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1960 Jaguar XK 150 S 3.8 Drophead Coupe

1960 Jaguar XK 150 S 3.8 Drophead Coupe

The most refined of all the original XKs

The Jaguar XK 150 was the final evolution of the original XK launched in 1949 and, as such, it was the most refined and the most powerful of them all. The S version came with a 3.8-liter engine from the Mark IX that developed 265-horsepower, impressive for the year 1960.

Just like its predecessor, the XK 140, the XK 150 was larger than the original XK 120, but it received some aesthetic improvements to make it look more modern. It originally came with the 3.4-liter DOHC inline-6 XK engine which developed 182 horsepower thanks to the updated cylinder head. The first XK 150s were sold in FHC (fixed-head coupe) specification with the drophead coupes arriving in 1958.

The XK 150 was kept in production until the end of 1960 when the final XK 150s were built for the 1961 model year. The following March, the E-Type was announced, and we all know how that went. But the appearance of the E-Type does not diminish the importance of the XK 120, and its XK 140 and XK 150 brethren, and the fact that now there’s an increasing market for these lush sports tourers.

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1950 Jaguar XK 120 Alloy Roadster

1950 Jaguar XK 120 Alloy Roadster

The ’Leaping Cat’ that established Jaguar as a sports car manufacturer

The Jaguar XK120 was a turning point in Jaguar’s history and a sign of things to come. It was the fastest car in the whole world at the time of its launch in 1948 and remains one of the most beautiful British cars ever made.

First showcased at the 1948 London Auto Show held at the Earls Court, the XK120 was cheerfully received by an enthusiastic crowd who fell in love with the curvaceous and streamlined bodywork which covered the new XK inline-6 engine which promised never-before-seen performance on the road.

The first 242 XK120s were built with an alloy body until demand became so great that Jaguar switched to a different plant and began mass production in mid-1950. The XK120 spawned the XK140 and XK150 models which were successful evolutions of the concept and lasted in production all the way to the dawn of the ‘60s.

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Budget Direct Renders the Evolution of 7 Timeless Models

Budget Direct Renders the Evolution of 7 Timeless Models

Don’t expect any of these models to go away anytime soon

There is no shortage of car models in the auto industry these days. Some models have gained followings while others have become flashes in the pan. Then there are the titans of the business, the models that have lasted the test of time and have been around, literally, for generations. In the course of their respective lifetimes, these models have evolved in more ways than one, none more evident than their designs. These seven models have been around for so long their designs have evolved considerably from when they first came out. Knowing their place in the business, these models are unlikely to go away anytime soon.

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Jaguar Land Rover's First Classic Car Facility Comes To The U.S.

Jaguar Land Rover’s First Classic Car Facility Comes To The U.S.

The classics will now have a safe go-to place to cater to their needs

Jaguar Land Rover has some good news for classic car fanatics. The British automaker is opening a classic car refurbishing and restoration center in North America. Apart from restoration, the center will also sell and service JLR’s classic vehicles. The facility will open in Savannah, Georgia in the summer of 2019.

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Restoration: The Beautiful 1974 Jaguar E-Type Series 3

Restoration: The Beautiful 1974 Jaguar E-Type Series 3

The car is still as drool-worthy as ever, albeit with the latest technology

Restorations are always fun; the beauty of retro aligning with the technology of today, the old-school interiors getting a touch of modern material. While car lovers take this up as a task and do it themselves, there are professional companies which also do it. One such company is E-type UK, which specializes in restoring only the Jaguar E-Type models. This time around, they have restored a 1974 Jaguar E-Type Series 3.

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A Classic Jaguar is Being Brought Back To Life

A Classic Jaguar is Being Brought Back To Life

Jag confirms build of 25 models

While it’s not exactly as famous as the Jaguar E-Type — no Jag is — the D-Type is still regarded as one of the most iconic Jaguars in history. Only 75 D-Type units were built in the late 1950s after Jaguar initially planned to build 100 units. Apparently, Jag’s failure to reach its intended goal has gnawed at the company for years. Well, Jag’s finally doing something to address that by announcing plans to build the last 25 units of the D-Type. This is not a drill, folks. Jaguar really is going to build the last 25 units of the iconic race car, completing what it should’ve done 60 years ago.

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1958 Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly'

1958 Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly’

A British classic with unreal performance potential

Throughout the 1950’s, Jaguar was busy establishing itself as a major power when it came to racing at Le Mans and sports car racing in general, owing much to such icons as the C-Type and its successor, the D-Type. By 1957, the Cat Badge had acquired as many as four wins at the iconic 24-hour race, not to mention numerous additional wins around the world. Unfortunately, Jag was stopped dead in its tracks when its Browns Lane factory in Coventry burned down in a fire on February 12th of that year, subsequently destroying the brand’s competition vehicles and the means to produce them, not to mention nine D-Types slated for road duty in XKSS specification. However, rather than throwing in the towel, Jaguar responded by turning to its motorsports partner Lister Motor Company, and a deal was struck wherein Lister would supply a body and chassis, while Jaguar would outfit it with an engine and drivetrain components. Thus, the iconic Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly’ was born, and with it, further competition success for the British automaker. Equipped with a lightweight aluminum body, advanced suspension and brakes, and a powerful six-cylinder engine, these curvaceous racers had the right stuff to once again propel its drivers to the top of podium.

These days, the Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly’ is considered highly collectible, with some examples easily fetching several million dollars at auction. We managed to catch one at the Mecum Auction in Monterey, California, this past August, and present it here for your lust and admiration.

Continue reading to learn more about Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly’.

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Jaguar XK SS Prototype Previews $1.25 Million Continuation Cars in L.A.

Jaguar XK SS Prototype Previews $1.25 Million Continuation Cars in L.A.

Nine will be made and sold to carefully selected Jaguar owners

In 2014, Jaguar and its Heritage division decided to build the remaining six chassis of the E-Type Lightweight sports car exactly 50 years after the final original example left the factory. The new-old cars were put together using numerous original parts and techniques, as well as modern technology for improved safety, and became an instant hit with collectors, despite the £1.2 million (around $1.5 million as of November 2016) sticker. As a result, Jaguar turned its attention to yet another classic sports car whose production came to an abrupt halt: the XK SS. And, the prototype that will be used as a blueprint for the continuation cars was just presented at the 2016 Los Angeles Auto Show.

Often referred to as the world’s first supercar, the XK SS was originally produced in 1957 using chassis and components from the retired D-Type race car, which had won the 24 Hours of Le Mans three times in a row. Initial plans included a 25-unit production, but nine cars earmarked for export to North America were lost in a massive fire at Jaguar’s factory, leaving only 16 examples on the road. Much like it did with the E-Type Lightweight, Jaguar plans to roll out the remaining nine cars in 2017.

All vehicles, which will look identical to the Sherwood Green prototype shown in L.A. (except for the paint of course) will be completely new and have period chassis numbers from the XK SS chassis log. The cars will cost "in excess of £1 million each." That’s at least $1.25 million. Why the steep price you ask? Well, not only are these cars difficult to build, as the prototype required 18 months of intense work and research, but they’re also highly desirable among collectors and will be sold to carefully selected customers who already own classic Jaguars. All told, the new XK SS won’t be a dealership model and not everyone can buy one. And, despite the high sticker, the Brits will have no trouble selling all nine examples.

So how new is the "new" XK SS? Jaguar says that most components are true to the original car, including the magnesium alloy body, the bronze welded chassis frames, the four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes with a Plessey pump, and Dunlop tires with riveted two-piece magnesium alloy wheels. The engine will be the same 3.4-liter, six-cylinder, D-type unit rated at 262 horsepower, but it will feature completely new cast iron blocks, new cast cylinder heads and three Weber DC03 carburetors. On the other hand, because the original styling bucks do not exist, Jaguar Classic produced a new, bespoke styling buck based on the original bodies from the 1950s.

Inside, the XK SS will get perfect recreations of the original Smiths gauges, the wood-rimmed steering wheel, grain of the leather seats, and brass knobs on the dashboard. However, minor specification changes have been made in order to improve driver and passenger safety. The fuel cell, for example, uses modern materials to support throughput of modern fuels. Jaguar will probably give customers a few exterior color options based on its 1950s palette, including the iconic British Racing Green.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Real Racing 3 Launches Evolution of Jaguar Car Pack

Real Racing 3 Launches Evolution of Jaguar Car Pack

Do you have what it takes to win a (virtual) 1963 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight?

It may not be as powerful or as detailed as the Gran Turismo or Forza Motorsports video game franchises, but mobile racing simulator Real Racing 3 also has its share of fans and gamers alike. Now, those people have been rewarded with a new update package that can unlock three of the most prized Jaguars of all time. There is one catch though. The cars won’t be available as soon as the update is downloaded. If gamers want to get them, they’re going to have to compete for them.

The package is called Evolution of Jaguar, a fitting name for an update that can yield a gamer the 1963 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight, the Jaguar XJ220, and the Jaguar F-Type SVR. Each of the three models will be available as rewards of three Jaguar Legacy events that are also part of the update. The first of these events, Jaguar Legacy: Part 1, kicks off today, August, 9, and will be followed by Parts 2 and 3 in the coming days and weeks. The three events make up the six real-time racing events included in the update, each having a window from anywhere between four to nine days. All the players need to do is to win these events for the chance to take home the classic Jags.

In addition to the Jaguars that are up for grabs, the update also includes events wherein the prizes include the Dodge Challenger Hellcat and the Mercedes SLS GT3, complete with a new livery kit. Capping off this rather eventful update is the eight season of the Gauntlet challenge, which begins on September 10. Players who compete in this event have the chance to win a 2016 Porsche 911 Carrera S.

All told, that’s six cars that players of Real Racing 3 can add to their virtual garages. They’re going to have to work for hard for all of them and if they think they’re up to the task, they can start downloading the Evolution of Jaguar pack as a free download through the Apple App Store, Amazon App Store, and Google Play.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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Peruvian Man Professes His Love For His Jaguar E-Type: Video

Peruvian Man Professes His Love For His Jaguar E-Type: Video

It’s a love story between man and machine

Every automaker has a model that’s regarded as the best it has ever built. In the case of Jaguar, that model is the E-Type. Naturally, those who are fortunate enough to still own one of these models keep them in as good a condition as possible. Then there’s Miguel Rodrigo, a Peruvian architect who loves his 1964 Jaguar E-Type Roadster so much he doesn’t keep it tucked in his garage to collect dust. Instead, he drives the E-Type as much as he can, even admitting to driving it “from border to border” twice.

I’m not exactly sure what borders Rodrigo is referring to since Peru has five of them, but his point is crystal clear. He is getting as much enjoyment as he can from his prized E-Type the way any car enthusiast should.

Rodrigo loves his E-Type so much that he’s actually used it in a number of racing events, none more notable than Peru’s version of the Cannonball rally. True to form, the E-Type obliterated the opposition in the race, finishing four hours ahead of the eventual runner-up. It’s a remarkable achievement considering how far Rodrigo had to go just so he could have an opportunity to not only buy the classic Jag in a U.S. auction, but also have it shipped to Peru legally.

Then again, these are the kind of lengths we go to for the cars that we truly love. There’s no challenge hard enough for us to conquer if it means being rewarded with a car that we’ve dreamt about for years.

That’s the story of Miguel Rodrigo and his Jaguar E-Type. It’s a perfect example of a man, his car, and the rewards of passion and determination.

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Le Mans-Winning Jaguar D-Type To Be Auctioned In Monterey

Le Mans-Winning Jaguar D-Type To Be Auctioned In Monterey

The iconic Ecurie Ecosse D-Type is looking for a new owner

Introduced in 1954 and specifically for racing, the Jaguar D-Type went on to become one of the most iconic race cars ever built, scoring no fewer than 164 outright wins in 11 years, including three consecutive victories at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Naturally, the cars that triumphed at Le Mans are the most sought-after nowadays, and collectors will have the chance to bid on one such model at RM Sotheby’s auction event in Monterey on August 19-20.

The car in question is the Ecurie Ecosse-liveried D-Type that won the famous race in 1956. Driven by Ninian Sanderson and Ron Flockhart, the blue Jaguar won the event one lap ahead of Stirling Moss’ Aston Martin DB3S. The D-Type also defeated a Ferrari 625LM and a Porsche 55A/4 RS in the process.

Raced between 1955 and 1960, and then again in 1970, chassis no. XKD 501 scored a total of six overall wins. Four came in its first year on the track, the fifth was at Le Mans, and the sixth was at the only event it was entered in for 1970, 15 years after its inception. The car scored another 11 podium finishes throughout its career, making it one of the most successful D-Types. The car was raced at Goodwood, Mille Miglia, Silverstone, and Brands Hatch, among other race tracks in Europe. All but one of its 29 events were raced under the colors of Ecurie Ecosse, known for its signature metallic blue livery with the St. Andrews Cross on the front fenders.

Now offered from its third private owner, the XKD 501 comes with extensive documentation and has been restored to its original Le Mans specification. It has the same 3.4-liter six-cylinder engine (250 horsepower) with three Weber carburetors that is mated to a four-speed manual transmission. The independent front suspension, live rear axle, and four-wheel disc brakes are as authentic as they get, being sourced from Jaguar during the restoration.

Its impressive racing heritage and excellent condition means it won’t change owners for cheap, though. Much like other Le Mans winners, it will fetch big bucks when it crosses the auction block. There’s no official estimate, but it’s safe to assume we’re talking about a few million dollars.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Jay Leno Takes Us On A 360-Degree Drive With A 1954 Jaguar XK120

Jay Leno Takes Us On A 360-Degree Drive With A 1954 Jaguar XK120

It’s the most fun you’ll ever have on board an iconic Jaguar

Riding shotgun in a 1954 Jaguar XK120 with Jay Leno driving is nearly impossible to do if you don’t know the comedian and famous auto collector. But thanks to 360-degree video technology, you don’t have to be in the actual car to experience the thrill of doing so. Granted, it’s still better to sit in it, but we’ll take what we can get.

The video runs close to four minutes long and in that space of time, Leno goes into story-telling mode as he recounts the history behind his XK120 and how he’s had it since 1984. He also talks about the modifications he’s made to the car, including replacing the original 3.0-liter engine with a 4.2-liter that produces “about 250 horsepower.” Other than that, this XK120 is completely stock.

Once you’ve spent time listening to Leno’s stories, you can go back to the start of the video like I did and just spend it playing around with the 360-degree controls on the top-left part of the YouTube screen. Trust me, it’s fun just whirling around the car to see Leno talking directly to you and the incredible scenery around him. And if you want extra effects, point a fan directly to your face to simulate the rush of air blowing your hair in all directions. I may or may not have done that myself.

Go check the video out!

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