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Teen Dies After Being Pinned by the Third Row Seat of a 2004 Honda Odyssey

Teen Dies After Being Pinned by the Third Row Seat of a 2004 Honda Odyssey

His life could’ve been saved if other people did their jobs

A 16-year-old boy in Cincinnati, Ohio died after getting pinned behind the third-row seat of a 2004 Honda Odyssey. The young man, identified as Kyle Plush, died of asphyxia due to chest compression, even after calling 911 not once but twice. The death has been ruled accidental, but there are still plenty of questions that need to be answered behind the circumstances of his death, particularly the way responders handled his calls for help.

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The Hoonigan Crew And Bisimoto Prove The Fix For Uncool Is More Horsepower: Video

The Hoonigan Crew And Bisimoto Prove The Fix For Uncool Is More Horsepower: Video

Is your brain ready for the Bisimoto Engineering Minivan?

Not too long ago, minivan ownership was akin to admitting defeat, a white flag waved in the interest of replacing fun with practicality. Luckily, that’s not always the case any more. Just ask Bisi Ezerioha, founder of Bisimoto Engineering, who built the above-featured 1,000-horse Honda Odyssey. “I started a young family, and I love cars, I love speed,” Bisi says.” So, I’m a guy who loves speed, loves to go fast, build crazy horsepower, but I have a family now, so what do I do? Build a minivan.” Makes sense to us.

Bisi cut his teeth in the world of speed by setting numerous records in FWD Honda drag racers. These days, he’s running one of the most badass tuner shops in the country – Bisimoto Engineering, based out of Ontario, California. You may have heard the name before. Bisimoto Engineering is responsible for some of the most exciting builds to hit the scene in recent memory, including a slew of jaw-dropping Porsches (here’s one example, a Steve McQueen tribute). Or there’s this 1,000-horsepower Hyundai Santa Fe that graced SEMA last year. With a resume like that, a four-figure Odyssey looks like business as usual. At about just under 20 minutes, the video is kinda long, but worth it to see this slammed people mover killing tires at Hoonigan HQ.

Continue reading for the full story.

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2018 Honda Odyssey

2018 Honda Odyssey

The Odyssey could finish what the Pacifica started in the minivan market

The Honda Odyssey was born in a time of need during Japan’s economic crisis in the 1990s. As such, the first-generation model was much smaller than the model that we know today. That model lasted just long enough for Honda to build a U.S.-based production facility and the Odyssey has been getting better ever since. Each generation of Honda’s resident minivan has been short lived, with the longest being the current and fourth-generation which will run through the 2017 model year. For 2018, Honda is introducing the fifth-generation model that includes aggressive exterior styling with LED lighting, powered rear doors, and an evolution of the “lightning bolt” beltline that has been a subject of controversy in the past. On the inside, the new Odyssey benefits from an all-new infotainment system, camera monitoring system, digital instrument cluster, and a new take on age-old problem of accessing that third row of seats. It gets even better yet, however, as Honda also saw fit to provide more power from its resident 3.5-liter V-6 – effectively raising output to 280 horsepower – and two new automatic transmissions that will help put the Odyssey at the top of its class in the fuel economy department.

So, with an updated and aggressive design, new innovative technology, and a 32 horsepower increase over the outgoing model, the new Odyssey is ready to hit showrooms and bring more stability to the once crumbling foundation of the minivan segment. But, regardless of this new design, Honda is still showing up late to the party as Chrysler redesigned the Pacifica (the Odyssey’s main competition) for the 2017 model year and it’s already established a pretty decent foothold. So, does the new Odyssey have what it takes to compete with models like the Pacifica, or even the aging Toyota Sienna? Well, I spent some time with the new Odyssey when it made its long-awaited debut at the Detroit Auto Show, so let’s dive on in to take a better look and see if we can come up with a good answer to that question.

Update 5/30/2017: Honda has finally announced prices for the all-new Honda Odyssey. It starts out just below the $30k mark at $29,990. Check out the prices section below for detailed pricing on each trim level and what each trim level includes as standard equipment.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2018 Honda Odyssey.

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2015 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite - Driven

2015 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite - Driven

The Honda Odyssey began its life way back in 1995 when Honda leaped into the minivan realm with its Accord-powered family hauler. The Odyssey hit its second generation in 1999 when Honda completely redesigned the body, replaced the swinging rear doors with more minivan-like sliding doors, and installed a class-leading, 3.5-liter V-6. The 2005 model year marked the debut of the third-gen Honda people carrier, as the automaker redesigned the van yet again and retuned its V-6 to produce 244 ponies. In 2011, Honda redesigned the Odyssey once again, ushering in the fourth generation, giving it a fuel-economy boost, smoothing out the body and adding in a few extra optional goodies, like an available chill box and rear-entertainment system. As we head into 2015, little has changed with the fourth-generation Odyssey.

I recently spent a week lumbering around in the range-topping Touring Elite trim of this massive minivan, and I found some good things and some not-so-good things about it. Being a sports car guy, testing the Odyssey required me to forget all the things I love about cars and focus on whether this big Honda was a great appliance for those who have more than 2.5 children or not?

Click past the jump to read my full review on the 2015 Odyssey Touring Elite to find out.

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2014 Honda Odyssey

2014 Honda Odyssey

For 2014, Honda is refreshing the Odyssey with some mild exterior tweaks, new safety systems, a new center stack design for the infotainment options and offers the world’s first built-in shop vacuum on top-spec Touring Elite trim. Many of the other cool benefits are limited to the Touring Elite spec as well, but the core package of responsive performance, extreme durability and family friendliness continues unchanged for 2014.

The Honda Odyssey is one of the top two minivans in the sales charts, often jostling for position in this declining market segment with the Toyota Sienna. Both the Honda and Toyota vans are actually pretty pricey in their top configurations, leaving the value segment to the Dodge and Chrysler vans, whose combined sales dwarf the Honda and Toyota.

For people who’ve accepted that they need a van, there’s little loyalty at play and these family audiences are happy to jump ship when a better entry comes along. So far, no one has topped the Honda Odyssey since 1999 in terms of total feature count or buyer satisfaction. One could even say that the Honda is the most premium player in the segment, following the discontinuation of the Mercedes-Benz R-class.

The exterior tweaks are not going to cause a rush on showrooms, but are enough to subtly refine the Odyssey’s style in the face of the more-flamboyant Toyota Sienna design. The new 2014 models arrive in July at Honda dealers nationwide.

Click past the jump for the full review of the 2014 Honda Odyssey, including the new HondaVac and HondaHair system on the top Odyssey Touring Elite models.

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