Cars Lamborghini Lamborghini Islero

Lamborghini Islero

1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero

1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero High Resolution Exterior
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It’s worth noting that Lamborghini’s successor to the 400 GT was named after a bull that was famous for killing a matador. That says quite a bit about the attitude of the Italian sports car builder, both in the 1960s and today.

Fortunately, the 1968-69 Lamborghini Islero didn’t share its namesake’s homicidal impulses. In fact, the powerful, updated 2+2 coupe was quite a civilized ride. Essentially a design and engineering upgrade to the aging 400 GT, the Islero lived in the shadow of the Miura and Espada. Quality control issues on early models didn’t help; the redesigned V12 2+2 offered many creature comforts and impressive performance. The body woes were eventually fixed, but it nevertheless ended up a low-production model.

That’s a shame, because the Islero was a 150-plus mph car and easily among the top performers of the day. The relatively conventional bodywork meant that it also provided real-world usefulness at the dawn of the mid-engined supercar era. Ferruccio Lamborghini himself drove one as his company car. The Islero received updates in 1969 that gave it the “Islero S” moniker, but by the dawn of the 1970s it had regrettably run its race.

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Latest Lamborghini Islero news and reviews:

Lamborghini restores Espada and Islero for their 50th anniversary celebrations

Lamborghini restores Espada and Islero for their 50th anniversary celebrations

Iconic Lambos will also go on a tour across central Italy

In a time when modern supercars are defined by how outlandish they can look, the Lamborghini Espada and Lamborghini Islero provide reminders that there once was a time when “sexy” didn’t always equate to having the most menacing-looking car in the business. The two Italian icons are still considered two of the finest Lamborghinis ever created, and as the two celebrate their golden jubilee, Lamborghini announced that it has successfully restored the Islero and the Espada that belong to the Lamborghini Museum.

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1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero

1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero

It’s worth noting that Lamborghini’s successor to the 400 GT was named after a bull that was famous for killing a matador. That says quite a bit about the attitude of the Italian sports car builder, both in the 1960s and today.

Fortunately, the 1968-69 Lamborghini Islero didn’t share its namesake’s homicidal impulses. In fact, the powerful, updated 2+2 coupe was quite a civilized ride. Essentially a design and engineering upgrade to the aging 400 GT, the Islero lived in the shadow of the Miura and Espada. Quality control issues on early models didn’t help; the redesigned V12 2+2 offered many creature comforts and impressive performance. The body woes were eventually fixed, but it nevertheless ended up a low-production model.

That’s a shame, because the Islero was a 150-plus mph car and easily among the top performers of the day. The relatively conventional bodywork meant that it also provided real-world usefulness at the dawn of the mid-engined supercar era. Ferruccio Lamborghini himself drove one as his company car. The Islero received updates in 1969 that gave it the “Islero S” moniker, but by the dawn of the 1970s it had regrettably run its race.

Read more
Jay Leno Reviews 1968 Lamborghini Islero: Video

Jay Leno Reviews 1968 Lamborghini Islero: Video

Essentially a re-bodied version of the 350GT and 400GT, the Islero was Lamborghini’s third ever model and the first to be named after a bull. You can imagine that with only 125 units built of the regular Islero and another 100 units of the Islero S, it is among not only the rarest Lamborghinis, but among the rarest of any car ever built. One Islero was snatched by none other than comedian and TV personality Adam Carolla, who was recently invited by Jay Leno to have his car reviewed by the former host of the Tonight Show.

Designed by Giotto Bizzarrini to be better than Ferrari’s V-12 at the time, the twelve-cylinder powering the Islero featured a displacement of 3.9 liters, developing 325 horsepower and 277 pound-feet of torque. While the car was essentially a Gran Tourer, its more than ample amount of power gave it a naught to 62 mph acceleration time of just 6.5 seconds and a top speed of 154 mph, more than enough to embarrass plenty of supercars from the era.

Adam Carolla’s Islero doesn’t sport its original color and has some minor improvements, like the custom-made Lamborghini luggage compartment in place of the cramped rear seats, but other than that, it looks and sounds just like it did when it left the factory back in 1968. As you can imagine, the video above is a great watch, especially as the throaty, carbureted, V-12 sound is simply amazing and obviously unrepeatable in writing.

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