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Koenigsegg CC

2002 Koenigsegg CC8S

2002 Koenigsegg CC8S High Resolution Exterior
- image 25050
  • Koenigsegg CC8S
  • Year:
    2002
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • 0-60 time:
    3.5 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    240 mph
  • car segment:
  • body style:

Christian von Koenigsegg chased the dream of designing and building his own car, and after just a couple years of work with a small team, the Koenigsegg CC prototype showed up at a track meet. The car was received immediate attention, despite some minor flaws from an excessively quick built. That car was eventually modified to sport the first set of Koenigsegg’s dihedral doors and was even driven on a regular basis. What’s more important, however, is rolling start that prototype gave Koenigsegg in the supercar world – eventually leading to the brand’s first ever production car, the Koenigsegg CC8S.

The CC8S pre-production model made its debut at the Paris Auto Show in 2000, where Koenigsegg took its very first orders for the new supercar. The car went into production in 2002 and was produced in just six examples, with two of them being right-hand drive. It was based on the CC prototype, only this time, production wasn’t rushed, and the car was perfect in comparison. Naturally, it sported the dihedral doors that were integrated into the CC prototype, and also had the detachable, carbon roof that could fit inside the car’s luggage area.

Despite being produced in just six examples, the CC8S won multiple awards, including the Guinness World Record for most powerful production engine as well as awards for its overall design from publications in Germany and Sweden. Jeremy Clarkston, whom you should remember from years of co-hosting BBC’s Top Gear, even named called the CC8S his “favorite supercar of 2004” when comparing it to competitive models from brands like Pagani and Ferrari – now that says a lot about a car produced by a small company that was on a legendary come up.

By this time, it was clear that Koenigsegg had made its mark on the supercar market, and that mark has only gotten bigger over the years. As much as we love to talk about cars like the Koenigsegg One:1 or the Koenigsegg Agera, let’s do something different at look back at Koenigsegg’s first production model.

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2002 Koenigsegg CC8S

2002 Koenigsegg CC8S

Christian von Koenigsegg chased the dream of designing and building his own car, and after just a couple years of work with a small team, the Koenigsegg CC prototype showed up at a track meet. The car was received immediate attention, despite some minor flaws from an excessively quick built. That car was eventually modified to sport the first set of Koenigsegg’s dihedral doors and was even driven on a regular basis. What’s more important, however, is rolling start that prototype gave Koenigsegg in the supercar world – eventually leading to the brand’s first ever production car, the Koenigsegg CC8S.

The CC8S pre-production model made its debut at the Paris Auto Show in 2000, where Koenigsegg took its very first orders for the new supercar. The car went into production in 2002 and was produced in just six examples, with two of them being right-hand drive. It was based on the CC prototype, only this time, production wasn’t rushed, and the car was perfect in comparison. Naturally, it sported the dihedral doors that were integrated into the CC prototype, and also had the detachable, carbon roof that could fit inside the car’s luggage area.

Despite being produced in just six examples, the CC8S won multiple awards, including the Guinness World Record for most powerful production engine as well as awards for its overall design from publications in Germany and Sweden. Jeremy Clarkston, whom you should remember from years of co-hosting BBC’s Top Gear, even named called the CC8S his “favorite supercar of 2004” when comparing it to competitive models from brands like Pagani and Ferrari – now that says a lot about a car produced by a small company that was on a legendary come up.

By this time, it was clear that Koenigsegg had made its mark on the supercar market, and that mark has only gotten bigger over the years. As much as we love to talk about cars like the Koenigsegg One:1 or the Koenigsegg Agera, let’s do something different at look back at Koenigsegg’s first production model.

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2002 Koenigsegg CC Prototype

2002 Koenigsegg CC Prototype

In the Early 1990s, Christian von Koenigsegg had a dream to build his own supercar. It’s a dream that has proven to be unreachable by most, but von Koenigsegg isn’t like most people. He started out by founding his own car company in 1994 and quickly started sketching out a design. Hours turned into days and days turned into weeks. And, after just two years had passed, he and his small team gave man birth the 1996 Koenigsegg CC – a car that would change the supercar segment forever.

The Koenigsegg CC led to the creation of the brand’s first production model, the 2002 Koenigsegg CC8S, as well as the models we know and love today, like the Koenigsegg CC4, Koenigsegg CCX, the Koenigsegg Agera and Koenigsegg One:1. By 2013, after just ten years, Koenigsegg announced that it had built a total of 100 beauties, with the Koenigsegg Agera S Hundra being the one that pushed the company over the benchmark.

So, as you can see, the Koenigsegg CC is a very special car and is really a legend in the supercar world. It set the bar for what a supercar should be, and it’s only fitting that we do it justice by talking about it here today. I introduce you to the Koenigsegg CC, the supercar prototype that led to some of the greatest supercars ever built.

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Koenigsegg Announces Certified Pre-Owned Program

If you want to buy a new Koenigsegg supercar, you’ll need to have prepared anywhere between $1,5 to $2 million, depending on the model and market. Even more, a special-edition Agera S recently sold for $5.3 million, so one can easily see that for ordinary people, these are no bargains.

But now that the company produced over 100 cars, it wants to introduce a "pre owned certification program," for those customers that can not afford a brand-new supercar, but opt for a previously owned one. For example a pre-owned CCR is listed at €400,000 (about $550,000 at the current exchange rates), which is considerable less than a brand-new Koenigsegg.

In order to be eligible as a certified pre-owned car, "it needs to undergo an arduous inspection process as well as be updated and refurbished according to criteria set by Koeningsegg Automotive AB." If approved, that vehicle will receive a two-year factory warranty and free service. Another condition of making the cut; the vehicle had to be originally purchased from an official Koenigsegg representative.

Click past the jump to read more about the latest and greatest Koenigsegg has to offer: the Agera R.

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