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Hyundai Ioniq

2017 Hyundai Ioniq

2017 Hyundai Ioniq
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Is it good enough to give the almighty Prius a run for its money?

Despite the number of hybrid vehicles introduced over the last dozen years or so, none have really been able to take too big of a bite out of the sales figures for the poster child of hybrids, the Toyota Prius. Hyundai looks to change all of that with its own dedicated hybrid hatchback. The big news is that the model, dubbed Ioniq, also feature an all-electric drivetrain as in addition to the more familiar hybrid and plug-in hybrid setups you get with the Prius. As for the name, the company says it references "elements of its creation." An ion is an electrically-charged atom, linking to the car’s "clever combination of electrified powertrains," while the second part of the name references it unique place in the Hyundai lineup. Finally, the "Q" is depicted in the vehicle’s logo "as a visual breakthrough, acknowledging the fresh new approach of this advanced, low-emission model."

Granted, the Ioniq comes with a lot of fancy words, but the new nameplate does have at least one thing to brag about: it’s the first production car to offer hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and electric drivetrain in the same exterior package. Having unveiled the Ioniq to local media at its Namyang R&D Center in South Korea, Hyundai displayed the car at both the Geneva Motor Show and New York Auto Show in 2016. Will it have what it takes to give the popular Toyota Prius a run for its money? Find out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2017 Hyundai Ioniq.

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Latest Hyundai Ioniq news and reviews:

2017 Hyundai HyperEconiq Ioniq

2017 Hyundai HyperEconiq Ioniq

The Korean hybrid just got more aggressive

In 2017, Korean brand Hyundai unveiled its highly anticipated competitor for the Toyota Prius. It’s called the Ioniq; it features a sporty design and a premium interior, and a drivetrain that rivals that of the Prius in terms of performance and efficiency. Hyundai also launched an all-electric version, but very soon we may also see a performance-oriented model hit the market. However, the latter may not come from Hyundai, but from tuning company Bisimoto Engineering, which just unveiled a souped-up Ioniq ahead of the 2017 SEMA Show.

While this tuning brand makes a living from developing and selling aftermarket updates for a range of cars, including the Dodge Viper and Porsche 911, it’s quite famous for rolling spectacular concept cars at every SEMA show in recent years. And the U.S.-based brand has made a passion for Hyundai, preparing beefed-up versions of just about every important model made by the Korean company. This year will be the year of the Ioniq, which was turned into an innovative concept that integrates "the best hypermiling, economy and friction technologies" for enhanced fuel economy and drivability. Find out more about it below.

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2017 Hyundai Ioniq - Driven

2017 Hyundai Ioniq - Driven

Pay attention, Prius

Toyota Prius, you’re on notice: The Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid is here, and it’s arguably doing this whole hybrid, fuel-efficient family car thing better than you.

The Prius has had this market sewn-up for over a decade now. There’s been competition, but it’s been limited. Considering gasoline has been “cheap” here in the States for most of that time, it’s easy to understand why automakers haven’t been eager to challenge Toyota with a compact hybrid hatchback. After all, compact cars aren’t the hottest-selling things in truck-and-SUV-loving ‘Merica, so getting folks to pay a little more for a hybrid electric powertrain in a compact car can be a hard sell.

So while other compacts like the Ford Focus, Nissan Sentra, Kia Forte, and yes, even Toyota’s own Corolla and Hyundai’s own Elantra fought it out for a piece of a shrinking pie, the Prius more or less had the super-efficient niche all to itself.

All three versions of the Prius — compact Liftback, subcompact “C”, and midsize “V” — sold 136,632 copies combined in 2016 — down 48,162 from the year prior. (Toyota didn’t provide a breakdown of individual Prius model sales in its 2016 year-end sales stats.) By comparison, the brand’s Corolla sedan sold 360,483 copies in the same year, and that’s not counting the 17,727 copies of the closely related Corolla (née Scion) iM hatchback. But to show you how much we ‘Mericans love trucks and cheap gas, Ford sold more gas-guzzling F-Series pickup trucks in 2016 than all of the above combined — 820,799 trucks total.

Into this fuel-swilling American marketplace steps Hyundai with its first dedicated compact hybrid, the Ioniq, designed specifically to compete with the Prius Liftback. Even with the Prius getting a much-needed total redesign this year, there are things I like better about the Ioniq. First and foremost: its design.

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2016 Hyundai Autonomous Ioniq Concept

2016 Hyundai Autonomous Ioniq Concept

A concept that previews the company’s first autonomous drive vehicle

The Hyundai Ioniq was unveiled to the public in early 2016, after a couple of years of speculation and spy shots of camouflaged test cars. Developed to compete against the popular Toyota Prius, the Ioniq sports a modern design that combines the company’s latest styling language with a few unique design features of its own. Available in both hybrid and plug-in hybrid versions at launch, the Ioniq also got an all-electric variant in 2017. At the 2016 Los Angeles Auto Show, Hyundai confirmed that the EV will also get an autonomous system and showcased a concept car featuring the new technology. Essentially identical to the hybrid inside and out, the Autonomous Ioniq is one of the few self-driving cars in development to have a hidden LiDAR system in its front bumper instead of on the roof and Hyundai says that its goal is to keep the self-driving systems as simple as possible. This will be accomplished by using the Ioniq’s Smart Cruise Control radar, along with its Lane Keep Assist cameras and integrating them with LiDAR technology.

Hyundai also announced that it’s developing its own autonomous vehicle operating system, which will result in a low-cost platform that can be installed in future Hyundai models that should be more affordable. A display-only model in L.A., the Autonomous Ioniq was further showcased at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January 2017, where two cars were "driven" on the streets of Las Vegas. There’s no specific timetable as to when the production car will arrive, but Hyundai is already testing three autonomous Ioniqs and two autonomous Tucson Fuel Cell SUVs at its research and development center in Namyang, South Korea. Early 2018 sounds like a reasonable launch date.

Continue reading to learn more about the Hyundai Autonomous IONIQ concept.

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Hyundai Unveils Autonomous Ioniq Concept In Los Angeles

Hyundai Unveils Autonomous Ioniq Concept In Los Angeles

Self-driving Hyundais will soon be cruising the Vegas Boulevards. Up for taking a ride?

The Hyundai Ioniq first made its debut in Hyundai’s home country of South Korea but in January of 2016 as a hybrid. Since then, it has spawned two other versions – an all-electric model and a plug-in hybrid model that doubled a 1.6-liter four-banger with a 45 kW electric motor. As the 2016 L.A. Auto Show kicked off, Hyundai grew its Ioniq lineup yet again with the introduction of Autonomous Ioniq Concept. OF course, as the Concept name implies, it’s not a real production model the Ioniq triplets that we’re already familiar with, but it is a firm representation of what the model will be when level 5 autonomy is perfected and legal for use on public roads. The biggest news about this concept is that the LIDAR system used to identify the car’s surrounds is stashed away and hidden inside the bumper instead of sitting on the roof. But, there’s more to it than that, so let’s talk a little more about it.

The whole purpose of the concept is to showcase an autonomous system that would be safe and easy to transition to from regular or semi-autonomous vehicles. As such, all autonomous controls have been built into the existing systems that are used on the production models. The system works by the use of a forward facing radar to detect the speed of objects and help with route planning, a three-camera system that picks up lane markings, traffic signals and the proximity of pedestrians, and a GMS antenna that can be used to determine the exact location of the vehicle just about anywhere. It also uses high-def mapping information from MnSoft that keeps the onboard systems apprised of road grade and curvature, lane width, and indication data. Finally, there’s a separate radar from blind spot detection to make sure a basic lane change doesn’t end up in disaster.

The production variants of the Ioniq already offer features found on other models like automatic emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, and lane-departure warning, among other things. So, this concept quite literally showcases what the next evolution of Hyundai’s autonomous future holds.

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Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid Sets Speed Record At Bonneville Salt Flats

Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid Sets Speed Record At Bonneville Salt Flats

It’s funny how far laughing gas can take ‘ya…

Hybrid power is in a weird in-between state at the moment. On one side of the equation, you have insane spaceship-esque performance cars like the McLaren P1, Ferrari LaFerrari, and Porsche 918 Spyder. On the other side, you have calm, cool, collected commuter-mobiles like the Hyundai Ioniq. The question is how do you bridge these two philosophies? Both pair electrification with internal combustion, but the gulf between them seems impassable. Luckily, Hyundai is on the case, having set a new land speed record by going 157.825 mph in a specially modified Ioniq four-door.

“Our engineering team really pushed the limits to set this new segment benchmark while demonstrating the impressive durability of the entire Ioniq vehicle platform,” said Mike O’Brien, vice president of Corporate and Product Planning at Hyundai Motor America. “We expect this will be the first of many accolades for Ioniq.”

The effort was spearheaded by Hyundai Motor America’s Engineering and Quality Team (U.S.A.! U.S.A.!), which was so impressed with the car’s overall quality when it was first received, it decided to go for a land speed record.

The official record set was for production-based hybrid vehicles, as approved by the FIA. And although the official record is just under 158 mph, the race car actually peaked out at 160.7 mph.

So what’s it take to get an Ioniq going that fast? Read on for the details.

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2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric

2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric

Hyundai developed an electric car that can easily trump the competition

Hyundai has created a bit of a splash at the 2016 Geneva Auto Show with its Ioniq lineup. It has brought the Ioniq Hybrid, Ioniq Plug-in, and more importantly, the Ioniq Electric. The hybrid and plug-in variants use Hyundai’s 1.6-liter, GDI, gasoline engine, but the electric flies down the road with nothing more than a lithium-ion polymer battery and an electric motor. Those looking for all-electric mobility should take the Ioniq into consideration as it does offer a decent range on a full charge. The car itself is a little different on the outside compared to the hybrid and plug-in models, considering its electric nature and all. Aside from that, however, the car offers the same safety and infotainment features as the other models in the Ioniq lineup.

Jochen Sengpiehl, the Vice President of Marketing for Hyundai Motor Europe said, “Ioniq is an important step forward for our brand. We are bringing a unique new approach to e-mobility, with no compromise on design, driving pleasure and connectivity. And we’re making it accessible to more customers, further extending our product line-up.” So, let’s take a look at the Hyundai Ioniq Electric and see just what this vehicle brings to the table and why you should consider it as an alternative to gasoline-powered models.

Continue reading to learn more about the Hyundai Ioniq Electric.

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2017 Hyundai Ioniq

2017 Hyundai Ioniq

Is it good enough to give the almighty Prius a run for its money?

Despite the number of hybrid vehicles introduced over the last dozen years or so, none have really been able to take too big of a bite out of the sales figures for the poster child of hybrids, the Toyota Prius. Hyundai looks to change all of that with its own dedicated hybrid hatchback. The big news is that the model, dubbed Ioniq, also feature an all-electric drivetrain as in addition to the more familiar hybrid and plug-in hybrid setups you get with the Prius. As for the name, the company says it references "elements of its creation." An ion is an electrically-charged atom, linking to the car’s "clever combination of electrified powertrains," while the second part of the name references it unique place in the Hyundai lineup. Finally, the "Q" is depicted in the vehicle’s logo "as a visual breakthrough, acknowledging the fresh new approach of this advanced, low-emission model."

Granted, the Ioniq comes with a lot of fancy words, but the new nameplate does have at least one thing to brag about: it’s the first production car to offer hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and electric drivetrain in the same exterior package. Having unveiled the Ioniq to local media at its Namyang R&D Center in South Korea, Hyundai displayed the car at both the Geneva Motor Show and New York Auto Show in 2016. Will it have what it takes to give the popular Toyota Prius a run for its money? Find out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2017 Hyundai Ioniq.

Read more