Cars Jaguar Jaguar C-Type

Jaguar C-Type

1951 - 1953 Jaguar C-Type

1951 - 1953 Jaguar C-Type High Resolution Exterior
- image 636439
  • Jaguar C-Type
  • Year:
    1951- 1953
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    inline-6
  • Transmission:
    4-speed manual
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    210
  • 0-60 time:
    8 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    140 mph
  • 0-100 time:
    20 sec.
  • car segment:
  • body style:

It was 1950, and the postwar sports car racing scene was beginning to heat up. In some ways the scene wasn’t too different from now: the only way to be taken seriously as a purveyor of sporty vehicles was to go racing. Jaguar’s lovely XK120 was in the performance spotlight, thanks to its 120-mph top speed making it the fastest production vehicle of its day, and so it was only natural that the car hit the track.

Three nearly stock XK120s entered the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1950, modified by the factory but helmed by private drivers. The cars were reasonably successful, with one getting as high as second place before retiring while running third, and the other two finishing 12th and 15th. William Lyons, managing director of Jaguar, was impressed with the showing, and speculated that with a more rigid body and a significant weight drop, the cars would be even more competitive. The key to racing success was a dramatic makeover. Jaguar designed an aerodynamic lightweight body over a tube-frame chassis, retuned the engine, transmission and front suspension, and the XK120C, later known simply as the C-Type, was born.

Three C-Types entered Le Mans in 1951, and one of them won the race outright. Jaguar set record race speeds along the way. A more ambitious effort in 1952 fell flat, but in 1953 Jaguar won Le Mans again, with its three entries coming in first, second and fourth. The effort was more impressive because of Jaguar’s low-key approach; the factory team didn’t show up with a lot of fancy equipment like Ferrari or Alfa Romeo, and quietly went out and beat the established marques. This racing success didn’t just cement Jaguar’s reputation as a force to be reckoned with on the track; it also catapulted Jaguar to international fame. The C-Type is arguably responsible for Jaguar’s legendary status. A total of 53 C-types were produced from 1951 to 1953, and replicas are still being built today.

Continue reading to learn more about the Jaguar C-Type.

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1951 - 1953 Jaguar C-Type

1951 - 1953 Jaguar C-Type

It was 1950, and the postwar sports car racing scene was beginning to heat up. In some ways the scene wasn’t too different from now: the only way to be taken seriously as a purveyor of sporty vehicles was to go racing. Jaguar’s lovely XK120 was in the performance spotlight, thanks to its 120-mph top speed making it the fastest production vehicle of its day, and so it was only natural that the car hit the track.

Three nearly stock XK120s entered the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1950, modified by the factory but helmed by private drivers. The cars were reasonably successful, with one getting as high as second place before retiring while running third, and the other two finishing 12th and 15th. William Lyons, managing director of Jaguar, was impressed with the showing, and speculated that with a more rigid body and a significant weight drop, the cars would be even more competitive. The key to racing success was a dramatic makeover. Jaguar designed an aerodynamic lightweight body over a tube-frame chassis, retuned the engine, transmission and front suspension, and the XK120C, later known simply as the C-Type, was born.

Three C-Types entered Le Mans in 1951, and one of them won the race outright. Jaguar set record race speeds along the way. A more ambitious effort in 1952 fell flat, but in 1953 Jaguar won Le Mans again, with its three entries coming in first, second and fourth. The effort was more impressive because of Jaguar’s low-key approach; the factory team didn’t show up with a lot of fancy equipment like Ferrari or Alfa Romeo, and quietly went out and beat the established marques. This racing success didn’t just cement Jaguar’s reputation as a force to be reckoned with on the track; it also catapulted Jaguar to international fame. The C-Type is arguably responsible for Jaguar’s legendary status. A total of 53 C-types were produced from 1951 to 1953, and replicas are still being built today.

Continue reading to learn more about the Jaguar C-Type.

Read more
Petrolicious Pays Tribute To Jaguar C-Type: Video

Petrolicious Pays Tribute To Jaguar C-Type: Video

Back in the ’50s, Jaguar was the company to beat at Le Mans. Between the C-Type and the later 1954-1957 Jaguar D-Type, no other manufacturer took home as many wins as Jaguar during the ’50s, and even the mighty Mercedes-Benz 300SL only got one win. That’s because, as is often the case, Jaguar had a technological advantage that started with the debut of the XK120. For a car built so soon after WWII, it was highly advanced, and so Jaguar’s competition version of the car, the C-Type, won Le Mans the first year it raced there.

In the video, we get to see a C-Type that is going up for auction soon, and hear some of its history from David Swig, car specialist for RM Auctions. This is a 1953 model, a works lightweight, and it is a bit different than the original 1951 cars. That’s because that win by Mercedes in 1952 forced Jaguar to makes some changes in order to stay competitive. Those changes worked, and one of these 1953 works lightweights won again that year. From there, Jaguar developed the D-Type that took three Le Mans wins in a row.

Prices on C-Types vary quite a bit, but none of them are cheap. They tend to start at about $600,000 and will go up just over $3 million if it’s one of the two that won Le Mans. This car did not win, but it did come in 4th in 1953, and that makes it more valuable than most. RM Auctions hasn’t posted an official value estimate, but it will likely be in the upper end of the price range. And like all Petrolicious videos, this one is worth watching even if you don’t plan on buying the car.

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Video: Evolution Of Jaguar - From C-Type To F-Type

Video: Evolution Of Jaguar - From C-Type To F-Type

Although it has been missing from top-level motorsport for more than two decades now, Jaguar remains one of the world’s most successful race car manufacturers. Between the early 1950s and the early 1990s, the Brits brought home no less than seven 24 Hours of Le Mans trophies, just enough to place them right below Ferrari and above makers such as Bentley, Alfa Romeo, and Ford. Jaguar’s Le Mans success returned under the spotlight with the F-Type Project 7, a limited-edition sports car built to commemorate the company’s success in France.

And the folks over at XCAR thought it would be a great idea to look back on the F-Type’s spiritual predecessor, the E-Type, and the other two spectacular racers that preceded it, the C-Type and D-Type. Not only that, but the Brits also managed to round up all three vehicles on the same track for a 19-minute history lesson that covers nearly 24 years of good old Jaguar days.

It all begins with the C-Type, a track-exclusive car built to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans. It did so by dominating the 1953 race against heavy competition from Cunningham and Ferrari. XCAR also has a thorough look at the D-Type, yet another Jag confined to the race course. Built between 1954 and 1957, the D-Type was even more successful than the C-Type. It won the famed Le Mans event three times in a row between 1955 and 1957 and among its victims were various Ferraris, Aston Martins, and Porsches.

Finally, the video focuses on the E-Type, know as one of the most beautiful sports cars of the 20th century. When it debuted at the Geneva Motor Show in 1961, the E-Type had a 3.8-liter engine that delivered 265 horsepower and staggering performance for the era — naught to 62 mph in six seconds and a top speed of 150 mph. By 1970 displacement had increased to 4.2 liters, but the six-banger was dropped in 1971, when Jaguar offered a 5.3-liter, V-12 mill rated at up to 295 ponies and 300 pound-feet of torque.

Of course, there’s more to the E-Type than raw power and torque, but we’ll let you discover more by watching XCAR’s video. Hit the play button above for the greatest Jaguar trio to ever hit the street and track.

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Video: Jaguar Reveals a New Short Film: "Escapism"

Video: Jaguar Reveals a New Short Film: "Escapism"

What do you like to do when it’s time to relax? Jogging, swimming, playing a cool game, hanging out with your friends — these likely top most of your lists. But, we are pretty sure that for some of you here, the greatest joy is to get behind the wheel, push the pedal to the metal and just cruise the streets.

David Gandy is one of the guys with an ultimate passion for driving sports cars. Oh, who is he? He is a successful British model that also happens to be a huge Jaguar fan.

In this latest short movie revealed by the British automaker, called "Escapism," Gandy gets behind the wheel of some of the most amazing Jaguar models, ranging from the new F-Type roadster and going back in history to models like the C-Type, E-Type and XKSS.

All we can say is enjoy the video, we are pretty sure you will like what you will see!

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Video: Chris Harris Drives a Jaguar C-Type in Mille Miglia

Video: Chris Harris Drives a Jaguar C-Type in Mille Miglia

Chris Harris has long entertained us by reviewing some of the greatest cars out there, and the latest episode of Drive is no exception. This time around, Chris stepped outside of his comfort zone of modern-day sports cars and supercars to get behind the wheel of a classic Jaguar C-Type. To take him further out of his zone, Chris is driving the classic Jag in the famous Mille Miglia event, which forces him to drive slow and calculated speeds, as opposed to full-tilt, as he is used to.

The C-Type (with "C" coming from competition) was a racing sports car built by Jaguar and sold from 1951 to 1953. There were only 55 units built and all of them raced in competitions like the Le Mans 24 hours race, which it won twice. The C-Type was driven by legendary men like the Stirling Moss and Jack Fairman, Leslie Johnson and three-time Mille Miglia winner, Clemente Biondetti.

The C-Type is powered by a DOHC in-line six-cylinder engine with two SU carburetors. This powerplant delivered a total of 210 horsepower in its heyday.

At recent auctions, the model was auctioned for an amazing price of $3.7 million.

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Jaguar C-Type making a come back in 2012

Jaguar C-Type making a come back in 2012

The now Indian automaker, Jaguar, is currently working on a compact drop top sports car that can compete with the luxury roadsters of Germany, cars like the Audi TT, BMW Z4 and Mercedes Benz SLK. The modern day C-type will make its official debut in 2012, around the same time as the upcoming reincarnation of the E-Type and future mid-engine supercar.

The new C will be a lightweight two-seater, based around an aluminum monocoque for the best mix of chassis rigidity and weight reduction. Under the hood, Jaguar will use the same power plants as in the XF sedan. An entry-level version will be powered by a 3.0 Liter V6 making 235 HP and the top of the line model will take advantage of the new 5.0 Liter V8 making 380 HP. When it hits the test track, the eight cylinder version should be able to hit the 60 MPH mark in under 5 seconds.

So if Jaguar is bringing back the C-type, and plan to bring back the E-type, the only thing left for them to do would be a revival of the D-type. Perhaps it is the car’s racing pedigree or maybe it is the bulbous fenders or the vertical fin behind the driver’s head, but the D was the most attractive of all the classic Jaguar sports cars.

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Proteus Jaguar C-Type unveiled

Proteus Jaguar C-Type unveiled

Proteus Cars has been acquired by rival sports car manufacturer Enduro Cars. For 21 years Proteus has been a leader in the field of re-creation sports cars, such as its renowned Jaguar C-Type, and is synonymous the world over with quality and attention to detail. Enduro’s all aluminium C-Type replica was launched to much acclaim at the 2006 International Historic Motorsport Show, since when examples have been sold in the UK, US, Belgium, Germany and Portugal.
Proteus relaunch at Race Retro (...)

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