act as shock absorbers during a crash. The difference with Ford’s design is the shape of the frame itself. Rather than using a simple box shape, engineers added bends at the corners of the frame’s box shape, essentially giving the box 12 sides.

Within the aluminum body, engineers used hydroforming techniques to shape the military-grade, high-strength aluminum. Those hydroformed pieces make up the roof rails and the door structure. A separate process called extruding is used to create the roof pillars and rocker panels, giving the F-150 a built-in roll cage of sorts.

Many of those aluminum parts are bonded together using an equally high-tech approach. Rather than welding, the parts are joined together using high-strength adhesives, which Ford says are stronger than conventional welds in many cases.

All of this technology was tested in the digital world long before the first F-150 met its fate against the crash barrier. Engineers used computer modeling to predict how each component would behave in the impact – even down to the smallest nut and bolt. Check out the awesome GIFs of these computerized crashed below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2015 Ford F-150’s safety test.

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