Honda

Honda Motor Company aka Honda is a Japanese multinational conglomerate that focuses mainly on manufacturing cars, motorcycles, and power equipment. Since 1959, Honda has been the world’s largest motorcycle manufacturer, as well as the world’s largest manufacturer of internal combustion engines by volume (14 million such units per year). Honda was also the first Japanese carmaker that came up with a luxury brand - that would be Acura, coined in 1986.

Honda was founded by Soichiro Honda, who started out as a mechanic, tuned cars and raced them during various events. The 1949 D-Type was the first motorcycle made by Honda from a frame and engine developed by the company. Honda’s first-ever automobile was, however, the T360 mini pickup truck, which made is market debut back in 1963. Today, Honda’s presence is sturdily felt in Europe but also in the U.S.

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Watch How a RWD Honda Civic Drift Car Comes to Life in Just 10 Minutes

Watch How a RWD Honda Civic Drift Car Comes to Life in Just 10 Minutes

From a beater to a drift monster!

Honda Civic conversions happen more frequently than most people realize. Most of these conversions usually involve turning the front-wheel-drive compact car to either rear-wheel-drive or all-wheel-drive, usually for reasons that involve one form of motorsport or another. These conversions aren’t difficult to do, and that probably explains why a lot of Civic conversions aren’t as well-thought-out as we’d expect them to be. They get the job done, sure, but the finished product still left a lot to be desired. Then there’s this Honda Civic conversion that comes to us by way of Jimmy Oakes of Oakes Garage. Not only was this build completely thought out, but the painstaking process and attention-to-detail is something to behold. To think this Civix started out as a beater and turned into a fully formed drift car is a testament to the work put in by Oakes and his peeps.

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Unique Car For Sale: Mid-Engined 1984 Honda Civic

Unique Car For Sale: Mid-Engined 1984 Honda Civic

A mid-engined, rear-wheel-drive Civic with a V-6 and a manual transmission can be yours

The Honda Civic is one of the most iconic cars that’s ever been built. The Civic has been around since the early 70s and is going strong even today. There’s no denying that the car has a loyal fan base, especially amongst enthusiasts, and one of the main reasons for is its mod-friendly nature. You pick any generation of the Honda Civic and you’ll find plenty of examples with bespoke customizations. One such example is this 1984 model.

This third-gen Civic has gone through numerous mods, and the biggest of them includes a heart transplant. It is one of the rare examples that was converted to a mid-engined layout around three decades back and it is now on sale on Bring-a-Trailer.com.

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2020 Honda Civic Hatchback by Mugen

2020 Honda Civic Hatchback by Mugen

You Can Now Make the Base Honda Civic Look a Lot Sportier Thanks to Mugen

When Mugen revealed its parts list for the 2020 Honda Civic Type R, it brought tons of carbon fiber, Alcantara, and some extreme exterior elements. For the most part, the same can be said for the standard Civic hatchback, but nothing is near as extreme. That is, arguably, a good thing, though, so let me explain to you what you can get for the base Civic hatch.

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This LS-Swapped and Turbocharged Honda S2000 Is the King of Tuner Vehicles

This LS-Swapped and Turbocharged Honda S2000 Is the King of Tuner Vehicles

From spunky to spitfire, this tuned Honda S2000 is proof why everyone loves the Japanese roadster

The Honda S2000 is one of the most desirable Japanese sports cars of its era. From its attractive looks to its peppy 2.0-liter inline-four cylinder engine that produced as much as 247 horsepower and 161 pound-feet of torque, the S22000 was as desirable as any sports roadster that hit the scene at the turn of the millennium. To this day, interest in the S2000 remains strong, in large part due to the seemingly limitless tuning possibilities it provides. Take this particular S2000, for example. It belongs to Mason Whitlow, an employee of tuning shop Holley, who bought his S2000 in standard form, only to have it upgraded into a complete monster on four wheels. It’s still a Honda S2000 in form, but everything else is entirely different. We’re not talking about a spunky 248-horsepower sports roadster anymore. This S2000 is now a 707-horsepower beast of epic proportions. At the very least, this build is a rolling advertisement, not only of Holley but, more importantly, of the many ways people have grown to love the Honda S2000.

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Weird Comparison: Honda Civic Type R vs Mini John Cooper Works GP

Weird Comparison: Honda Civic Type R vs Mini John Cooper Works GP

These two are not exactly direct rivals, but they’re both hot hatches priced similarly… hence this video

There’s no shortage of hot hatches on the market - in fact, the niche is becoming a rather cutthroat arena slowly but steadily. There’s also no doubt that two of its hottest representatives come from Honda and Mini, in the shape of the Civic Type R and the bonkers John Cooper Works GP. These two happen to make the subject of a recent comparo by Edmunds. Care to see which one came out on top?

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No Oil Test: Honda vs. Ford vs. Peugeot - Which Lasts Longer?

No Oil Test: Honda vs. Ford vs. Peugeot - Which Lasts Longer?

Driving without coolant and oil? Don’t try this at home kids!

As a driver, you should know that driving your car with the oil light on isn’t a good idea. The oil light usually pops on when the oil level drops or there’s insufficient oil pressure. Driving with the oil light on may cause extensive and expensive damage to the engine. But how long will a car’s engine run if you drain it of all coolant and oil? The folks over at Carwow tested this out on three different cars, a Ford Focus, a Peugeot 206, and a Honda Civic.

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Latest Videos:

Here's How the Retro-Styled Honda E Holds Up Against the Classic Civic

Here’s How the Retro-Styled Honda E Holds Up Against the Classic Civic

The Honda e has future classic written all over it

Honda likes to play a lot with heritage when it comes to what its cars look like. The Japanese brand also did quite a neat job in feeling the recent rise in awareness and love for classic cars and cleverly styled the Honda e EV accordingly.

We must admit, seeing the nippy electric car next to the original Honda Civic not only makes us want the EV even more, but also realize just how many retrolicious cues went into it in the first place.

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Honda's Latest Trademark Hints at The Company Fighting The Ford Bronco and Jeep Wrangler?

Honda’s Latest Trademark Hints at The Company Fighting The Ford Bronco and Jeep Wrangler?

Honda seems to have finally woken up from a deep slumber to enter the off-roading segment

The latest chapter of the Bronco vs Wrangler story has a new twist. A rather unfamiliar automaker in this segment has decided to step up and challenge these two Americans.

According to CarBuzz, Honda has filed for the “Trailsport” trademark that suggests the automaker wants a share of this ever-growing pie. The trademark doesn’t explicitly specify that it’s for off-road purposes, but it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out its intended use. Will this serve as a ‘passport’ for Honda to fly into the off-road segment?

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If You Want a New Honda Civic Coupe, You Need To Move Quick

If You Want a New Honda Civic Coupe, You Need To Move Quick

Honda has decided to kill off the Civic coupe, announces 11th-gen model for 2022

The Honda Civic – it’s a good, reliable, efficient, and even a sporty car, but there’s one model that just isn’t meant to live beyond 2020. Honda is busy preparing to showcase the 11th-generation Civic in 2021 as a 2022 model, and now we’ve received confirmation that while the Hatchback and Sedan body styles will carry over, the coupe is officially dead in the water in the U.S. market. This will mark the first time in decades that we won’t have access to a new, two-door Civic. Times are certainly changing, but there’s some good news too.

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How Would You Feel About a 400-Horsepower, AWD Honda Civic Type R?

How Would You Feel About a 400-Horsepower, AWD Honda Civic Type R?

As good as this sounds, we’re still waiting for official word from Honda

The redesigned 2020 Honda Type R is still a fresh addition to the Japanese brand’s lineup but rumors about the next-gen Type R have been swirling on the interwebs for quite some time now.

Those familiar with what’s been written and predicted about the new generation Honda Type R know that the hot hatch has been touted with every possible powertrain: a hybrid one, an all-electric setup, and a pure-ICE configuration.

Basically, we know nothing about what’s going to motivate the new Type R yet a rumor from Japan takes the cake in terms of outrageousness.

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It Looks Like The 2022 Honda Civic Type R Won't Be Hybrid After All

It Looks Like The 2022 Honda Civic Type R Won’t Be Hybrid After All

Honda is likely to go traditional on the new Civic Type R, which is good news in and of itself

Honda’s 306-horsepower, 295-pound-feet hot hatch isn’t that long in the tooth so a replacement might take a couple of years to spring into reality, but there’s already talk about what the current Type R’s successor might bring to the table. And as things look right now, a hybrid powertrain isn’t in the cards.

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Splitting the Difference: 2003 Honda Civic Type R vs. 2020 Honda Civic Type R

Splitting the Difference: 2003 Honda Civic Type R vs. 2020 Honda Civic Type R

We’ll just call this the VTEC Wars

You know how they say ’respect and honor your elders?’ Well, we can all agree that Honda is doing just that with the Civic and in particular with the Civic Type R.

The nifty hot hatch has remained true to its origins - albeit switching to turbocharging along the way - but that original Type R ethos is still present in modern Type Rs. Don’t believe us? Check out Throttle House’s latest video.

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What is the Cheapest Honda?

The cheapest Honda is the Fit. In the U.S., the Honda Fit starts at $16,190. If we are to also consider the Old Continent here, then the cheapest Honda is the Jazz, which is nothing else than the Fit’s twin aimed at the European market. In Germany, the Honda Jazz starts at €17,290.

What is the Sportiest Honda?

The sportiest Honda is the NSX, also known as the Acura NSX.Honda’s range spearhead uses three electric motors and an ICE (internal combustion engine) to crank out 573 horsepower and 476 pound-feet of torque. Besides the spiced up powertrain, the NSX has large front and rear stabilizer bars and a performance-oriented chassis that’s benefited from Honda’s racing know-how. The internal combustion engine is a 3.5-liter V-6 mounted behind the seats. If we are to ignore the NSX, then the sportiest Honda is the Civic Type R.

What is the Most Popular Honda?

The most popular Honda is the CR-V, if we are to look at sales figures. The SUV reached 379,013 customers in 2018, after in 2017 Honda pushed no less than 377,895 CR-V units. The only two models that shyly come closer to that performance are the Civic (325,760 units sold in 2018 and 377,286 units sold in 2017) and the Accord (291,071 units sold in 2018 and 322,655 units sold in 2017).

What is the Most Expensive Honda?

The most expensive Honda in the US of A is the Civic Type R. It starts at $36,300 and relies on a four-cylinder engine displacing 2 liters and pushing 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque between 2,500 and 4,500 rpm, with a redline positioned at 7,000 rpm. The Civic Type R is also the most expensive Honda available in Europe. In Germany, for example, the Type R starts at €37,590 and is followed closely by the €32,790 CR-V Hybrid.

What is the Fastest Honda?

The fastest Honda, if we are to ignore the NSX and the brand’s motorcycles, is the Civic Type R. The souped-up hot hatch can sprint from 0 to 60 mph in 4.9 seconds and reach a top speed of 169 mph. It can also clear the quarter mile in 13.5 seconds at 108 mph. Now, for the sake of the argument, the Honda NSX dispatches the 0-60 mph interval in three seconds and can reach a top speed of 191 mph.

Are Honda Cars Reliable?

Honda cars are very reliable. Most of that is due to the excellent quality control the carmaker employs, but they’re designed with reliability in mind in the first place. In 2013, Honda was ranked first for engine reliability by WarrantyDirect - with a failure rate of just 1 in 344. That’s around 0.29 percent. In 2015, Honda made it to the top of overall reliability lists compiled by WarrantyDirect and What Car? thanks to an index of 41. Moreover, ReliabilityIndex places Honda in second place (after Daihatsu) with an index of 42.