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1973 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 2+2

1973 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 2+2

The E-Type that gets the least amount of love

The Jaguar E-Type Series 3 is the ugly duckling of the E-Type family as well as the swansong of the legendary car. It was produced between 1971 and 1975 and came with further body modifications that make it less desirable today than an early S1 example. The S3 you see here was restored and subtly upgraded by E-Type UK, one of the top Jaguar E-Type specialists in the world.

By the dawn of the ’70s, the E-Type was very much like an aging rock star. It’s past its best days but still soldiering on with the same party tricks that made it a hit when it first appeared on the scene. However, the 4.2-liter, inline-six, XK engine was finally showing its age thanks to a string of tougher emission regulations that gradually lowered the power output. Jaguar needed to perform a heart transplant on their legendary sports car and decided their best bet would be the V-12 engine that was originally designed for the XJ sedan. The result wasn’t the much-hyped F-Type (as pundits at the time suggested the new Jag sports car would be called) but the E-Type S3.

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1960 Jaguar XK 150 S 3.8 Drophead Coupe

1960 Jaguar XK 150 S 3.8 Drophead Coupe

The most refined of all the original XKs

The Jaguar XK 150 was the final evolution of the original XK launched in 1949 and, as such, it was the most refined and the most powerful of them all. The S version came with a 3.8-liter engine from the Mark IX that developed 265-horsepower, impressive for the year 1960.

Just like its predecessor, the XK 140, the XK 150 was larger than the original XK 120, but it received some aesthetic improvements to make it look more modern. It originally came with the 3.4-liter DOHC inline-6 XK engine which developed 182 horsepower thanks to the updated cylinder head. The first XK 150s were sold in FHC (fixed-head coupe) specification with the drophead coupes arriving in 1958.

The XK 150 was kept in production until the end of 1960 when the final XK 150s were built for the 1961 model year. The following March, the E-Type was announced, and we all know how that went. But the appearance of the E-Type does not diminish the importance of the XK 120, and its XK 140 and XK 150 brethren, and the fact that now there’s an increasing market for these lush sports tourers.

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1950 Jaguar XK 120 Alloy Roadster

1950 Jaguar XK 120 Alloy Roadster

The ’Leaping Cat’ that established Jaguar as a sports car manufacturer

The Jaguar XK120 was a turning point in Jaguar’s history and a sign of things to come. It was the fastest car in the whole world at the time of its launch in 1948 and remains one of the most beautiful British cars ever made.

First showcased at the 1948 London Auto Show held at the Earls Court, the XK120 was cheerfully received by an enthusiastic crowd who fell in love with the curvaceous and streamlined bodywork which covered the new XK inline-6 engine which promised never-before-seen performance on the road.

The first 242 XK120s were built with an alloy body until demand became so great that Jaguar switched to a different plant and began mass production in mid-1950. The XK120 spawned the XK140 and XK150 models which were successful evolutions of the concept and lasted in production all the way to the dawn of the ‘60s.

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1958 Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly'

1958 Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly’

A British classic with unreal performance potential

Throughout the 1950’s, Jaguar was busy establishing itself as a major power when it came to racing at Le Mans and sports car racing in general, owing much to such icons as the C-Type and its successor, the D-Type. By 1957, the Cat Badge had acquired as many as four wins at the iconic 24-hour race, not to mention numerous additional wins around the world. Unfortunately, Jag was stopped dead in its tracks when its Browns Lane factory in Coventry burned down in a fire on February 12th of that year, subsequently destroying the brand’s competition vehicles and the means to produce them, not to mention nine D-Types slated for road duty in XKSS specification. However, rather than throwing in the towel, Jaguar responded by turning to its motorsports partner Lister Motor Company, and a deal was struck wherein Lister would supply a body and chassis, while Jaguar would outfit it with an engine and drivetrain components. Thus, the iconic Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly’ was born, and with it, further competition success for the British automaker. Equipped with a lightweight aluminum body, advanced suspension and brakes, and a powerful six-cylinder engine, these curvaceous racers had the right stuff to once again propel its drivers to the top of podium.

These days, the Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly’ is considered highly collectible, with some examples easily fetching several million dollars at auction. We managed to catch one at the Mecum Auction in Monterey, California, this past August, and present it here for your lust and admiration.

Continue reading to learn more about Lister-Jaguar ‘Knobbly’.

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1961 - 1968 Jaguar E-Type

1961 - 1968 Jaguar E-Type

When talking about cult icons, adjectives usually stream in an overwhelming fashion, making it hard to discern fact from fabrication. The Jaguar E-Type is one of these cars, earning an invitation to the Pantheon of motoring just as quick as the first journalists laid eyes on it. The long hood belied the size of the white two-door sports car as it was sitting on an exquisite animal print wall-to-wall. The public was elated, so much so that a second car was driven from Britain to Switzerland as Sir William Lyons, the company’s founder, was already receiving orders for the new ,,Big Cat’’.

Such was the initial impact of the E-Type that even the Italians, who were famed for putting together some of the most beautiful cars in existence, were left dumbfounded. One Italian in particular eulogized the styling of Jaguar’s new two-seater. His name? None other than Ferrari founder Enzo Ferrari, who is quoted to have said that the XK-E, as it was marketed in the USA, is "the most beautiful car in the world".

Despite of early reliability issues that pushed the debut date of the racing version further into 1962, the E-Type proved handy on race tracks around the world, especially the 12 lightweight chassis. Away from the track, the first E-Type, known as the S1, was built in far greater numbers, nearly 40,000 cars coming out of the Coventry-based plant between 1961 and 1968. The figure includes all variations, including the less fluid 2+2.

While the E-Type stayed in production until 1975, the S1 is the most distinguishable, as the latter versions lost the headlight covers as well as adopting larger fender flares, on the S3, that somehow messed with the original shape. This is mainly why the first iteration is also the most sought-after, with prices rising each year.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1961-1968 Jaguar E-Type.

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1975 - 1980 Jaguar XJ-S V12

1975 - 1980 Jaguar XJ-S V12

The Jaguar XJS has an odd sort of niche as a classic car. As the replacement for the 1961-1975 Jaguar E-Type, there was a lot of misunderstanding about what kind of a car it was supposed to be. A lot of people think it was a terrible sports car, when in reality it was built as a grand tourer/executive coupe. It was also first built at a time when emissions regulations strangled the engine, 5-mph bumpers disrupted the flow of the lines in the bodywork and Jaguar’s reliability as a whole was not quite where you’d want it to be. But the XJS was in production for a long time, from 1975 to 1996 (for a total of 115,413 units, a huge number for car in this price range), so it clearly offered something to those who bought them.

Harry Metcalfe, formerly of EVO magazine, has put out a new video talking about the history of the XJS and taking a look at a well preserved Series I example.

Continue reading to learn more about the Jaguar XJ-S V12.

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1951 - 1953 Jaguar C-Type

1951 - 1953 Jaguar C-Type

It was 1950, and the postwar sports car racing scene was beginning to heat up. In some ways the scene wasn’t too different from now: the only way to be taken seriously as a purveyor of sporty vehicles was to go racing. Jaguar’s lovely XK120 was in the performance spotlight, thanks to its 120-mph top speed making it the fastest production vehicle of its day, and so it was only natural that the car hit the track.

Three nearly stock XK120s entered the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1950, modified by the factory but helmed by private drivers. The cars were reasonably successful, with one getting as high as second place before retiring while running third, and the other two finishing 12th and 15th. William Lyons, managing director of Jaguar, was impressed with the showing, and speculated that with a more rigid body and a significant weight drop, the cars would be even more competitive. The key to racing success was a dramatic makeover. Jaguar designed an aerodynamic lightweight body over a tube-frame chassis, retuned the engine, transmission and front suspension, and the XK120C, later known simply as the C-Type, was born.

Three C-Types entered Le Mans in 1951, and one of them won the race outright. Jaguar set record race speeds along the way. A more ambitious effort in 1952 fell flat, but in 1953 Jaguar won Le Mans again, with its three entries coming in first, second and fourth. The effort was more impressive because of Jaguar’s low-key approach; the factory team didn’t show up with a lot of fancy equipment like Ferrari or Alfa Romeo, and quietly went out and beat the established marques. This racing success didn’t just cement Jaguar’s reputation as a force to be reckoned with on the track; it also catapulted Jaguar to international fame. The C-Type is arguably responsible for Jaguar’s legendary status. A total of 53 C-types were produced from 1951 to 1953, and replicas are still being built today.

Continue reading to learn more about the Jaguar C-Type.

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2013 Jaguar Eagle Low Drag GT

2013 Jaguar Eagle Low Drag GT

As the Jaguar product renaissance continues full-steam ahead with the XQ-type crossover’s reveal, there is even more excitement back home with the debut of the Eagle Low Drag GT.

Sharing the lawn with dozens of other priceless exotics, the Eagle Low Drag GT applies the same priceless supercar restoration and upgrade that makes its Speedster such a showstopper.

Finished in gorgeous hand-polished aluminum for the panels and chassis, the Low Drag GT revives one of the most celebrated Jaguar racing concepts ever: a fastback E-type that was wider, more powerful and far more streamlined than any production Jaguar coupe from then or now.

The original E-type was many things during its prime, including a super-rapid, high-speed express that could reach huge top speeds for a fraction of the price of its competition from Italy.

For all this beauty and heritage that flows into the F-type today, the E-type was surprisingly never a truly successful racing machine or a good-looking two-seat coupe.

As Jaguar puts the final touches on the F-type Coupe ahead of its arrival this spring, the Eagle Low Drag GT is the perfect example of Jaguar fastback style.

With pricing likely to be in the seven digits and a total production run of perhaps five cars, the 2013 Eagle Low Drag GT writes a new chapter in the celebrated Jaguar E-type legacy.

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2011 Eagle E-Type Lightweight Speedster

2011 Eagle E-Type Lightweight Speedster

Two years ago, British manufacturer Eagle introduced the world to their rendition of the Jaguar E-type with the E-Type Speedster at the Salon Prive. The car was light, fast, and it gave the driver hassle-free driving when compared to the E-Types of yesteryear. Now the company has reworked their modern day classic with an even lighter version called the Eagle E-Type Lightweight Speedster, scheduled to make its debut at the Salon Prive at Syon House in west London on June 22-24, 2011

Eagle is well-known for their dedication to the development of Jaguar’s E-Types and have been restoring and selling them since 1982. Their passion for the E-Type is what lead them to create a model that throws back to the design of Jaguar’s Lightweight E-Type race cars built in 1963, but with a modern twist and a more powerful engine.

The Eagle Lightweight Speedster only weighs 2,200 lbs and that weight is powered by a 4.7 liter, aluminum in line 6 cylinder engine that delivers an impressive 310 HP with a peak torque of 340 lb-ft.

UPDATE 07/09/12: The folks over at Eagle Speedster have released a fresh batch of high-res photos of the gorgeous sports car, which you can check out in the gallery!

Hit the jump to read more about the Eagle E-Type Lightweight Speedster.

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1954 - 1957 Jaguar XKD

1954 - 1957 Jaguar XKD

The Jaguar D-Type sports cars were produced from 1954 through 1957. These factory-built race cars were similar to the C-Type, but given more powerful engines, improved chassis, and aerodynamic bodies.

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