Here’s Why You Don’t Need To Wait For An Updated Nissan Z - story fullscreen Fullscreen

Here’s Why You Don’t Need To Wait For An Updated Nissan Z

Waiting for a Nissan Z Facelift may be pointless. Here’s why

The Nissan Z finally made its official debut on 18th August 2021 and you will be able to order yours in spring 2022. With this in mind, a question you may be asking is “should I wait for the updated version?” The Nissan Z, like all other cars, will eventually receive a facelift. Although we can only guess how an updated version of the car would look like, it’s common knowledge that facelifted versions fix all (or at least some) imperfections of new models. However, this may not necessarily be the case with the Nissan Z, so is there really a need to wait a few years to get one?

Here's Why You Don't Need To Wait For An Updated Nissan Z Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 1009642

When a newly developed car comes out, it’s often accompanied by a lot of uncertainties regarding long-term reliability or other unfavorable quirks. Because of this, many people wait for the updated version of a car, as it sometimes means a more trouble-free ownership experience. However, the Nissan Z is not exactly a new car, as it shares a lot with the 370Z – a car that has proven itself over its 12-year production cycle as a reliable and fun Japanese sports car.

High reliability score for its predecessor

Here's Why You Don't Need To Wait For An Updated Nissan Z Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 1009681

According to J.D. Power’s reliability ratings, the Nissan 370Z scores better than most throughout most model years. Things are even better for the Q50, which scores 81 out of 100 points, at J.D. Power’s reliability ratings.

A proven chassis

Here's Why You Don't Need To Wait For An Updated Nissan Z Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 1009650
Proven reliability record
The 370Z, Q50, and Q60 all have proven reliabiity records, which spells good news for Z buyers
We already know that the Nissan Z is underpinned by a revised version of the 370Z platform.

The newly announcedNissan Z retains the same “Z34” chassis code and even the same wheelbase length of 2,550 mm (100.39 inches). Of course, we expect it to be stiffer than ever before, especially in the “Performance” trim, which adds thicker sway bars. But the main thing is that we are still getting that proven, well-balanced sports chassis we’ve come to adore from the 370Z.

A proven engine with a proven potential for tuning

Here's Why You Don't Need To Wait For An Updated Nissan Z Drivetrain High Resolution
- image 1009649
The first turbocharged Z since 1996
Just like the Z32, the new Z has a 3.0-liter twin-turbo V-6 - an engine that dates back to 2016

The (not so) new Nissan Z has a 3.0-liter twin-turbo V-6. It’s the VR30DDTT, which is shared with the Infiniti Q50 and Q60 Red Sport models.

It’s also the first Z-car to feature forced induction since the 300ZX Z32.

That car came out in 1989 and was produced until 1996, which means 25 years of not having forced induction in the Z-lineup.

2023 Nissan Z Specifications
Engine  3.0-liter, Twin-Turbo V-6
Horsepower 400 horses @ 6,400 rpm
Torque 350 pound-feet @ 1,600 - 5,600 rpm
Tranmission Six-speed manual or nine-speed automatic
Drive Layout Rear-wheel-drive
Price $40,000 (estimated)
Here's Why You Don't Need To Wait For An Updated Nissan Z Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 1009645
It also keeps the Z34 chassis code
Moreover, it has the same 2,550 mm wheelbase as the 370Z

The 3.0-liter twin-turbo V-6 engine has been around since 2016 and, so far, there haven’t been any unpleasant surprises. The engine has proven its reliability in the Q50 and Q60 models. Moreover, it’s also capable of making a lot more power with relatively minor mods, as seen in this ThatDudeInBlue video of a 525-horsepower Infiniti Q50.

Conclusion

Here's Why You Don't Need To Wait For An Updated Nissan Z Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 1009646
What’s your favorite thing about the new Z?
Swipe up for more useful details

While we can definitely expect an updated version of the Nissan Z, there is no reason not to go for the current one when it finally goes on sale next spring. It’s not the latest the automotive industry has to offer in terms of automotive technology but is this really a bad thing? Given, how artificial some of the new performance cars feel, not really.

The Nissan lineup and, by extension car enthusiasts, needed an old-school, relatively analog performance car. The Nissan Z offers a revised version of a proven chassis, a proven engine, and if the 370Z and Infiniti Q50 performance ratings are anything to go by (they are), a reliable package altogether.

Dim Angelov
Dim Angelov
Born in 1992, I come from a family of motoring enthusiasts. My passion for cars was awoken at the age of six, when I saw a Lamborghini Diablo SV in a magazine. After high school I earned a master’s degree in marketing and a Master of Arts in Media and Communications. Over the years, I’ve practiced and become skilled in precision driving and to date have test driven more than 250 cars across the globe. Over the years, I’ve picked up basic mechanical knowledge and have even taken part in the restoration of a 1964 Jaguar E-Type and an Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint. Lately, I’ve taken a fancy to automotive photography, and while modern cars are my primary passion, I also have a love for Asian Martial Arts, swimming, war history, craft beer, historical weapons, and car restoration. In time, I plan my own classic car restoration and hope to earn my racing certificate, after which I expect to establish my own racing team.  Read full bio
About the author

Related Articles

The New Nissan Z Was Kind Of Developed With Inspiration From the Toyota 86

The New Nissan Z400 vs Z Proto: What’s Different Between The Production-Spec Z And The Concept?

This Rendering Shows Us Exactly How The Nissan Z’s Front-End Will Look After It’s ’Fixed’

2023 Nissan Z - The Seventh-Gen Z Arrives With A V-6 Engine, 400 Horsepower, And A Manual Gearbox

What do you think?
Show Comments
Car Finder: