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Lamborghini Jalpa

1981 - 1988 Lamborghini Jalpa

1981 - 1988 Lamborghini Jalpa High Resolution Exterior
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The last Lamborghini to use a V-8 engine

The Lamborghini Jalpa was a sports car produced between 1981 and 1988. A development of the Silhouette, which was discontinued alongside the Urraco in 1979, the Jalpa was Lamborghini’s entry-level sports car in the 1980s. It was slotted below the iconic Countach, being not only significantly more affordable than the supercar, but also easier to drive in heavy traffic and at slow speeds. Unlike the Countach, the Jalpa was powered by a V-8 engine. Its retirement in 1988 meant the end of the entry-level, affordable Lamborghini until the introduction of the Gallardo, in 2003.

The Jalpa was developed in Lamborghini’s most difficult period financial-wise. Affected by the 1973 financial downturn and the oil crisis, Ferruccio sold the company in 1974, only 11 years since its birth. Purchased by Georges-Henri Rossetti and Rene Leimer, Lamborghini went bankrupt in 1978 and was placed in the receivership of brothers Jean-Claude and Patrick Mimran in 1980. The Mimrans, who purchased the company out of receivership by 1984, were responsible for creating the Jalpa and the LM002 truck, two vehicles that were supposed to expand the brand’s offerings beyond V-12-powered supercars.

The Jalpa was discontinued shorty after the Chrysler Corporation bought Lamborghini from the Mimran brothers in 1987. The Jalpa was the last Lamborghini to feature a V-8 engine. Since 1988, all "Raging Bulls" had either V-12 or V-10 powerplants.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lamborghini Jalpa.

 

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1981 - 1988 Lamborghini Jalpa

1981 - 1988 Lamborghini Jalpa

The last Lamborghini to use a V-8 engine

The Lamborghini Jalpa was a sports car produced between 1981 and 1988. A development of the Silhouette, which was discontinued alongside the Urraco in 1979, the Jalpa was Lamborghini’s entry-level sports car in the 1980s. It was slotted below the iconic Countach, being not only significantly more affordable than the supercar, but also easier to drive in heavy traffic and at slow speeds. Unlike the Countach, the Jalpa was powered by a V-8 engine. Its retirement in 1988 meant the end of the entry-level, affordable Lamborghini until the introduction of the Gallardo, in 2003.

The Jalpa was developed in Lamborghini’s most difficult period financial-wise. Affected by the 1973 financial downturn and the oil crisis, Ferruccio sold the company in 1974, only 11 years since its birth. Purchased by Georges-Henri Rossetti and Rene Leimer, Lamborghini went bankrupt in 1978 and was placed in the receivership of brothers Jean-Claude and Patrick Mimran in 1980. The Mimrans, who purchased the company out of receivership by 1984, were responsible for creating the Jalpa and the LM002 truck, two vehicles that were supposed to expand the brand’s offerings beyond V-12-powered supercars.

The Jalpa was discontinued shorty after the Chrysler Corporation bought Lamborghini from the Mimran brothers in 1987. The Jalpa was the last Lamborghini to feature a V-8 engine. Since 1988, all "Raging Bulls" had either V-12 or V-10 powerplants.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lamborghini Jalpa.

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Lamborghini Jalpa Can Be Yours For $115K

Lamborghini Jalpa Can Be Yours For $115K

The 1980s are often seen as a time of permissible excess of every shape and size, which paired quite nicely with the spaceship designs and high-powered performance coming from Lamborghini. Most associate the time period with Lambo’s flagship Countach, but below this bedroom-poster superstar was the lesser-known Jalpa. Framed as the smaller, less expensive Italian option, only 410 were ever produced. Now, you can pick up quite possibly the finest example to survive the era of cocaine and Reaganomics for $115,000.

The rare Lambo is on offer from Hyman Ltd. Classic Cars, a vintage vehicle dealer based out of St. Louis, Missouri. Produced in 1988, this particular Jalpa is one of the very last to be created. The wedge-like exterior, a look that simply oozes 80s, is finished in black, as are the leather seats, while the door panels and carpets are tan. Cabin amenities include air conditioning, an early CD player and an open-gate shifter. A mere 25,378 miles are registered on the odometer.

To keep it running, this Jalpa has had a bit of work done to it, including recent repairs to the ignition wires and exhaust manifold, and a fresh set of tires. Overall, though, the car looks beautifully maintained, which is no surprise given the fact the previous owner was a “professional foreign car mechanic who kept a small collection that he pampered with both enthusiasm and intimate knowledge of what the cars needed,” according to Hyman Ltd. 

Also included are the original warranty booklets and a parts manual, just in case you want to browse all the parts you’ll now probably be able to find.

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Video: GM-Powered Lamborghini Jalpa Runs the Quarter Mile In 10 Seconds

Video: GM-Powered Lamborghini Jalpa Runs the Quarter Mile In 10 Seconds

What we have here, my friends, is a highly-modified Lamborghini Jalpa — a car that in its day, wasn’t all that quick — but now easily lays down 10-second quarter-mile runs like it was a Sunday drive. It’s all thanks to a General Motors LS1 V-8 (350-cubic inches/5.7-liters) with a Magnuson supercharger bolted on. There’s no word on what this Lambo’s American heart pumps out, but it has to be significantly more than the 255 horsepower from the car’s original mill.

Yes, back in 1981 through 1988, Lamborghini produced the Jalpa with a double-overhead-cam, 3.5-liter (210-ci) V-8 that only laid down minimal power. The car was marketed beneath the Countach in price, performance and size. While it wasn’t very stout, its smaller size gave it better outward visibility and better slow-speed handling. Its 0-to-62 time was said to be six seconds flat on its way to a 15.4-second quarter-mile time. Its top speed was rated at 145 mph.

Sadly, 1988 was the Jalpa’s final year in production, as Chrysler bought the Italian automaker and axed the model. Only 412 were made.

Fast forward to the present, Jalpa number 387 makes it’s way down the quarter-mile strip at Calder Park Raceway in Australia. Its supercharged 350 small block is backed by a Toyota automatic transaxle and power is sent to the massive slicks mounted at the rear. Those boys down under sure know how to make a gnarly beast.

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