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1973 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 2+2

1973 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 2+2

The E-Type that gets the least amount of love

The Jaguar E-Type Series 3 is the ugly duckling of the E-Type family as well as the swansong of the legendary car. It was produced between 1971 and 1975 and came with further body modifications that make it less desirable today than an early S1 example. The S3 you see here was restored and subtly upgraded by E-Type UK, one of the top Jaguar E-Type specialists in the world.

By the dawn of the ’70s, the E-Type was very much like an aging rock star. It’s past its best days but still soldiering on with the same party tricks that made it a hit when it first appeared on the scene. However, the 4.2-liter, inline-six, XK engine was finally showing its age thanks to a string of tougher emission regulations that gradually lowered the power output. Jaguar needed to perform a heart transplant on their legendary sports car and decided their best bet would be the V-12 engine that was originally designed for the XJ sedan. The result wasn’t the much-hyped F-Type (as pundits at the time suggested the new Jag sports car would be called) but the E-Type S3.

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2017 Jaguar E-Type Zero

2017 Jaguar E-Type Zero

Instilling the British icon with electric motivation

Back in March of 1961, Jaguar unveiled the E-Type, and it wasn’t long before the world fell in love with its long hoodline, curvaceous hips, and sonorous 3.8-liter six-cylinder soundtrack. Enzo Ferrari, a man with no shortage of good looking metal at his disposal, remarked that it was the “most beautiful car ever made,” and in the more than half century that followed its release, the E-Type has remained a mainstay of automotive splendor for enthusiasts across the globe. These days, the E-Type has served as the basis for a variety of special editions and reimaginings, but now, JLR is taking its iconic two-door into uncharted water. Say hello to the E-Type Zero, an all-electric iteration that promises the same distinctive driving experience as the original, but with no gasoline involved.

Scheduled for presentation at the Jaguar Land Rover Tech Fest on September 8th, the E-Type Zero was restored and converted by Jaguar Land Rover Classic Works in Coventry, which, JLR points out, isn’t far from “where the [original] E-Type was born.” Based on a 1.5 Series Roadster from 1968, the Zero is an almost completely all-original spec, except for the powertrain, obviously. “Our aim with E-Type Zero is to future-proof classic car ownership,” says Tim Hanning, Director at Jaguar Land Rover Classic. “We’re looking forward to the reaction of our clients as we investigate bringing this concept to market.” That’s right, folks – a production iteration could be in the works. Read on for the details.

Continue reading to learn more about the Jaguar E-Type Zero.

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1961 - 1968 Jaguar E-Type

1961 - 1968 Jaguar E-Type

When talking about cult icons, adjectives usually stream in an overwhelming fashion, making it hard to discern fact from fabrication. The Jaguar E-Type is one of these cars, earning an invitation to the Pantheon of motoring just as quick as the first journalists laid eyes on it. The long hood belied the size of the white two-door sports car as it was sitting on an exquisite animal print wall-to-wall. The public was elated, so much so that a second car was driven from Britain to Switzerland as Sir William Lyons, the company’s founder, was already receiving orders for the new ,,Big Cat’’.

Such was the initial impact of the E-Type that even the Italians, who were famed for putting together some of the most beautiful cars in existence, were left dumbfounded. One Italian in particular eulogized the styling of Jaguar’s new two-seater. His name? None other than Ferrari founder Enzo Ferrari, who is quoted to have said that the XK-E, as it was marketed in the USA, is "the most beautiful car in the world".

Despite of early reliability issues that pushed the debut date of the racing version further into 1962, the E-Type proved handy on race tracks around the world, especially the 12 lightweight chassis. Away from the track, the first E-Type, known as the S1, was built in far greater numbers, nearly 40,000 cars coming out of the Coventry-based plant between 1961 and 1968. The figure includes all variations, including the less fluid 2+2.

While the E-Type stayed in production until 1975, the S1 is the most distinguishable, as the latter versions lost the headlight covers as well as adopting larger fender flares, on the S3, that somehow messed with the original shape. This is mainly why the first iteration is also the most sought-after, with prices rising each year.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1961-1968 Jaguar E-Type.

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2014 Jaguar Lightweight E-Type

2014 Jaguar Lightweight E-Type

Two years after unveiling the E-Type — built between 1961 and 1975, and known as one of the most beautiful vehicles ever designed — the folks at Jaguar rolled out a lighter version of the model specifically developed for racing. Dubbed E-Type Lightweight, it featured an all-aluminum body and engine block, and had most of its interior trim removed, making it 250 pounds lighter than the standard E-Type. Only 12 units of this track-purpose vehicles were built, although Jaguar’s initial plan was to conceive 18 of them. Believe it or not, the Brits have just decided to make use of the remaining designated chassis numbers and construct six more Lightweight E-Types exactly 50 years after the final original example left the factory.

The mission of recreating these race cars to their original specifications based on already designated chassis numbers had fallen into the hands of Jaguar Land Rover’s Special Vehicle Operations, the same performance arm that developed the F-Type Project 7 and the Range Rover Sport SVR. An authentic blast from the past, the Lightweight E-Type comes with everything the classic racer had to offer, including an aluminum-block, straight-six engine and a stripped out interior. And if you think the "new" Lightweight E-Type is nothing more than a museum piece, you’d better think again. The sports cars have been built to FIA’s homologation requirements for historic racing, meaning we should be seeing them in action during events such as the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

Update 8/12/2014: Just as suspected after Jaguar Land Rover revealed the Range Rover SVR ahead of its Pebble Beach debut, JLR has chosen to also reveal the much-anticipated "New" Lightweight E-Type prototype — dubbed "Car Zero" ahead of its Pebble Beach debut. Check out all of the details after the jump.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Jaguar Lightweight E-Type.

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2013 Jaguar Eagle Low Drag GT

2013 Jaguar Eagle Low Drag GT

As the Jaguar product renaissance continues full-steam ahead with the XQ-type crossover’s reveal, there is even more excitement back home with the debut of the Eagle Low Drag GT.

Sharing the lawn with dozens of other priceless exotics, the Eagle Low Drag GT applies the same priceless supercar restoration and upgrade that makes its Speedster such a showstopper.

Finished in gorgeous hand-polished aluminum for the panels and chassis, the Low Drag GT revives one of the most celebrated Jaguar racing concepts ever: a fastback E-type that was wider, more powerful and far more streamlined than any production Jaguar coupe from then or now.

The original E-type was many things during its prime, including a super-rapid, high-speed express that could reach huge top speeds for a fraction of the price of its competition from Italy.

For all this beauty and heritage that flows into the F-type today, the E-type was surprisingly never a truly successful racing machine or a good-looking two-seat coupe.

As Jaguar puts the final touches on the F-type Coupe ahead of its arrival this spring, the Eagle Low Drag GT is the perfect example of Jaguar fastback style.

With pricing likely to be in the seven digits and a total production run of perhaps five cars, the 2013 Eagle Low Drag GT writes a new chapter in the celebrated Jaguar E-type legacy.

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2011 Eagle E-Type Lightweight Speedster

2011 Eagle E-Type Lightweight Speedster

Two years ago, British manufacturer Eagle introduced the world to their rendition of the Jaguar E-type with the E-Type Speedster at the Salon Prive. The car was light, fast, and it gave the driver hassle-free driving when compared to the E-Types of yesteryear. Now the company has reworked their modern day classic with an even lighter version called the Eagle E-Type Lightweight Speedster, scheduled to make its debut at the Salon Prive at Syon House in west London on June 22-24, 2011

Eagle is well-known for their dedication to the development of Jaguar’s E-Types and have been restoring and selling them since 1982. Their passion for the E-Type is what lead them to create a model that throws back to the design of Jaguar’s Lightweight E-Type race cars built in 1963, but with a modern twist and a more powerful engine.

The Eagle Lightweight Speedster only weighs 2,200 lbs and that weight is powered by a 4.7 liter, aluminum in line 6 cylinder engine that delivers an impressive 310 HP with a peak torque of 340 lb-ft.

UPDATE 07/09/12: The folks over at Eagle Speedster have released a fresh batch of high-res photos of the gorgeous sports car, which you can check out in the gallery!

Hit the jump to read more about the Eagle E-Type Lightweight Speedster.

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1964 Jaguar Lindner Nocker Low Drag E-Type

1964 Jaguar Lindner Nocker Low Drag E-Type

This is the one and only factory low-drag lightweightJaguar E-Type and is a vehicle that should have been laid to rest a long time ago. In fact, the Jaguar was thought to be dead until Peter Neumark of Classic Motors Cars breathed new life into the last racing car ever built at Jaguar’s factory.

Only twelve lightweight E-types were built by Jaguar’s competition department back in 1963, but only one returned to undergo preparatory work for the LeMans race later that year. Malcolm Sayer designed the vehicle to have a special low drag body that would be coupled to a highly modified engine. This combination was set to take LeMans by storm and lead driver, Peter Lindner, to victory. Unfortunately, while on the Montlhery circuit, something went terribly wrong causing a crash that would end up killing Peter Lindner and destroying the Jaguar E-type. Sayer himself said that the vehicle could not be repaired and that opinion was echoed in the 1970s when a second survey confirmed the vehicle’s fate.

Fast forward to 2007 when Peter Neumark entered the scene. Determined to revive the crumpled E-Type, Neumark set out to make history with one of the most complex restorations to ever take place in the world.

Hit the jump to see what dedication, passion, and 7,000 hours of hard work can accomplish.

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