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Watch a 1500-Horsepower, AWD Honda Civic (Kinda) Jolt to 60 MPH in just 1.1 Seconds

Watch a 1500-Horsepower, AWD Honda Civic (Kinda) Jolt to 60 MPH in just 1.1 Seconds

One point one seconds in case you thought that was a typo

Alright. What’s the first thing that pops into mind when you hear the words Honda Civic? Nippy driving? Reliability? The Type R? A teenager’s car? Uber? Well, to us, it’s all of the above but to Norris Prayoonto and P-Racing, the Civic is proper dragster material. A downright scary one.

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Video: Check Out This Honda Integra DC2 Type R Screaming Up a Hillclimb

Video: Check Out This Honda Integra DC2 Type R Screaming Up a Hillclimb

An H-badge icon in its element

There’s something special about a tuned Honda going flat out on a race course. The sound of the four-cylinder’s soaring rpm’s is enough to make the hair on the back of your neck stand up, and when properly sorted, the speed these machines can achieve is undeniable. Such is the case with the lightened ‘Teggy Type R featured in this 3-minute, 15-second video from Hillclimb Monsters.

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2018 Honda Civic Type R TCR

2018 Honda Civic Type R TCR

The most extreme Civic Type R, but it’s not road legal

The Honda Civic Type R TCR is a purpose-built racing car for the TCR formula. It is based on the FK7/8 Civic Type R and is built by JAS Motorsport. The car, with all of its 340-horsepower, won the inaugural TCR title in the Pirelli World Challenge this year with driver Ryan Eversley and team RealTime Racing.

Touring car racing has seen many sets of regulations come and go, some more successful than others. We all remember the glorious Group A touring cars such as the BMW M3 (E30) Sport Evolution, the Mercedes-Benz 190E AMG Evo II or the Nissan Skyline GT-R R32. Then there was the Super Touring formula which took the world by storm and became a truly global phenomena spawning regional series all across the globe, including North America where the North-American Touring Car Championship was held for two seasons.

Now, there’s a new platform that’s at the peak of its popularity. It’s called TCR, and it was conceived by Marcello Lotti, head of World Sporting Consulting, as a cost-effective option to the TC1 cars that were used in the World Touring Car Championship (WTCC).

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