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2016 Jensen GT

2016 Jensen GT

It has been almost 40 years since the last Jensen Interceptor was produced and more than a decade since the short-lived Jensen SV-8, but it looks like there might finally be some hope for the sporty British automaker to make a full comeback. The Jensen Group has just released a pair of images showing a full-scale clay model of its upcoming Jensen GT, and while few details were released about the car, Evo Magazine seems to have some of the car’s juicier details.

According to the official press release, this “extremely limited edition” Jensen GT will “fill the gap between the last true Jensen, the Interceptor of 1976, and an all-new, state-of-the-art car due to be revealed in 2016.” I’m still taking this news with a bit of skepticism until there’s an actual working car, but it is definitely a promising development for Jensen fans.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Jensen GT.

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Tribute To 1954 Jensen 541: Video

Tribute To 1954 Jensen 541: Video

Great Britain was once home to a great number of sports car manufacturers. At one point, the Brits even rivaled the Italians on both the streets and the race tracks, until several UK-based companies began going under and having their factories closed. Jensen Motors is one of these. Founded in 1934, it made a name for itself by building both commercial vehicles and light sports cars. It’s most iconic cars were the CV8, which used 5.9- and 6.3-liter, Chrysler V-8 engines, and the Interceptor. Sold between 1966 and 1976, the Interceptor also used Chrysler-sourced engines, including the massive 7.2-liter RB block, making it the most powerful "hybrid" to blend European styling with American oomph. Unfortunately, the Interceptor wasn’t successful enough to keep Jensen from going under in 1976 and joining the long list of British automakers that succumbed in the second half of the 20th century.

Fortunately, several Jensen cars became full-fledged classics as early as the 1990s, encouraging enthusiasts to buy and restore them, and parade them across Britain. One such car is the 541, a grand tourer that Jensen built only 127 of between 1960 and 1963. Manufactured only with right-hand drive, all 541 were sold in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Nowadays, however, a bunch of them have made it across the English Channel to other European countries. Interestingly enough. one even made it to Italy, a country otherwise known to favor local classics from the likes of Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati, Lancia and Alfa Romeo.

The owner of the blue coupe you’re about to see is Gianfranco Giovine, perhaps the only Italian to fall in love with the Jensen 541 and buy one, waiting no fewer than four weeks to have it shipped from Ireland in 2011. "I was awestruck by the beauty of this car, by its curves, by the sound of its engine," Giovine told Petrolicious, adding that the 541 was a car that put him in a position "to chase it as if it were a beautiful woman." I must admit I never thought an Italian could fall in love with a British car that’s not an Aston Martin or a Jaguar, but it seems love has its ways when it comes to automobiles too. Click the play button above to find out more about Gianfranco’s love affair with the Jensen 541.

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Video: Ferrari FF vs. Jensen FF

Video: Ferrari FF vs. Jensen FF

When two cars have the same name, it’s almost necessary to pin them against each other in some type of race. This is what ClassicDriverTV has done with the new Ferrari FF and the old Jensen FF.

Ferrari’s latest sports car creation is a 651 HP four-seater with the cleverest of part-time 4wd systems and 200mph+ performance. The Jensen FF was produced by British manufacturer, Jensen Motors, between 1966 and 1971. It was powered by a 7.0 liter Hemi engine imported from Chrysler that delivered a total of 390 HP.

The two sports cars were put face to face in the snow in Engadin Valley. With the vast power difference between the Ferrari and the Jensen, it seems to be quite clear who the victor was, but having the two cars broken down bit by bit is still an interesting watch!

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CPP Global to build the new Jensen Interceptor

CPP Global to build the new Jensen Interceptor

The new Jensen Interceptor - called the Interceptor R - is scheduled to be launched at some point next year, although we’ve just received fresh details about the project. One of the more important new details is that CPP Global Holdings, the British group that bought Bowler earlier this year, will be in charge of developing and building the Interceptor R. Eventually, CPP will also be in on finalizing and assembling the car in 2014.

In addition to its acquisition of Bowler, CPP is in talks to purchase Dutch supercar brand, Spyker. With all of this swirling around CPP, there’s no doubt that the company is fast becoming a name in the industry. Currently, the company has over 250 auto specialists, technicians, and craftsmen in its fold.

The original Jensen Interceptor was a GT-class car that was completely hand-built by Jensen Motors from 1966 to 1976 in the United Kingdom. Engine options available at that time for the Interceptor included a Chrysler-sourced 6.3-liter V8 engine and, later on, a more powerful 7.2-liter V8 engine that produced somewhere in the neighborhood of 350 horsepower.

For the new Interceptor R, the engine is expected to be a Dodge Viper-sourced 8.3-liter V10 engine with an output of 510 horsepower and 535 lb/ft of torque.

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Top Gear Season 17: Episode 5

Top Gear Season 17: Episode 5

A week after a forgettable fourth episode, Top Gear bounces back with a pretty entertaining penultimate episode that featured a review on the new Jensen Interceptor, a track day for Jeremy Clarkson with the Lotus Exos Type 125 race car, Bob Geldof as the guest celebrity, and a military house destruction challenge.

Comparing it to the previous show, the content for this week was a lot better, but in a weird twist, the show only had 59 minutes on it - the regular slot usually lasts for 62 to 63 minutes - because, apparently, BBC wanted to show the MotoGP race exactly on time.

That became a running gag during the whole episode as Hammond and May kept speeding up Clarkson in order to fill out the entire episode in the 59 minutes they were given.

In the end, the military destruction challenge proved to be the most entertaining segment of the episode - we’d argue that it’s the best one all year, too - filled with child-like shenanigans from the three hosts that make us love the work they’re doing.

Some people might slam them for wasting their precious time on something so inane, but if you were walking in their shoes, you’d be having a ball of time using military vehicles in trying to put down a cement house.

Details on Top Gear Season 17: Episode 5 after the jump

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2014 Jensen Interceptor R

2014 Jensen Interceptor R

One of the most iconic British sports cars of the 60’s and 70’s is set to be revived by Jensen International Automotive as they hearken back to the nostalgic days when the legendary Jensen Interceptor prowled through the streets of the world.

While official details about the car are still being kept under wraps, we do know a few things worth mentioning, including the powertrain that will come tucked in under the hood. While it was rumored to carry the 6.2-liter V8 engine from the Chevrolet Corvette, the word now is that the Interceptor R - the name it has been given - will carry a Dodge Viper-sourced 8.3-liter V10 engine with an output of 510 horsepower and 535 lb/ft of torque.

The car is scheduled to debut in July at which point we’ll officially get a good look at the second coming of one of Britain’s most popular sports cars. Best be warned though, the Interceptor R is expected to be a hot item and thus, will carry a price tag deserving of its stature. How much is it going to cost? Nothing official has been laid out, but the rumor is that it could hit as high as around $171,650.

The original Jensen Interceptor was a GT-class car that was completely hand-built by Jensen Motors from 1966 to 1976 in the United Kingdom. Engine options available at that time for the Interceptor included a Chrysler-sourced 6.3-liter V8 engine and, later on, a more powerful 7.2-liter V8 engine that produced somewhere in the neighborhood of 350 horsepower.

UPDATE 09/20/2011: We’ve just received fresh details about the future Interceptor R! CPP Global Holdings, the British group that bought Bowler earlier this year, will be in charge of developing and building the Interceptor R. Eventually, CPP will also be in on finalizing and assembling the car in 2014.

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