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Poor Guy Has Rims Stolen from His Honda Accord Twice in One Week

Poor Guy Has Rims Stolen from His Honda Accord Twice in One Week

Hopefully, third time is NOT a charm for this unlucky couple

There’s bad luck, and there’s really bad luck. A couple from Prince George’s County in Maryland found themselves on the short end of the stick when a thief stole all four tires from their Honda Accord not once, but twice. The first incident occurred on November 28 when surveillance footage showed a man getting out of his car and jacking the tires from the Accord before it leaving it on bricks. To prevent the incident from happening again, the husband of the owner of the car, identified as Anthony Greer, decided to install a Viper alarm system with a tilt sensor on the Accord. Turns out, the two safety devices weren’t enough to prevent the crime from happening again. Exactly a week later on December 5, the thief managed to steal the Accord’s new set of tires after breaking the wheel locks and leaving the car on the same type of bricks.

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HondaLens Augmented Reality - The Future of the Dealership Experience

HondaLens Augmented Reality - The Future of the Dealership Experience

There’s no going back from virtual reality as Honda pioneers a new level of dealership engagement

Honda has high hopes for the all-new 2018 Accord, so it’s taking the car’s dealership experience to a whole new level with a new feature called HondaLens. The augmented reality (AR) feature puts prospective customers in a unique position of seeing the Accord and its features in a whole new light, literally and figuratively. The proprietary system made its debut at the 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show in grand fashion. Those in attendance were given an opportunity to peak into the history of one of Honda’s best-selling models before diving deep into the array of features that the tenth-generation Accord has at its disposal.

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2020 Honda Ridgeline Type R

2020 Honda Ridgeline Type R

Is the Ridgeline a good candidate for a Type R edition?

Honda waited years before bringing the Civic Type R to the U.S., but now that it’s here, our lusting and longing for performance variants of Hondas is left lonely. That got us thinking what else Honda could “Type R-ify.” Considering high-performance pickups are all the rage these days (though more for the off-road set), we figured the Ridgeline is a perfect candidate for a hotter engine, upgraded suspension, and some heavily bolstered racing seats. Why not?

Alright, we know – Elon Musk has a better chance of landing a Tesla-branded rover on Mars than we have of convincing Honda to build a Type R version of the Ridgeline. Honda purists would shout sacrilege at a Ridgeline Type R and haters of Honda’s pickup would laugh even harder at this “non-pickup.” That doesn’t matter, though; we’d still love to see a high-performance version of the second-generation Ridgeline. Perhaps it could even reignite the sport truck niche, twisting Ford’s arm to bring back the F-150 Lightning, Chevy the Silverado SS, and GMC the Syclone. How cool would that be? So what might a Honda Ridgeline Type R include? Read on for the speculation.

Continue reading for more information.

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2020 Honda Odyssey Type R

2020 Honda Odyssey Type R

The Minivan we so desperately need but will probably never get. Please Honda? Pretty Please?

There’s no harder transition in the world than for a car guy to move away from his prized bachelor car to daily drive a mom-mobile, aka the dreaded minivan. So, what happens when you want the best of both worlds? Well, you convince Honda to build you a Honda Odyssey Type R. Is it crazy? Sure. But are you going to tell me you would pass up an Odyssey Type R to drive a Chrysler Pacifica, Toyota Sienna, Kia Sedona, or a Mercedes Metris? I doubt it, and you know why? Because this thing is intense in all the right ways. You get all of the Type R goodies, including things like the Championship White paint, Type R wheels and body kit, and even the classic Type R red accents inside. But, what will power a beast like this? Well, we’ll discuss that in a bit.

So here we are, talking about something as crazy as an Odyssey Type R. All the goodness of the ultimate people hauler paired with the aggressiveness, style, and clout of the Type R badge, plus more than enough power to keep you from sacrificing your manhood on days when you have to tote the family around. So with that said, let’s dive in and speculate a bit about the Honda Odyssey Type R and why Honda should greenlight a project like this. You know it will appeal to the tuner and gearhead in all of us.

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2019 Honda Accord Type R

2019 Honda Accord Type R

Because why not?

There’s no denying that Honda has been pretty stingy when it comes to the Type R badge and the U.S. Market. Over the years, U.K., Euro, and Japanese markets always seemed to get the best that Honda had to offer, with the Type R badge being applied to the first-generation Acura NSX, Acura Integra, the Honda Accord and, of course, the Honda Civic. Of all these, the only models we saw come to the U.S. were the NSX Type R and the Integra Type R, both sporting Acura Badges, and we finally got the Civic Type R for the 2017 model year. With that in mind, it’s been a while since the world got a Type R version of the Accord, so we decided to render up was a U.S.-Spec Accord Type R would look like. Highlights of the build would include more aggressive fascias out front with Type R specific styling to go with plenty of Type R goodness inside. There would, of course, be an improved output over the range-topping model’s 252 ponies, but how that power will come to be is another story. Other necessities include a stiffer suspension, manual transmission, tuned-out exhaust, and a lower ride height.

On the plus side, all of the necessary prerequisites are already in play. The new Accord is pretty sporty on its own, so a more aggressive look should be easily welcomed. But, with the range-topping models of the Accord already sporting the detuned version of the Civic Type R’s 2.0-liter four-cylinder, it won’t take much to get some extra power to the wheels. Even more intriguing is the fact that Accord Sport models with the 2.0-liter can be equipped with a six-speed manual if you check the right option box, so you’ll be able to forgo dealing with that new 10-speed auto gearbox. With all of that in mind, let’s talk a little about the Accord Type R’s history and then take a good look at our rendering. Are you excited? I sure am. Let’s get to it…

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Latest Los Angeles Auto Show:

The 2018 Honda Accord Gives Us Some Mixed Feelings

The 2018 Honda Accord Gives Us Some Mixed Feelings

It’s pretty good, but I’m not so sure about that front end...

The Honda Accord has a long, illustrious history that goes all the way back to 1976 when it started out life in Japan as a compact car. Over the years, it’s been through a total of nine generation changes, effectively jumping segments twice, from compact to mid-size and, more recently, to full-size. The most recent generation kicked off in 2013, but that was before Honda really got its act together, so this generation is destined to be short-lived, with 2018 ushering in the 10th-gen Accord. Highlights include two new engines, a 10-speed automatic transmission, an all-new body design, all-new chassis design, and the full suite of Honda’s safety and driver-assistance technology as standard equipment. It has more ultra-high-strength steel than any other Honda on the market today and features a tech-savvy cabin that has an almost-German look matched with a rather busy layout.

Inside and under the skin, the Accord has gone through a complete transformation while the exterior’s new look is more evolutionary than revolutionary. One could even argue that the teasers were a bit misleading when it comes to the lesser models, whose front end just looks cheap. Higher-end models look a little better up front, but the overall look is a little risky in a segment that’s got cars like the new Toyota Camry ready to reign supreme. Want to learn more about the new Accord and get a better look at what it offers for 2018? Keep on reading for a quick breakdown.

Continue reading for more.

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2017 Honda Accord Sport Special Edition

2017 Honda Accord Sport Special Edition

If you were thinking about an entry-level LX, the new Sport might convince you to step up

The 2017 Honda Accord just hit showrooms on June 20, 2016, and with it came a new trim level dubbed the Sport Special Edition. As such, the new trim sits on the lower side of the spectrum, taking up the spot between the entry-level Accord LX and the Accord EX, so it’s not a trim you’re going to have to pay a fortune to position yourself in either. With that said, the Sport SE comes in three different versions – the first and cheapest comes with a six-speed manual, the mid-level includes a CVT transmission, and the third comes with a CVT and the Honda Sensing Safety Package. Don’t let its position in the Accord hierarchy fool you; this lower trim level actually comes pretty well-equipped.

Jeff Conrad, the Vice President for Honda division, said, “ [The] Accord continues to set the bar in its class with customers making it the top retail selling car in America for three years running. We’re proud to offer an expanded lineup with the new Sport Special Edition and the 2017 Accord Hybrid as we continue to advance Accord’s position as a true benchmark in its class, offering an unbeatable combination of style, efficiency, fun-to-drive performance and connectivity in the midsize sedan segment.”

With that said, don’t get your hopes up thinking there are any drastic differences to the body or anything. On the outside, the general look remains the same, but that just means it has a good foundation. And, with the Accord’s 2.4-liter engine, it has decent power blended with decent fuel economy. There are eight exterior colors to choose from but just one interior color. So, let’s take a closer look at the new Accord Sport SE and see what all the hype is about.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2017 Honda Accord Sport Special Edition.

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2016 Honda Accord Coupe

2016 Honda Accord Coupe

The 2016 Honda Accord Sedan is one of just a couple of cars that defines what a mainstream midsized car is. It is a car that is aggressively unaggressive, designed to be enjoyable but not to push any boundaries that might limit its commercial appeal. It’s the "Everybody Loves Raymond" of cars. But Honda also makes a coupe version of the Accord, and since Toyota doesn’t make a coupe version of the Accord’s mortal enemy, the Camry, the Accord coupe doesn’t have as much competition as its sedan sibling. Honda can therefore take more risks with the coupe and build something more interesting, or at least something that looks more interesting.

The Accord got a facelift for 2016, and this is most noticeable on the coupe. Mechanically, not too much has changed, but that isn’t surprising for a mid-cycle refresh of a hugely popular car. The changes are mostly in the styling, which was unobjectionable but a bit dull in the old car, and has become much more aggressive in the 2016. It might not offer performance that will rip your face off, but a coupe with an available 278-horsepower V-6 and a six-speed manual transmission is still more fun than 90 percent of the cars on the road.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Honda Accord Coupe.

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2016 Honda Accord

2016 Honda Accord

Honda has pulled the covers off its newest, most technologically advanced version of the popular Accord. Heavily refreshed for the 2016 model year, the Accord now boasts an updated look inside and out, with a host of new features and gadgets. Most of the mechanicals carry over from the 2015 car; the Accord still offers two stout engine options fitted with a manual transmission, a conventional six-speed automatic, or a CVT. Honda seems set on shaking the Accord’s bland reputation as a family sedan with this refresh, and from the looks of things, bland is nowhere to be seen.

The new Accord enjoyed its reveal party in the fitting location of Silicon Valley in California. The technology epicenter is home to companies like Google and Apple – both of whom now have their latest car-centered tech inside the Accord. Yep, both Apple CarPlay and Google’s Android Auto are present. The mobile device-compatible software integration now allows users to connect their iPhone or Android devices to the Accord’s infotainment system and display a condensed version of their phones’ interfaces.

Of course, Honda Sensing is offered. It now comes with Collision Mitigation Braking System, Forward Collision Warning, Lane Keeping Assist, Road Departure Mitigation with Lane Departure Warning, and Adaptive Cruise Control. All trim levels can be optioned with Honda Sensing, while the range-topping Touring model gets it as standard.

The Accord has been one of the best selling sedans for decades, but will the new improvements be enough to keep its position on the leader board?

Updated 08/11/2015: Honda announced prices for the 2016 Accord sedan, which will go on sale later in the summer. Prices will range from $22,105 for the LX with the six-speed manual transmission to $34,580 for the Touring V-6 version with the six-speed automatic.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Honda Accord.

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Nissan, Honda And Toyota Will Go Turbo

Nissan, Honda And Toyota Will Go Turbo

As emissions and fuel-economy standards become more stringent, many of the world’s automakers have been busy adding turbochargers to their engine packages. And while the majority of American and European makers are already quite turbo-heavy, the big three Japanese brands (Nissan, Honda and Toyota) don’t offer many boosted vehicles. The reason? It simply hasn’t been necessary until now.

Speaking to Automotive News, Ed Kim, Vice President of Industry Analysis at AutoPacific, said that Japanese carmakers didn’t need to adopt widespread turbocharging because they had “less to prove to the buying public,” offering high efficiency without the technology.

“The Japanese were able to afford to not be at the absolute cutting edge of powertrain technology for a few years,” Kim said.

However, as older internal-combustion technology begins to reach its limits, Nissan, Honda and Toyota will seek the integration of turbochargers on a broader scale over the next five years or so. 

Honda seems to be the most eager in this regard, bringing in a boosted 1.5-liter four-cylinder for the new Civic and later versions of the Accord and CR-V. These three models accounted for 1 million sales and 68 percent of Honda’s volume last year, and consequently contributed heavily towards the automaker’s emissions and fuel-economy regulations compliance levels.

Toyota will offer a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder as a replacement for the V-6 used in models like the Camry and Lexus IS. However, its existing naturally aspirated four-cylinders will remain, instead gaining other efficiency-increasing internal combustion technologies and the use of continuously variable transmissions (CVTs).

Finally, Nissan will also utilize more CVTs, and while more turbos are slated to arrive sometime in the future, they are expected to appear more slowly than those coming from Honda and Toyota. Current forced-induction Nissan products include the Juke and GT-R.

Continue reading for the full story.

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2015 Honda Pilot Special Edition

2015 Honda Pilot Special Edition

Facelifted for the 2012 model year, the Honda Pilot SUV remained basically unchanged for 2014, keeping its boring, highly criticized exterior looks. Now if you were hoping that will change for 2015, then you’d better start relaxing those fingers, because the boxy, three-row SUV is holding onto its current specifications for one more year.

There is a notable change in the Pilot lineup, however, coming in the shape of a brand-new Special Edition trim. Sounds familiar? It should, because we’re talking about the same strategy Honda pushed with the aging Ridgeline pickup truck last year.

Essentially a well-equipped model fitted with a couple of exclusive features, the Pilot SE resides between the EX and the EX-L trims and can be had in both two-wheel and four-wheel-drive configurations. The Special Edition benefits from the same 3.5-liter V-6 engine as the rest of the Pilot lineup, meaning it can carry up to eight people and tow up to 4,500 pounds with input from 250 horsepower and 253 pound-feet of torque.

In charge with transferring the power to the wheels is a five-speed automatic transmission with Grade Logic Control. The unit can be paired with Honda’s VTM four-wheel-drive system for AWD capability. Helping the SUV cope with tougher terrain is a fully independent suspension with a MacPherson strut at the front and a multi-link unit with trailing arm to the rear.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Honda Pilot Special Edition.

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2014 Honda Accord Touring - Driven

2014 Honda Accord Touring - Driven

The Honda Accord has been around for what seems like forever, and it has undergone more changes that I don’t care to count. After a nice redesign just a year ago, the Accord carries into the 2014 model year with no changes at all. I got my hands on a range-topping Touring version of the 2014 Accord, which had just about every gadget and gizmo imaginable in a mainstream, midsize sedan.

The Accord has long had one of the most boring cabins in its segment, and the redesign takes care of some blandness, but it remains pretty blah. Besides the sleepy design, the Accord Touring’s cabin was very nicely equipped, thank to standard leather, 360-watt audio system, blind-spot camera, Bluetooth and heated seats.

Under the hood, Honda continues with its tried and true 3.5-liter V-6 that nets the sedan just under 300 horsepower. That’s decent power for a midsize sedan, but automakers are now moving toward smaller, turbocharged engines to increase fuel economy, but maintain power output, and Honda is still missing this boat.

So how does the Accord stack up to the likes of the Hyundai Sonata and Toyota Camry?

Read my full Driven review after the jump to find out.

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