Hyundai’s latest offering to race-eager customers is here

LISTEN 04:05

Like the other TCR cars before it, the Elantra N TCR is a race car you can’t get to drive on public roads. It has been developed to serve private racing teams and it’s underpinned by the popular Elantra sedan; although not much is carried over from the original car except the chassis and well, the name.

We got a glimpse of the new Hyundai Elantra N TCR back in 2020, at the Beijing Motor Show. That’s when we heard from Hyundai that development for the Elantra N TCR had started in mid-2019 from a blank sheet of paper, so designers and engineers could experiment and mix based on their previous experience in creating the i30 N TCR and Veloster N TCR. That said, let’s have a look at what awaits underneath the sheet metal.

Hyundai Elantra N TCR - Powertrain

2021 Hyundai Elantra N TCR Drivetrain
- image 938074

Under the hood sits a 2-liter (1998cc), inline-four turbo engine with two overhead camshafts and 16 valves. The mill churns out 350 PS (345 horsepower) at 7000 rpm and 450 Newton-meters (332 pound-feet) of torque at 3500 rpm.

Power goes to the front wheels through a six-speed sequential gearbox (it’s operated via paddle shifters) fitted with a cerametallic twin-disc clutch and a multi-plate limited-slip diff. We’re told Hyundai tested and finely tuned the drivetrain over 5,000 kilometers (3,100 miles), on which the Elantra N TCR was tested for three months in a variety of scenarios, including sprint racing and endurance.

2021 Hyundai Elantra N TCR specifications
Engine 2-liter (1998cc), inline-four turbo
Horsepower 345 HP @ 7,000 RPM
Torque 332 LB-FT @ 3,500 RPM
Transmission six-speed sequential

Hyundai Elantra N TCR - Chassis and Suspension

2021 Hyundai Elantra N TCR Exterior
- image 938070

In the front, Hyundai went for a MacPherson strut setup with coil springs and gas-filled dampers as well as an anti-roll bar. In the rear, the Elantra N TCR rides on a four-arm multilink axle, coil springs, gas-filled dampers, and an anti-roll bar. The steering is of the power assisted, rack and pinion variety.

Stopping power comes from six-piston calipers in the front biting into 380mm ventilated steel discs. The rear end braking setup gets two-piston calipers and 278mm rotors. Weight-wise, the Elantra N TCR must tip the scales at minimum 1,265 kilos (about 2,789 pounds) including the driver and the 100-liter (26.4-gallon) fuel tank.

Hyundai Elantra N TCR - Exterior and interior

2021 Hyundai Elantra N TCR Exterior
- image 938082

While it’s obvious what changes were made to the regular Elantra’s body (think new spoilers, a fixed rear wing and diffuser, as well as bulkier wheel arches and extra air vents), we don’t get too much details on what lies inside the Elantra N TCR. All Hyundai mentions relates to a pair of OMP race seats with six-point safety harnesses.

2021 Hyundai Elantra N TCR Interior
- image 938078

Granted, this is not your run-of-the-mill Elantra cabin in the sense that most of the panels have been surely deleted to save weight. A roll cage was installed and it’s safe to assume that the cabin now looks as ripped as a Spartan soldier’s abdomen. Oh, and the 18-inch wheels are aerdynamically-tweaked and designed by Hyundai Motorsport.

Availability and price

2021 Hyundai Elantra N TCR Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 938080

Hyundai intended to deliver the Elantra N TCR to paying customers starting with the end of 2020. We can’t tell you if race teams started to receive their cars, and there’s no price tag on the Elantra N TCR’s head announced at the time of writing. All we can say is that the i30 N TCR can be had for a base sticker of €128,000, which includes a €15,000 deposit that confirms your order. We guess the Elantra N TCR would be priced above the i30 N TCR, but there’s not enough information to put our fingers onto something palpable.

Tudor Rus
Tudor Rus
Assistant Content Manager - Automotive Expert - tudor@topspeed.com
Tudor’s first encounter with cars took place when he was only a child. Back then, his father brought home a Trabant 601 Kombi and a few years later, a Wartburg 353. At that time, he was too young to know how they worked and way too young to drive them, but he could see one thing – each of them had a different ethos and their own unique personality. As time went on, he started seeing that in other cars as well, and his love for the automobile was born.  Read full bio
About the author

Related Articles

2021 Hyundai Elantra

What do you think?
Show Comments
Car Finder: