Back to Jaguar

Jaguar Auctions Cars

Models

view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
1960 Jaguar XK 150 S 3.8 Drophead Coupe

1960 Jaguar XK 150 S 3.8 Drophead Coupe

The most refined of all the original XKs

The Jaguar XK 150 was the final evolution of the original XK launched in 1949 and, as such, it was the most refined and the most powerful of them all. The S version came with a 3.8-liter engine from the Mark IX that developed 265-horsepower, impressive for the year 1960.

Just like its predecessor, the XK 140, the XK 150 was larger than the original XK 120, but it received some aesthetic improvements to make it look more modern. It originally came with the 3.4-liter DOHC inline-6 XK engine which developed 182 horsepower thanks to the updated cylinder head. The first XK 150s were sold in FHC (fixed-head coupe) specification with the drophead coupes arriving in 1958.

The XK 150 was kept in production until the end of 1960 when the final XK 150s were built for the 1961 model year. The following March, the E-Type was announced, and we all know how that went. But the appearance of the E-Type does not diminish the importance of the XK 120, and its XK 140 and XK 150 brethren, and the fact that now there’s an increasing market for these lush sports tourers.

Read more
1950 Jaguar XK 120 Alloy Roadster

1950 Jaguar XK 120 Alloy Roadster

The ’Leaping Cat’ that established Jaguar as a sports car manufacturer

The Jaguar XK120 was a turning point in Jaguar’s history and a sign of things to come. It was the fastest car in the whole world at the time of its launch in 1948 and remains one of the most beautiful British cars ever made.

First showcased at the 1948 London Auto Show held at the Earls Court, the XK120 was cheerfully received by an enthusiastic crowd who fell in love with the curvaceous and streamlined bodywork which covered the new XK inline-6 engine which promised never-before-seen performance on the road.

The first 242 XK120s were built with an alloy body until demand became so great that Jaguar switched to a different plant and began mass production in mid-1950. The XK120 spawned the XK140 and XK150 models which were successful evolutions of the concept and lasted in production all the way to the dawn of the ‘60s.

Read more
2017 Jaguar F-Pace Designer Edition

2017 Jaguar F-Pace Designer Edition

One-off SUV fetches hefty price tag at the Ben Ball auction

Automakers have always put particular importance on charity auctions. Not only is it good publicity for the brand, it also provides these companies with opportunities to make some form of contribution for the benefit of others. At one point or another, a car brand has gone the charity auction route to help raise money and awareness for a cause, and the latest to do so is Jaguar, which presented a unique F-Pace SUV that ultimately raised £102,500 ($127,920) at the annual Ben Ball in the U.K.

The SUV is officially known as the F-Pace Designer Edition, a title it was given because of the particular involvement of Jaguar’s famous head designer Ian Callum. It could as well have been called the F-Pace Ian Callum Edition too because, according to Jag, Callum himself was responsible for all of its bespoke appointments, which covers certain sections of its exterior and interior.

Seeing as how well-dressed the standard F-Pace already is, the Designer Edition is a next-level upgrade that adds extra splashes of shine into the SUV’s overall make-up. The fact that it’s also based on the range-topping F-Pace S variant means that it not only looks the part of a special edition SUV, it also performs like one.

The one-off F-Pace Designer’s Edition fetched a pretty impressive price at the Ben Ball auction given that the F-Pace S comes with a starting price of $57,700. Sadly, Jaguar has no plans to build any more F-Pace Design Editions after the one that was auctioned off at the Ben Ball. Those who got priced out at the auction can take comfort though since Jaguar appears to still have units of the F-Pace First Edition available in the U.K. That’s a good alternative, as are the myriad of options and accessories that the automaker is offering for the SUV in the first place.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Jaguar F-Pace Designers Edition.

Read more
Le Mans-Winning Jaguar D-Type To Be Auctioned In Monterey

Le Mans-Winning Jaguar D-Type To Be Auctioned In Monterey

The iconic Ecurie Ecosse D-Type is looking for a new owner

Introduced in 1954 and specifically for racing, the Jaguar D-Type went on to become one of the most iconic race cars ever built, scoring no fewer than 164 outright wins in 11 years, including three consecutive victories at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Naturally, the cars that triumphed at Le Mans are the most sought-after nowadays, and collectors will have the chance to bid on one such model at RM Sotheby’s auction event in Monterey on August 19-20.

The car in question is the Ecurie Ecosse-liveried D-Type that won the famous race in 1956. Driven by Ninian Sanderson and Ron Flockhart, the blue Jaguar won the event one lap ahead of Stirling Moss’ Aston Martin DB3S. The D-Type also defeated a Ferrari 625LM and a Porsche 55A/4 RS in the process.

Raced between 1955 and 1960, and then again in 1970, chassis no. XKD 501 scored a total of six overall wins. Four came in its first year on the track, the fifth was at Le Mans, and the sixth was at the only event it was entered in for 1970, 15 years after its inception. The car scored another 11 podium finishes throughout its career, making it one of the most successful D-Types. The car was raced at Goodwood, Mille Miglia, Silverstone, and Brands Hatch, among other race tracks in Europe. All but one of its 29 events were raced under the colors of Ecurie Ecosse, known for its signature metallic blue livery with the St. Andrews Cross on the front fenders.

Now offered from its third private owner, the XKD 501 comes with extensive documentation and has been restored to its original Le Mans specification. It has the same 3.4-liter six-cylinder engine (250 horsepower) with three Weber carburetors that is mated to a four-speed manual transmission. The independent front suspension, live rear axle, and four-wheel disc brakes are as authentic as they get, being sourced from Jaguar during the restoration.

Its impressive racing heritage and excellent condition means it won’t change owners for cheap, though. Much like other Le Mans winners, it will fetch big bucks when it crosses the auction block. There’s no official estimate, but it’s safe to assume we’re talking about a few million dollars.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
1954 - 1957 Jaguar D-Type

1954 - 1957 Jaguar D-Type

When the 24 Hours of Le Mans started up again after WWII, it took a few years for any one company to clearly dominate the race. The first several races were each wins for different marques, but Jaguar became the first one to win two postwar races in 1953, with the excellent C-Type racer. But, as good as the C-Type was, it was up against the technological marvel that was the Mercedes-Benz 300SL, as well as the Ferrari 375 Plus — a car that was almost more of a giant V-12 engine than it was car. So, even as the C-Type was taking an overall win in 1953, Jaguar was already working on a new version of the car.

The story of the D-Type starts with the XK120, Jaguar’s first postwar sports car. At the time, it was the fastest production car in the world, and so when Jaguar wanted to compete at Le Mans, it just made a competition version of the car (this being the C-Type). But, with the XK120 having debuted in 1948, most of the technology that went into it was prewar and by the mid ’50s there was a lot of new thinking and technology that could be applied — most importantly, a lot of airplane technology.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
1969 Lynx-Jaguar XKSS

1969 Lynx-Jaguar XKSS

It’s quite possible that you have heard of the Jaguar XKSS before. Steve McQueen famously had one and it’s one of those classics that sells for double-digit millions at auctions. But the Lynx-Jaguar XKSS is a different story, and it would almost be strange if you had heard of it before this. It is essentially a continuation car, built more than a decade after the original and by special order only from a shop specializing in Jaguar racing machines. Lynx (get it?) was a specialty shop dealing in Jaguar C-, D- and E-Types, making them the right sort of people to tackle the project of recreating one of Jaguar’s greatest.

Like Shelby Cobra continuation cars, the Lynx-built cars were made because authentic originals are so incredibly rare. The XKSS was built as an afterthought, simply because Jaguar had pulled out of motorsports after 1956 and had some leftover D-Types. These cars were converted into road cars through the addition of a passenger door, full windshield and a few other bolt-on bits. Since they were made only from leftovers, just 16 of the XKSS were ever built, leaving many wealthy Jaguar fans with feelings of intense jealousy.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lynx-Jaguar XKSS.

Read more
Barn-Find 1973 Jaguar E-Type Series III V12 Roadster Will Be Auctioned In May

Barn-Find 1973 Jaguar E-Type Series III V12 Roadster Will Be Auctioned In May

You’ll have a hard time finding a better-preserved, original E-Type than this. It’s not concours quality, but that’s for stuffy people who like to wear funny hats while looking at cars on a golf course. This 1973 Jaguar E-Type Series III V12 Roadster has far more character, and it’s crossing the block at the upcoming Silverstone Auctions event at the Silverstone Circuit in England on May 23.

Though it was found in a barn-like structure, calling it a “barn find” is actually a little misleading. After covering just 7,700 miles since new, it was meticulously cared for by one family through three generations. The original owner’s son had it “properly immobilized” as an investment by injecting oil into the cylinders and storing it in a heated brick barn in 1996. Three years later the car passed on to his son, who put it in a dehumidified air bubble storage unit. The car remained there until 2006, when it was moved to the farm shed where it was “found” late last year.

Continue reading to learn more about this barn-find 1973 Jaguar E-Type Series III V12 Roadster.

Read more
1955 Jaguar D-Type Auctioned

1955 Jaguar D-Type Auctioned

Revered by Steve McQueen, who drove the road-going XKSS version, and three-time overall winner of the Le Mans 24 hours race, the D-Type is one of the most famous Jaguars ever. Since with fame usually comes fortune, the few remaining D-Types out there command outrageous prices at auctions, and the following example is likely to provide more proof of that when it goes on sale on March 14, 2015. In fact, the car is expected to fetch around $4 million, which would put it right up there with some of the most expensive Ferraris from the era.

One of only 54 cars produced for privateer customers, this XCD 530 chassis has been used mainly for ice racing, believe it or not, as the car was originally sold to a Finnish professional tennis player who was also known for his racing exploits in F3 midget cars and a Jaguar C-Type. Curt Lincoln, the original owner, apparently wanted to circumvent a large import tax on his D-Type and instructed Jaguar to make the model appear used.

Updated 03/16/2015: As expected this 1955 Jaguar D-Type turned out to be a real success: this Saturday it was auctioned at Amelia Island for $3,675,000.

Click past the jump to read more about this 1955 Jaguar D-Type.

Read more
British Dentist Sells His Private Car Collection to Jaguar

British Dentist Sells His Private Car Collection to Jaguar

Car collecting has taken on a whole new meaning thanks to one British dentist who amassed the largest private collection in Britain with multiple warehouses stocked full of antique Jaguars, Bentleys, Austins, and Minis. However Dr. James Hull’s collection is now in the care of Jaguar Land Rover after the automaker purchased the entire fleet for an undisclosed amount.

The collection consists of 543 classic cars dating back to the 1930s and is estimated to be worth some £100 million, or roughly $168,346,500 U.S. dollars as of August 7, 2014. Among the collection are cars like Sir Winston Churchill’s Austin, Lord Mountbatten’s Mini Traveller, and even Sir Elton John’s Bentley.

Besides the sheer number of vehicles, the collection’s breath of variety is also intriguing. It ranges from million-dollar Jaguars down to the must humble Morris Minors, a plane-Jane economy car produced from the 1940s through 1970s.

Included are even pristine examples of a super-rare 1950s-era Jaguar XKSS and a D-Type worth more than $6.7 million together. Hull’s vehicles even include classic pedal cars dating back to the 1920s to present day. Perhaps the most special one is a Ferrari example that was hand-built in Maranello, Italy in the 1950s.

It’s unclear what Jaguar Land Rover plans to do with the massive collection, but it’s a sure bet that all 543 cars are in good hands. Perhaps those vehicles not wearing a Jaguar badge will end up at auction, possibly fetching a profit for the British automaker. Be sure to check out the video below the jump.

Click past the jump to learn more about this private collection.

Read more
1952 Jaguar C-Type expected to be sold for $3.7 million at auction

1952 Jaguar C-Type expected to be sold for $3.7 million at auction

London is already going to be seeing a beautiful Pagani Zonda R at this year’s Automobiles of London event held by RM Auctions on October 27th, but one rare vehicle isn’t enough for the auction house. In fact, the very rare 1952 Jaguar C-Type is expected to fetch even more than the Pagani; theJaguar is expected to bring in $3.7 million. Predicting such a high return on this classic may sound a little ridiculous to some, but this vehicle has an incredible history. This 1952 Jaguar was driven by Masten Gregory, who came out victorious at the Golden Gate Nationals.

Max Girardo, Managing Director of RM Europe, said: "Specifically designed to win the Le Mans 24 hour race, the legendary C-Type Jaguar is one of the most desirable sports racing cars ever built."

The C-Type features a 210 bhp, 3,442 cc double overhead camshaft inline six-cylinder engine with two SU carburetors mated to a four-speed manual transmission. It has an independent front suspension with upper and lower wishbones, torsion bars and hydraulic dampers, live rear axle with trailing arms, a ‘double-action’ torsion bar, and a torque reaction member. The final features are the hydraulic dampers and four-wheel Lockhead hydraulic drum brakes.

Stay tuned for more details surrounding the star-packed event in London on October 27th!

Read more
Gooding & Company puts a Jaguar D Type race car up for auction

Gooding & Company puts a Jaguar D Type race car up for auction

As classic an automobile that the Jaguar E Type was in the 1960s and 70s, it never could have come about without the factory built D Type race cars of the 1950s. If you missed out on the opportunity to own and experience this classic vertical finned racer with its pronounced round fenders well this might just be what you have been waiting for. That is because the auction house Gooding & Company is putting a classic 1956 Jaguar D Type up for auction on January 23rd, 2010. Besides the English automotive icon, Gooding will also auction off a rare Pininfarina 1959 Ferrari 250 GT Series I Cabriolet, a beautifully appointed 1956 Maserati A6G/54 Berlinetta, Hollywood’s 1934 Hispano-Suiza J-12 T68 Cabriolet as well as a top performing 1932 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750.

The 1956 Jaguar D Type is powered by a 3.8 Liter straight six cylinder power plant that is capable of producing an estimated 300 HP, quite a feat for the 1950s. The quite large inline engine is mated to a four speed manual transmission because that is what they had back then. The car begun its racing career in 1956 competing in California and enjoyed continued success at tracks such as Santa Barbara, Bakersfield, Palm Springs, Riverside, Paramount Ranch and Pomona. Making the D Type even more of a collector’s item is that over the car’s entire production run, only 87 units were ever made, and after a bit of wheel banging action there are most certainly less than that left in the world.

Press release after the jump.

Read more
Prototype Jaguar sells for $5 million

Prototype Jaguar sells for $5 million

The “missing link” Jaguar fetches $5 million at at Bonhams & Butterfields’ Quail Lodge Sale in California last week. This car sets a new record for Jaguar prices, but falls short of the ultra-exclusive Bugatti Type 57C Atalante that sold for $7.92 over the weekend a few miles up the road in Pebble Beach.

This Jag is the 1960 E2A prototype racer that bridged the gap between the champion D-Type and legendary E-Type. Renowned race drivers Dan Gurney and Walt Hansgen turned the wheel of this car at the 1960 Le Mans. It was raced under Briggs Cunningham’s race team, and the car still carries the team’s white with blue stripes colors today. Unfortunately the car never finished the race when the head gasket failed. The one-of-a-kind racer did go on to victory in the 1960 race in Bridgehampton, New York.

Read more