Cars GMC GMC Envoy

GMC Envoy

2002 GMC Envoy

2002 GMC Envoy
- image 111688
main image
  • GMC Envoy
  • Year:
    2002
  • Make:
  • Model:

The GMC Envoy was launched for 2002 as an upscale, “professional grade” iteration of the prolific General Motors GMT-360 midsize SUV platform that has spawned the Buick Rainier, Chevrolet TrailBlazer, Oldsmobile Bravada, and most recently, the Saab 9-7x. The Envoy’s high feature content, strong powertrains, impressive on- and off-road ability, and varied work talents earned it praise and distinction.

6 photos

Latest GMC Envoy news and reviews:

The Forgotten Inline Engine: GM's 4.2-liter Atlas I-6

The Forgotten Inline Engine: GM’s 4.2-liter Atlas I-6

The story of GM’s high-tech straight-six and why it died

General Motors has a long history with making innovative strides in engine development. The Chevrolet small-block V-8, for example, began life in the 1950s and soon became the standard for high horsepower in a small package – a legacy that continues into today’s fifth-generation GM V-8s. Even GM’s lineup of V-6 engines is impressive, ranging from the 60-degree V-6 that powered nearly every GM car from 1980 through 2010, up to the twin-turbocharged V-6 powering the Cadillac ATS-V. However, GM has a lesser-known engine family that deserves admiration for its outside-the-box thinking and outstanding technological advancements: the Atlas inline family.

That Atlas family had three main members, the front-running 4.2-liter inline-six, the 3.5-liter five-cylinder, and the 2.8-liter four-cylinder. All three shared the same basic architecture and a wide range of parts, though it was the 4.2-liter that led the Atlas program.

The 4.2-liter called the GMT360 platform home. This included the Chevrolet Trailblazer, GMC Envoy, Buick Rainier, Oldsmobile Bravada, Isuzu Ascender, and Saab 9-7X. Each of these mid-sized SUVs shared the same architecture, including the industry’s first fully hydroformed frame in a mid-size SUV. Introduced for the 2002 model year, the GMT360 platform sold a couple million examples worldwide before ending production after 2009.

The 4.2-liter Atlas LL8, otherwise called the Vortec 4200, was a groundbreaking engine for GM. It featured an all-aluminum construction, dual overhead cams with variable valve timing on the exhaust side, four valves per cylinder, a coil-on-plug ignition system, a high compression ratio of 10:1, and its cylinder heads featured GM’s then-prevalent “Vortec” engineering designed to maximize airflow.

This combination allowed for the production of 1.06 horsepower per cubic inch – a total of 270 horsepower at 6,000 rpm. Torque was rated at 275 pound-feet at 3,600 rpm, but 90 percent of peak torque was available between 1,600 and 5,600 rpm. These stats far exceeded every comparable V-6 on the market at the time, including GM’s own 4.3-liter Vortec V-6.

We decided to take a closer look at the Vortec 4200 and its forward-thinking design. We reached out to GM and found Tom Sutter, the Assistant Chief Engineer for the Atlas. Sutter has been involved with engine programs for the last 30 years, ranging from Oldsmobile’s Quad Four to Cadillac’s current V-Series mills. Sutter was able to give us a deeper insight into the Atlas program, so keep reading for more.

Continue reading for more information.

Read more
2002 GMC Envoy

2002 GMC Envoy

The GMC Envoy was launched for 2002 as an upscale, “professional grade” iteration of the prolific General Motors GMT-360 midsize SUV platform that has spawned the Buick Rainier, Chevrolet TrailBlazer, Oldsmobile Bravada, and most recently, the Saab 9-7x. The Envoy’s high feature content, strong powertrains, impressive on- and off-road ability, and varied work talents earned it praise and distinction.

Read more