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2020 GMC Canyon - Driven

2020 GMC Canyon - Driven

The automaker has revamped and rejigged the Canyon lineup, and it looks more balanced than before

GMC Canyon has been around for quite some time now, and together with the Chevy Colorado, it is raking up respectable numbers for General Motors. The Canyon is positioned as a more premium and stylish version of the Colorado. Thanks to the growing competition, GMC has had to put its best foot forward to not let the newcomers like the Jeep Gladiator take a share of its pie.

To make sure of this, GMC has rejigged the 2021 Canyon’s lineup by making some big changes. For starters, the top-spec Denali trim has gotten all the more premium, while the All-Terrain trim is dropped in favor of the exciting new AT4 trim that is present on the big brother Sierra as well. Will these changes and additions be able to induce more sales for GMC?

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2021 GMC Canyon Syclone by Specialty Vehicle Engineering

2021 GMC Canyon Syclone by Specialty Vehicle Engineering

SVE is back with the second edition of the modern-day Syclone; this time with 750 horses under the hood!

We’ve been seeing a lot of revived monikers lately, so why not add one more to the list? This one, however, is revived by an aftermarket company and not the automaker itself. We’re talking about the GMC Syclone that was launched almost three decades back but was way ahead of its time. Specialty Vehicles Engineering, an aftermarket company based out of New Jersey, brought the Syclone badge back last year, and now it is following up with the 2021 model.

The 2021 Syclone is based on the 2021 GMC Canyon.The highlight of the 2021 Syclone is that it has 300 horses more than its predecessor, the 2019 GMC Syclone. We’re talking about 750 horses in a compact truck with a variety of other upgrades and a moniker that set the path to change the course of how trucks are generally viewed. Need we say anything more?

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2020 Ford Explorer vs 2019 GMC Acadia: How They Compare

2020 Ford Explorer vs 2019 GMC Acadia: How They Compare

Which is better: The Ford Explorer or GMC Acadia

The new, redesigned, Ford Explorer is here, and Ford touts it as an "adventure enabler." It’s got more room on the inside, more gizmos, and it can tow a heavier payload than before. But, as the mid-size crossover SUV segment gets busier and busier, the Explorer must execute to perfection in all areas to remain at the top of the pile. One of its competitors will be GMC’s Acadia.

Ford launched the new, sixth-generation, Explorer at an event at Ford Field in Detroit on Wednesday. The automaker says its focus has been on the customer 100%, trying to see what are the areas that the customers are most displeased with and then eliminating these "pain points." The result, Ford says, is a "reinvented" Explorer. Let’s see how well it stacks up against the soon-to-be 3-year-old GMC Acadia.

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Consumer Reports Rips the 2018 GMC Terrain to Shreds in its Latest Review

Consumer Reports Rips the 2018 GMC Terrain to Shreds in its Latest Review

We haven’t seen a beatdown this bad since Goldberg squashed Brock Lesnar in 2016

Consumer Reports does not like the new GMC Terrain. Actually, that might be an understatement of its own because the publication just laid the smackdown on the new Terrain, squashing the SUV in one of the most damning video reviews we’ve seen in a while. There was a lot said in the space of three minutes, and almost all of them were criticisms of the Terrain. It may only be an opinion of one man — in this case, Autos Editor Mike Quincy — but the beatdown isn’t going to make the Terrain look any better in the eyes of consumers.

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2019 GMC Terrain Black Edition

2019 GMC Terrain Black Edition

Dark trim touches for a custom look

The GMC Terrain has been around since 2009, first breaking cover at the New York International Auto Show. The second-gen model arrived earlier this year in Detroit, and now, there’s a special Black Edition heading to New York offering a select number of dark aesthetic upgrades.

Continue reading to learn more about the GMC Terrain Black Edition.

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The 2018 GMC Terrain's E-Shifter Isn't That Bad

The 2018 GMC Terrain’s E-Shifter Isn’t That Bad

Expect for manually shifting gears, which sucks

When the 2018 GMC Terrain debuted at the 2017 Detroit Auto Show, the automotive press took a collective gasp at the push-button shifter design GMC tried selling as “intuitive.” I even wrote an op-ed titled “Really GMC? This Shifter Idea Is Lame!” Needless to say I wasn’t impressed. Well, this week has the all-new 2018 GMC Terrain in my driveway and I have to admit it – the E-shifter isn’t as terrible as I expected it to be.

The buttons are logically arranged in the familiar PRNDL order, so there is no guessing at gear locations. Park is by far the simplest to engage. Just push the large button. Reverse and Drive are selected by pulling the toggle switch with a curved finger. Neutral and Low (which should really be labeled M for manual) are activated by pushes, as well. In manual mode, the (-) and (+) buttons do the obvious to the nine-speed automatic transmission.

Keep reading for more on the 2018 GMC Terrain’s E-Shifter.

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2018 GMC Terrain

2018 GMC Terrain

The new Terrain sits firmly in the Compact Market and can compete with more expensive offerings

The GMC Terrain hit the market in 2010 as GMC’s smallest SUV, but because of its odd size, it lingered between the compact and midsize segments, often being called a “tweener” by some. It soldiered on for six years without any change until 2016 when GMC did a mild update. Even then, it wasn’t up to competing well and common complaints included that it was inferior in terms of technology and design. So, to remain relevant, GMC had to start working on the next-gen model, and it finally debuted at the 2017 Detroit Auto Show as a 2018 model. With the new generation comes a sleeker and stylish exterior design that leaves the SUV’s old, boxy nature in the past. It gets some new technology that includes LED daytime running lights, HID headlamps on some trim levels, and an updated infotainment system that finally brings it into the modern ages. Under the hood, you’ll find the option of three different turbocharged four-bangers, one of which is a diesel and a pair of all-new nine-speed automatic transmission. But, more importantly, it rides on GM’s new D2XX architecture which should mean a lower curb weight and a stronger framework.

Speaking of Framework, that D2XX platform is the same architecture that underpins models like the Chevy Bolt, Chevy Cruze, 2018 Chevy Equinox, and even the Buick Envision – that’s right, these days buying an SUV means you get the same basic framework that is found in cars. As rumors suggested prior to its debut, the option of a V-6 engine dies off with the current generation, but those turbocharged four bangers should offer superior fuel economy. But, this new-gen model brings a lot more to the table than we can talk about here, so take a virtual walk with me, and we’ll go into the finer details before this baby hits showrooms.

Updated 5/3/2017: Pricing has been announced for the new GMC Terrain, with the entry-level model starting out at just $25,970, while the range-topping Denali trim starts out at $38,495. Check out the prices section below for more details.

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2016 GMC Terrain

2016 GMC Terrain

GMC has just announced a host of enhancements for its popular midsize crossover ahead of the 2015 New York Auto Show. This mid-life refresh of the GMC Terrain consists of visual updates, both inside and out, that will hopefully breath new life into its sales. Not that its sales are slacking – GMC says the crossover had its best year ever in 2014, selling 105,016 units in total.

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