Jeep created a furore when it launched the 2020 Gladiator. People love Jeep and it was a great moment for the enthusiasts to see a Jeep-branded truck return after almost three decades. Even though the concept truck was launched in 2005, it took the company almost 15 years to finally come up with the final production version, but it was worth the wait. In fact, Jeep wanted to capitalize on this hype and decided to bring five Gladiator based concepts to the 2019 Easter Jeep Safari; even if that meant taking that Wrangler off the grid this year. Even though the 2020 Gladiator is underpinned by the Wrangler’s platform, it is much more than just ’a Wrangler with a bed’. Jeep has launched the 2020 Gladiator is four different trims: Sport, Sport S, Overland, and Rubicon. There was a Launch Edition limited to 4,190 units as well, but for now, we’re going to focus on the standard trim levels and what boxes you should check when you’re filling out your order form.

2020 Jeep Gladiator Trim Levels

2020 Jeep Gladiator Sport

Jeep Gladiator Configurator - What You Need and What You Don't
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The 2020 Jeep Gladiator Sport is the entry-level trim. In terms of exterior, you cannot mistake it for anything but a Jeep. All the trims look more-or-less the same. The Sport trim comes with removable doors and roof. The steel bed is offered with a tailgate that can be operated in three different positions. It rides on 17-inch black steel wheels as standard. Being a pickup truck and the base trim, the Gladiator Sport is not feature-rich on the inside. Yes, there is an air-conditioner, a five-inch touchscreen display with USB and Aux support, and a rear back-up camera, but that’s pretty much it.

The Gladiator Sport carries a 3.6-liter, V-6 engine that develops 285 ponies and 260 pound-feet of twist. This is the same mill that is present under the hood of the Jeep Wrangler as well. Power is sent to all wheels via a six-speed manual gearbox (Yay!). An eight-speed automatic transmission is optional. The output figures may not make you go ’wow,’ but Jeep has focused on low-end torque and a broad torque range to begin with. The 2020 Jeep Gladiator Sport can tow up to 7,650 pounds and comes with a payload capacity of 1,600 pounds. The Gladiator Sport is priced at $35,040, including destination charges. From what it’s worth, the 2020 Gladiator Sport is quite expensive for what it offers. But hey, it’s a Gladiator at the end of the day. Period.

2020 Jeep Gladiator Sport S

Jeep Gladiator Configurator - What You Need and What You Don't
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If you’re looking to purchase the Gladiator, this is the trim you should start looking at. The Sport trim will get you the basic, barebone structure, but the Sport S will come with a few niceties that are necessary today. On the outside, it is largely similar to the Sport trim itself, but it comes with a different set of wheels. The dimensions remain the same, however, this trim is dressed with Tech Silver Aluminum Wheels. They look much fancier and improve the overall aesthetics of the truck more than you can imagine. The truck bed also features a 115-Volt power outlet.

On the inside, the Sport S feels a little better and more in place with modern cars. It comes with power windows, power locking for the tailgate and doors, heated mirrors, and a seven-inch touchscreen UConnect 4 system that supports Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. Under the hood is the same 3.6-liter, V-6 engine that churns out 285 horses and 260 pound-feet of torque. Even the towing and payload capacities are rated the same as the Sport trim - 7,650 and 1,600 pounds, respectively. The 2020 Jeep Gladiator Sport S is priced at $38,240, including destination charges. For $3,000, you get a lot more features over the Sport trim, and it’s honestly worth every extra penny.

2020 Jeep Gladiator Overland

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Now, this is the most practical trim if you have a mixed usage pattern comprising of tarmac drive as well as off-road adventures. As is with all Jeep models, all the trims in the range look similar to each other, and the same applies to the Gladiator as well. The biggest differentiating factor here is the set of 18-Inch Granite Crystal Aluminum Wheels wrapped in 32-inch tires that not only look stunning but also drive well on tarmac and unknown terrains alike. The Overland trims also benefit from automatic halogen headlamps and front fog lamps as well. You will also find side-steps and body-colored fenders.

Step inside, and you will see a full-fledged, functional cabin that ticks all the boxes. Other than all the features from the Sport S, the Overland trim receives better optional packages, such as a bigger 8.4-inch UConnect touchscreen system with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility, leather-trimmed seats, etc. All the lights inside are LEDs, thus making for a bright cabin. As for the engine specs, it drives on the same 3.6-liter, V-6 mill as seen on the other trims. Even here, the six-speed manual gearbox comes as standard, and an eight-speed automatic gearbox is optional. The engine is quite refined this time, and it mates well with the bigger 18-inch tires on this trim. In fact, the Gladiator can comfortably cruise at 80 mph all day without tiring the passengers or the driver. The maximum towing capacity in the Overland drops to 6,000 pounds, and the Payload capacity is rated at 1,140 pounds. The 2020 Gladiator Overland is priced at $41,890, including destination charges, and this is the trim that we would recommend.

2020 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon

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Expect the Rubicon to fulfill all your wishes and desires as this is the best Gladiator that Jeep has to offer. Apart from the prominent ’Rubicon’ decal on the side of the bonnet, this trim drives on 33-inch Falken All-terrain Wildpeak tires and high-clearance fender flares. You know what that’s for (wink!). A vented Rubicon hood and steel off-road rock rails are offered for the cab and truck bed. Although all-terrain, these tires are quite noisy when driven at high speeds on smooth surfaces. On the inside, the Rubicon is the same as the Overland, except for even more available options such as a TrailCam off-road camera.

All the action in the Rubicon lies in the mechanicals. But before we dive into it, let me repeat the same thing for the final time. The Rubicon, just like the Sport, Sport S, and Overland trims, is powered by the 3.6-liter, V-6 Pentastar engine that produces 285 ponies and 260 pound-feet of torque. It comes mated with a six-speed manual transmission as standard and is also offered with an eight-speed automatic gearbox as optional. In the Rubicon trim, Jeep has installed Rock-Trac 4x4 System with up to 84:1 crawl ratio. This trim also benefits from stuff like a two-speed transfer case, an electronic sway bar disconnect, locking front and rear differentials, and FOX shocks. Jeep has introduced a new Off-Road+ mode that can adjust the throttle, transmission, and stability control depending on the situation. For instance, when you put the Gladiator in 4WD low, it slows to maneuver rocks and boulders and better navigate through the rougher stuff at lower speeds. In 4WD high mode, it sets itself for higher-speed performance and pretty much replicates a Land Cruiser’s performance in the deserts of UAE. The 2020 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon is priced at $45,040, including destination charges.

2020 Jeep Gladiator Model Pricing
Starting Model Net Price
2020 Jeep Gladiator Sport $35,040
 2020 Jeep Gladiator Sport S $38,240
2020 Jeep Gladiator Overland $41,890
 2020 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon $45,040

Powertrain Options

Standard Features

The Jeep Gladiator is offered with a 3.6-liter, V-6 Pentastar engine borrowed from the Wrangler. The power output figures remain the same as well - 285 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. Power is sent to all the wheels via a six-speed manual gearbox. For people who prefer a transmission without the third pedal, Jeep has offered an eight-speed automatic gearbox as an option. While a more powerful engine would have been preferred, this V-6 engine was tweaked to offer a wider torque band and better torque on lower speeds. This is more of a necessity in a pickup truck since a powerful low-end torque helps you guide through rough terrains and inclines comfortably, and also when you have to move with cargo hauled on your ass from a standstill.

Currently, the Jeep Gladiator is offered with only one engine option. However, Jeep has said that starting 2020, a 3.0-liter EcoDiesel mill that produces 260 horses and 442 pound-feet of torque will be available as well. We have seen this engine under the hood of the Grand Cherokee and the Ram 1500. It will be mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission as standard. If you’re hoping for the Wrangler’s 2.0-liter, four-cylinder turbocharged engine to make its way under the hood of the Gladiator, you will be disappointed to know that Jeep has no plans of introducing it here.

Available Options and What You Really Need

Transmission

Six-Speed Manual - Included

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The 2020 Jeep Gladiator’s mill is mated to a six-speed manual gearbox as standard. I honestly think that Jeep did a great job by offering a manual gearbox on the Gladiator. People have been anticipating the Gladiator ever since Jeep stopped its production in 1988. The enthusiasts and purists should be given credit for pushing Jeep to bring the Gladiator back. Had it not been for their desire and anticipation for a Jeep-badged pickup truck, you wouldn’t be reading this article. And, it goes unsaid that any hardcore off-roading enthusiast would prefer a truck with manual transmission over an automatic gearbox 365 days a year.

A manual gearbox makes more sense in a truck like Gladiator. This is not a vehicle you would drive in city traffic on a daily basis, or take it to your office every day, or even go on long journeys with family every now and then. For a truck to be driven over alien objects and rough terrains, you need to have complete control over it; and a manual gearbox does exactly that. A third pedal helps you control the acceleration in a much better manner an automatic gearbox. Not to mention, off-roading is all about controlling your truck precisely at lower speeds.

Eight-Speed 850RE Automatic - $2,000

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Jeep may have introduced a manual gearbox as standard, but the automaker realizes that not everyone likes a third pedal. In fact, the majority of the new generation kids don’t even know how to drive a vehicle with a C-pedal. And, let’s be honest here; Jeep is not pleasing the enthusiasts here. The company obviously focuses on the financial aspect and the sales volume of the Gladiator. Hence, offering an automatic transmission was imperative here.

For a lot of people, the Gladiator will not be about hardcore off-roading. Perhaps, they would prefer mild off-roading once in a while with friends on a Sunday morning. But that is pretty much it. These folks would not want to compromise the ease of an automatic gearbox just for a few hours of fun. Hence, the company has offered an eight-speed automatic gearbox on the 2020 Jeep Gladiator as an option. An automatic gearbox would be a lot more convenient for driving it in the city and on smooth tarmac. For $2,000, you can avail this automatic gearbox.

A little brief on the transmission - This is a ZF-manufactured gearbox and has been present in the market for more than 10 years now. It made its debut in the BMW 7 Series but has trickled down to many other brands, including Jeep. Jeep’s parent company, FCA, has the license to build this transmission in its Kokomo transmission plant in Indiana.

Trac-Lok Anti-Spin Rear Differential - $595

Rear Axle Ratio

3.73 Rear Axle Ratio - Included

Jeep has offered this axle ratio as standard on the Gladiator. This ratio is offered considering a mix of highway trips and adventurous drives. If you will be cruising a lot on the highways, the standard axle ratio will give you the best fuel economy by lowering the number of revolutions per minute the engine turns for each turn of the axle or axles. This does not strain the engine, thus improving efficiency and economy. However, if you intend to drive it with heavy trailers hitched to the back of the truck, or you will be using it for hardcore off-roading, the stock rear axle ratio will not suffice.

4.10 Rear Axle Ratio - Other Options Needed - $2,995

(Must Have $2,000 Eight-Speed Auto and $995Max Tow Package)

The 4.10 Rear axle ratio will improve acceleration while climbing grades, conquering the uneven terrains, and carrying heavy loads with ease. However, this will affect your highway cruising to a large extent, and will also require you to visit the fuel pumps regularly. This comes standard in the Rubicon, but not on the other three trims, and you cannot solely just get this fixed. To install the 4.10 rear axle ratio, you will have to upgrade to the eight-speed automatic transmission as well as Max Tow Package. The Max Tow Package includes a 240-ampere alternator, 17-inch all terrain tires with speed limited to 110 mph, a Class IV receiver hitch that basically unlocks the hulk-mode and allows you to tow heavy stuff, and of course, the 4.10 Rear axle ratio. Apart from this, a Heavy duty dana 44 wide front and rear axles, heavy duty engine cooling, and molded-in-color fender flares are also included.

Engine Block Heater - $95

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This is really helpful if you live in cold-conditions. Maintaining a Jeep is no joke, and you have to take precautions right from the beginning. An engine block heater helps the engine and the engine oil warm up so that it’s easier to fire up the engine. This also helps reduce the start up wear. When you cold-start an engine, there are high chances of the piston rings getting damaged as the excess fuel wipes off the oil from the cylinder walls and does not lubricate the walls and the camshaft well. So, if you live in cold weather conditions, do install this product.

Optional Packages and What You Really Need

7-Inch Radio Group (Sport S Only

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This package is available only on the Sport S trim. The Sport S comes with a five-inch UConnect 3 display as standard. If you plan to upgrade it to a seven-inch touchscreen, Jeep also shoves the ’Convenience Group’ and ’Cold Weather Group’ along with it. This package comes with its own baggage, whether you like it or not. The Convenience Group basically includes a universal garage door opener and a remote start system. This allows you to fire up your engine from 90 meters away and cools or heats the Jeep accordingly. It depends on what temperature you have preset on the Automatic Temperature Control system. However, you cannot install this if you have a manual gearbox in your Jeep. The Cold Weather Group, on the other hand, consists of heated front seats and a heated steering wheel.

8.4-Inch Radio Group (Overland and Higher) - $1,595

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This Package is not as complicated as the 7-inch Radio Group. The Overland and the Rubicon trims are offered with a seven-inch UConnect system as standard. For $1,595, you can have yourself loads of little things that are worth every penny. This package includes:

  • An 8.4-inch touchscreen display that supports Android Auto and Apple CarPlay
  • A nine-speaker Alpine audio system that includes a rear-subwoofer and a 12-channel amplifier
  • Sirius Travel Link, Guardian, Traffic Service, and Travel Plus
  • HD Radio
  • GPS Navigation
  • Emergency/Assistance Call
  • Rear View Auto Dimming Mirror

Premium LED Lighting (Overland and Higher) - $995

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This is not exactly a must-have package, but it would be nice to have it on your Jeep Gladiator. This package includes Daytime Running Lamp Accents, Reflector Headlamps, Front Fog Lamps, Front Turn Signal and Parking Lamps, and Taillamps - all LEDs of course. For me, it would’ve been a complete package if Jeep offered Projector headlamps instead of reflectors. But we can’t have the cake and eat it too, can you?

Convenience Group (Sport S $395

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We have discussed this in the 7-inch Radio Group, but let’s touch base with it again. This package includes a universal garage door opener and a remote start system. The remote start system allows you to fire up your engine from 90 meters away, and cools or heats the Jeep, depending on what temperature you have preset on the Automatic Temperature Control system. This is quite helpful when you live in extreme weather conditions or leave your car in environments like open parking lots. A nice feature to have if you’ll be using your Jeep Gladiator on a daily basis.

Cold Weather Group (Sport S and Higher $695

Jeep Gladiator Configurator - What You Need and What You Don't
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The Cold Weather Group consists of heated front seats and heated steering wheel, and the same remote start system as seen in the Convenience Group package. We would strongly recommend the Cold Weather Group if you live in cold-weather places. The benefits are self-explanatory, but having this will make your long-term ownership a happy one.

Jeep Active Safety Group (Sport S and Higher) - $995

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The Active Safety Group is one of the few packages that has incorporated safety features for the Jeep Gladiator. The package includes just three things - Blind Spot and Cross-Path Detection, LED taillamps, and Rear park assist system. While you cannot really put a price on safety, these are the things I would have expected to be standard on the Jeep Gladiator. So, it seems like a rip-off that Jeep is charging a thousand bucks for something that should have existed in the first place.

Adaptive Cruise\ Forward Collision (Sport S and Higher) - $795

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This safety package makes more sense than the Active Safety Group, and also because you cannot expect Jeep to offer these things as standard. This package includes Forward Collision Warning-Plus that works in tandem with Advanced Brake Assist which applies brakes with maximum force in response to the signal sent by the Forward Collision warning if it detects that the driver has not applied them sufficiently. There is also an Enhanced Adaptive Cruise Control for manual transmission Gladiators and an Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop for the automatic gearbox truck. Although both the Cruise Controls work the same way, the only difference is that the one in manual deactivates as soon as the speed goes below 15 mph because the Jeep cannot change gears itself, whereas the one in the automatic truck will be able to bring it to a complete halt. A must-have feature, I reckon, if you will be driving this on the highways.

Cargo Management Group with Trail Rail System (Sport S and Higher) - $895

Jeep Gladiator Configurator - What You Need and What You Don't
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If you are looking to use this truck for hauling stuff on a regular basis, this package will interest you. It includes a 240-Ampere Alternator, 400W Inverter, 115-Volt AC Outlet in the bed, and Lockable Rear Underseat Storage. It also includes rails on the walls and the sides of the bed to help tie down your stuff safely. Remember the case where a trash can flew off the truck on a highway because it wasn’t tied down properly? Well, you wouldn’t want that happening to you! Nevertheless, Jeep seems to have priced it on the higher side.

Trailer Tow Package - $250

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Irrespective of how often you will use your Gladiator for towing, we would recommend you to go for this anyway. This package gets you a 240-Ampere alternator, heavy duty engine cooling, a Class IV receiver hitch that’s mounted to the frame and allows you to tow heavier loads, and a trailer hitch zoom. A trailer hitch zoom is applicable if you have a rear back up camera installed as it is basically just a zoom feature that allows you to get a view of the things behind the trailer as well.

Max Tow Package with 4.10 Axle Ratio - $995

Jeep Gladiator Configurator - What You Need and What You Don't
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We explained this in the "rear axle ratio -> 4.10 axle ratio" section, but let’s have it here once again. This package will help solve your heavy off-roading problems, and you will clearly see a difference. The highlight of this package is the 4.10 Rear axle ratio that will improve acceleration while climbing grades, uneven terrains, and carrying heavy loads. However, this will affect your highway cruising to a large extent and will bring down the fuel economy. This comes standard in the Rubicon, but not on the other three trims. The Max Tow Package includes a 240-ampere alternator, 17-inch all terrain tires with speed limited to 110 mph, a Class IV receiver hitch that basically unlocks the hulk-mode and allows you to tow heavy stuff, and of course, the 4.10 Rear axle ratio. Apart from this, a Heavy duty dana 44 wide front and rear axles, heavy duty engine cooling, and molded-in-color fender flares are also included.

Auxiliary Switch Group $295

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Auxiliary Switch Group can be described as a precautionary package from failed batteries and electrical. It consists of a 240-Amp Alternator that helps charge the battery and also supplies additional power for the vehicle’s electrical components, a 700-Amp Maintenance Free Battery, and four Programmable Auxiliary Switches. If you plan to use this truck only over the weekends, we would suggest you spend $295 on this package.

Smokers Group - $30

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For the cigarette aficionados, here’s a package that includes a cigar lighter and a removable ash tray. No more, no less.

Exterior Options and What You Really Need

Exterior Colors

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The Gladiator is offered in 10 different exterior shades, irrespective of the trim. Nine of these are clear coat colors, whereas one is a pearl coat. Three of these 10 are metallic, while the rest are solid colors. The best part about this is that Jeep doesn’t charge an extra nickel for any color you choose. The colors include:

  • Black
  • Gator
  • Gobi
  • Bright White
  • Sting Gray
  • Firecracker Red
  • Hydro Blue (Pearl Coat)
  • Billet Silver Metallic
  • Granite Crystal Metallic
  • Punk’n Metallic

If you need something funky and attention-seeking, nothing beats the Punk’n Orange! So, this would be my pick of the lot for the Sport, Sport S, and Overland. But I would choose the Hydro Blue for the Rubicon because orange is synonymous with Rubicon-trim Jeeps.

2020 Jeep Gladiator Color Options
Color Cost Availability
Black Clear-Coat Included At Launch
Granite Crystal Metalic Clear-Coat Included At Launch
Sting-Gray Clear-Coat Included Late Availability
Billet Silver Metallic Clear-Coat Included At Launch
Hydro Blue-Pearl Clear-Coat Included Late Availability
Firecracker Red Clear-Coat Included At Launch
Punk'n Metallic Clear-Coat Included Late Availability
Gator Clear-Coat Included Late Availability
Gobi Clear-Coat Included Late Availability
Bright White Clear-Coat Included At Launch

Other Exterior Options

Black Freedom 3-Piece Hardtop - $1,195

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For people who like the convertible experience but loathe the soft tops, here’s Jeep’s solution for you. This is a three-piece black hardtop that features two lightweight Freedom panels. These panels are placed over the front seats and can be removed easily and stowed in the Freedom Panel Storage Bag. This bag comes included in the package along with Rear Sliding Window and Rear Window Defroster. Not a bad way to enjoy a drive. You can get this on any Gladiator trim.

Dual Top Group (Sport S and Higher) - $2,295

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The Dual Top Group is for the fickle-minded folks who cannot decide whether they like it open, with a hard top or a soft top. With this package, you can get a Black Freedom three-piece hard top and a black Sunrider soft top. I feel this is quite expensive and may not find a lot of buyers, but Jeep has offered it for the few who would opt for it.

Premium Black Sunrider Soft Top (Sport S and Higher) - $595

Jeep Gladiator Configurator - What You Need and What You Don't
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Unlike the hard top which can be availed in the body color, the Sunrider soft top is sold in just black color. Again, priced a little high for what is being offered here.

245/75R17 All-Terrain Tires

These tires are available only on the Sport and the Sport S trims since the Overland and Rubicon use 18-inch wheels. The two entry-level trims ride on 245/75R17 All-Season Tires as standard. To get these tires fixed on your Jeep, you need to add the Trac-Loc Anti-Spin Rear Differential that increases the price by $595. Too bad if you only want the tires and not the anti-spin rear differential.

Deep Tint Sunscreen Windows - $495

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This is a total rip-off by all means. Jeep offers tint sunscreen windows as standard that protects you from harmful UV rays. For 500 bucks, Jeep is going to give you a darker shade of the same window. Is it worth it? Not to mention, this reduces visibility in the dark to a large extent.

Roll-up Tonneau Cover - $495

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A roll-up cover at this price seems worth it as you can be assured of a perfect fit and finish. The cover would last long as it is straight from the company. Even if you don’t use the truck bed a lot, this is a nice piece of equipment to have installed on your Jeep Gladiator. As the name suggests, the cover can be rolled up when not in use. As an alternative, you can also look out for tri-fold covers that are a pain to install but will last longer and can bear God’s wrath (snow, rains, etc.) for longer.

Spray-in Bed Liner - $495

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The truck beds are prone to damage, and getting a spray-in bed liner is always a good precaution to have. It creates an anti-skid surface that let the cargo be in place. It also helps prevent rusting and scratching, thus giving the bed a longer life.

Side Steps (Sport and Sport S) - $695

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The side steps are available as an official accessory for the trims that don’t feature them as standard. These side steps feature a molded tread pattern that literally works like anti-skid surfaces, making it easier to get in and out of the vehicle. Not a bad accessory to have if you have shorter folks or kids in the family.

Interior Options and What You Really Need

Black Interior Color - Standard

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If you’re talking about an off-roader, an all-black interior is the most logical choice. Fortunately, Jeep did not try to mess around with the Gladiator variants by offering beige interiors or any such light colors. All the trims comes with black interior as standard, and in my opinion, is best suited to the truck if you intend on taking it for off-roading regularly. However, it can feel a little claustrophobic, especially if you opt for the deep tint sunscreen windows from the accessories list.

Black/Heritage Tan Interior

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Jeep offers a heritage tan interior as well on the Jeep Gladiator; and the best part, it’s free of cost. You can either choose to go with the all-black interior or the heritage tan interior. What makes it even better is that the dash area remains black and it’s only the seats that get the tan treatment.

Leather Trim Bucket Seats (Overland and Higher) - $1,495

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The Overland Rubicon trims can be availed with leather trim bucket seats. Well, for trims as well equipped for off-roading as the these two, I would have kept the regular seats as standard. The leather trims do add a lot of character to the cabin and brighten it up as well. Jeep offers the leather trim bucket seats with two different choices - Black interior color and black dark saddle interior color. The leather bucket seats cannot be had with black/heritage tan interior, obviously. If you are looking to drive this in the city and on highways often, going for these seats wouldn’t be the worst idea. It seems to be worth its money.

SiriusXM and 1-Year Subscription - $295

The Sirius XM Satellite Radio is offered by the automaker for the Gladiator at the cost of $295 per annum. It basically consists of 150 channels that covers ad-free music, sports, news, etc. You can even listen to it online, and on the connected devices as well. While I am a radio fan myself, I don’t think I would opt for this. Perhaps, Jeep realizes that convincing a customer would be tough, that’s why it offers a new Jeep Gladiator with a one-year subscription of the Sirius XM.

All-Weather Slush Mats - $150

These mats, in an off-roader especially, are worth every penny. Gladiator, or any Jeep for that matter, does not feature tight panel gaps as in sedans and hatches. There is always a way for water or mud to sneak into the cabin. For $150, these mats help you protect your carpet by holding water, mud, snow, and the likes. They feature deep ribs and are a must-have accessory even if you won’t use your Gladiator much for off-roading.

Wireless Bluetooth Speaker (Sport S and Higher) - $295

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Quite a funky accessory that will help you conclude those after-drive parties on a high. Jeep has clearly ’innovated’ this product keeping in mind that you will go out trekking and camping with this truck. The bluetooth speaker comes with its docking station behind the rear seat and is charged using the Gladiator’s battery. The best part is that you can even pair to another Gladiator to play the left and right audio. Imagine parking the two Gladiators on either sides and dancing in between. I would suggest you to ’pickup’ this accessory and have a blast! While you can easily buy this on the Overland and the Rubicon trims, you will need to have either the seven-inch radio group or the Alpine Premium Audio System in the Sport S trim.

Alpine Premium Audio System (Sport S and Higher) - $1,295

This will lure the audiophiles for sure. The Alpine system comes with nine speakers including a rear subwoofer and a 552W, 12-channel amplifier. There would be no harm in looking around and opting for aftermarket branded speakers. For $1,300, there are plenty of good options worth considering. But before you do that, there’s a catch. The Alpine system is a must-have to have stuff like a wireless Bluetooth speaker (if you don’t opt for the seven-inch screen in the Sport S trim). However, if you’re hell-bent on getting the Alpine system, we’d rather recommend you to shell out 300 bucks more and get the 8.4-inch Radio Group that offers a lot more value.

Soft Top Window Storage Bag (Sport S and Higher) - $75

This is a storage bag for you to remove your Sunrider soft top, wrap it up, and put it in this special storage bag. It makes sense to have if you have a Premium Black Sunrider Soft top or the Dual Top Group. Shouldn’t the Dual Top Group come with a storage bag anyway? Well, not as per the configurator. This an expensive product per se, but it’s not some sort of a souvenir to keep in your showcase, is it?

Hardtop Headliner (Sport S and Higher) - $555

The headliner is essentially a layer of insulation on the hood that does not let the heat creep inside the cabin in summers, and keeps the heat inside when it’s cold outside. This is quite efficient if you live in places with extreme conditions. Not just this, the headliner also helps dampen noise inside the cabin. The wind noises are reduced to an extent when you are driving at fairly high speeds. In fact, it also complements the audio system in creating a soothing-acoustic experience. Although an expensive buy at $555, it is not a bad thing to have if such small things bother you.

Remote Proximity Keyless Entry (Overland and Higher) - $495

This is one feature a lot of us wish to have in our vehicles, but not many companies offer it as an accessory. Remote proximity keyless entry unlocks your truck without the need for you to insert the key physically or press a button the remote. All you have to do is touch the driver or passenger door handle with the key fob in close proximity to unlock the doors. However, this is available only in the Overland and Rubicon trims.

Remote Start (Overland and Higher) - $495

A nifty feature to have in a car, and quite a useful one as well. This allows you to fire up your engine from 90 meters (300 feet) away and cools or heats the Jeep accordingly. It depends on what temperature you have preset on the Automatic Temperature Control system. It’s not just the air-conditioner; if you equip your Gladiator heated driver seat and steering wheel, you can use this feature for them as well. However, you cannot install this if you have a manual gearbox in your Jeep because the car cannot start itself in any gear but neutral.

Winch-Capable Front Bumper (Rubicon Only) - $695

If you are buying a Rubicon Gladiator, you will definitely have your eyes set on this. This is a lot more different than the regular bumper. The winch-capable steel bumper can accommodate a winch - which is a pulling device, consisting of a wound cable, or rope and a motor, that mounts to the front bumper. This bumper will be extremely helpful to help you pull out of a tough situation, or to help pull out other vehicles. Although a must-have feature, we must ’Warn’ you that there are many other brands that offer more accomplished products.

Body Color Fender Flares (Rubicon Only) - $495

This is a Rubicon-exclusive accessory that changes the look of the truck by a large extent. It is purely for aesthetics purpose and does not help in the functionality in any way. The body colored fenders do make the trim stand out from the other lower trims. For 500 bucks, it is not a reasonable buy as the Rubicon has a lot of differentiating factors anyway that will make your Gladiator stand out from the Sport, Sport S, and Overland trims.

How we’d configure it

How We'd Configure a 2020 Jeep Gladiator Work Truck
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How We’d Configure a 2020 Jeep Gladiator Work Truck

How We'd Configure an Off-Road 2020 Jeep Gladiator
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How We’d Configure an Off-Road 2020 Jeep Gladiator

How We'd Configure a 2020 Jeep Gladiator Daily Driver
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How We’d Configure a 2020 Jeep Gladiator Daily Driver

2020 Jeep Gladiator specifications

Engine 3.6-LITER PENTASTAR V-6
Type and Description 60-degree, V-type, liquid-cooled
Displacement (cu. in. / cc) 220 cu. in. (3,604 cu. cm)
Bore x Stroke 3.78 x 3.27 (96 x 83)
Valve System Chain-driven DOHC, 24 valves and hydraulic end-pivot roller rockers
Fuel Injection Sequential, multiport, electronic, returnless
Construction Aluminum deep-skirt block, aluminum alloy heads
Compression Ratio 11.3:1
Power 285 HP @ 6,400 RPM
Torque 260 LB-FT @ 4,400 RPM

Further reading

2020 Jeep Gladiator Exterior
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Read our full review on the 2020 Jeep Gladiator.

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