The rear-wheel-drive Huracan gets a convertible version

Launched in 2014 as a replacement for the Gallardo, Lamborghini’s best-selling nameplate as of 2016, the Huracan has proven quite popular with supercar fans in its first two years on the market. Its fresh, aggressive design, modern interior with race-inspired cues, and upgraded V-12 engine made it one of the most appealing sub-$300,000 supercars on the market and a solid competitor for similar products from Ferrari and McLaren. Much like the Gallardo, the Huracan spawned a convertible Spyder model, a Super Trofeo race car, as well as a rear-wheel-drive, LP 580-2 version, which is available in both coupe and convertible body styles.

The LP 580-2 Spyder is the latest iteration of the supercar to hit the market in late 2016 and not only enlarges the Huracan family, but also completes the core product range. It also provides old-school enthusiasts with a rear-wheel-drive alternative to the bulk of AWD supercars that are being produced today. What’s more, due to the lower output, the LP 580-2 is the most affordable Huracan Spyder you can buy and an entry-level model for Lamborghini’s stable of convertible sports cars.

"This is a Lamborghini for those with a passion for life and the purest driving experience on the open road. It’s also a Huracán for those entering the Lamborghini family, wanting a true Spyder experience without compromising on the performance and dynamic handling of a rear-wheel drive car," said Lamborghini chairman and CEO Stefano Domenicali.

Discover what makes the Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder special in our review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lamborghini Huracan RWD Spyder.

Exterior

2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Exterior
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Just like rear-wheel-drive coupe, the LP 580-2 Spyder is identical to its all-wheel-drive sibling save for the revised front and rear fascia. In order to set it apart from the AWD model, Lambo redesigned the entire bumper section, reshaping the air intakes. Unlike the LP 610-4, which has a two-piece grille with a honeycomb mesh on the sides, the LP 580-2 has a three-piece layout with a bigger center section. Instead of the honeycomb mesh, the side intakes have horizontal canards that help direct cooling air toward the drivetrain and increase downforce on the front axle.

The LP 580-2 Spyder is identical to its all-wheel-drive sibling save for the revised front and rear fascia.

Changes aren’t as significant around back, where the LP 580-2 Spyder receive da slightly revised diffuser and a new three-piece grille under the taillights and trunklid spoiler. Above the waistline, the LP 580-2 is identical to the standard Spyder it is based on. The roll over hoops and the engine lid are identical, as is the soft-top, which uses the same mechanism. The car’s exterior is rounded off by a set of new 19-inch, Kari wheels wrapped in Pirelli PZero tires specifically developed for the car’s rear-wheel-drive configuration. All told, Lambo made a noticeable effort to set the AWD and RWD Huracans apart, and that’s a good thing. What’s more, the LP 580-2 isn’t less appealing that its AWD sibling and it certainly doesn’t look like a budget version of the Huracan. As far as I’m concerned, I find the LP 580-2 to be the prettier one from the rear.

COMPETING DESIGNS

Lamborghini and Ferrari have been fighting for supremacy in the supercar and grand tourer segments for quite a few decades now, and Maranello has just the right weapon against the Huracan. It goes by the name 488 Spider (left) and it arrived in 2016 to replace the 458 Spider. Essentially an evolution of the 458’s design with styling cues taken from the LaFerrari hyper car, the 488 Spider is quite the aggressive drop-top. While its front fascia might not be as menacing as the Huracan’s, the rear section is unique and seems inspired from the world of Formula One due to the wider haunches and the larger two-tier intake behind the doors. The larger flying buttresses behind the seats and the vintage-looking round taillights also help it stand out against any other supercar in this segment.

Another sports car that deserves your attention is the McLaren 650S Spider (right). Introduced to replace the 12C for the 2015 model year, the 650S combines the P1’s aggressive yet clean front fascia with a rear end based around the 12C’s. Some might find the rear section somewhat dated due to the similarities with the 650S’ predecessor, but the design elements are as modern as they get, especially the blade-like taillights, the carved-in decklid, and the trapezoidal, center-mounted exhaust pipes. You don’t get this striking combination on any other supercar nowadays, and it’s probably McLaren didn’t bother to change it. The front fascia and the sides look rather clean compared to the Lambo and Ferrari, but that’s not to say that they do not exude sportiness. Unless you’re into the more angular lines of the Huracan, you can’t go wrong with the 650S Spider.

Exterior Comparison: Ferrari 488 Spider (left) - McLaren 650S Spider (right) - Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder (center)

2016 Ferrari 488 Spider
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2015 McLaren 650S Spider
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2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Exterior
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Ferrari 488 Spider McLaren 650S Spider Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder
Wheelbase (inches) 104.3 105.1 TBA
Length (inches) 179.8 177.6 TBA
Width (inches) 76.9 82.4 TBA
Height (inches) 47.7 47.36 TBA

Interior

Identical to the all-wheel-drive Huracan Spyder on the inside, the LP 580-2 benefits from the same features Lambo introduced back in 2014. Redesigned from the ground up, the Huracans interior gained an aggressive styling with sharp contours on the dashboard and a one-piece center stack and tunnel unit hosting almost all buttons and knobs. The new, 12.3-inch TFT instrument cluster provides all vital information about the car’s performance and also acts as a display for the Lamborghini Infotainment System II.

2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Interior
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Identical to the all-wheel-drive Huracan Spyder on the inside, the LP 580-2 benefits from the same features Lambo introduced back in 2014.

The supercar also comes with updated sports seats, a new steering wheel, and all the carbon-fiber, fine leather, and Alcantara you would expect from a high-profile vehicle with a "Raging Bull" on the hood. Like in all modern Lamborghinis, the upholstery is available in a wide range of colors and it’s usually highlighted by contrast stitching, Lamborghini logos, and Italian flags. Just like the standard model, the rear-wheel-drive Huracan can be customized via Ad Personam, Lamborghini’s very own personalization program.

Moving over to the soft-top, which opens up to provide infinite headroom and better access to the amazing soundtrack of the V-10 engine behind the seats, it can be operated at speeds of up to 50 km/h and takes 17 seconds to fold or unfold. The roof-casing is stoved behind the seats and was design to maintain the car’s perfect center of gravity. An integrated duct reduces turbulence in the headroom during open top driving, while an electronically operated rear window works as a windshield when up and highlights the engine’s sound when down. Two removable lateral windguards dampen lateral aerodynamic noise in the cabin, even at high speeds.

COMPETING FEATURES AND TECH

As you’d expect from a Ferrari, the 488 Spider’s (left) interior has what it takes to give the Lambo a run for its money. Much like its predecessor, the 488 comes with a driver-focused cockpit with all the important features oriented toward the main seat. The upper section of the center stack is angled toward the driver, while the center console is slightly oriented toward the driver’s seat. The flat-bottom, multi-function steering wheel and the instrument cluster are both derived from motorsport, while the seats provide the utmost stability when driving aggressively on the race track. Nearly every surface is covered in fine Italian leather, while the remaining spots are either Alcantara, aluminum, or carbon-fiber. The retractable roof is carried over from the 458 Spider and remains a two-part, electronically folding top. The rear glass window can be adjusted to one of three positions to optimize wind flow when the top is down.

Unlike the Lamborghini and Ferrari, the 650S (right) is more about clean looks rather than flamboyant upholstery and designs. The dashboard looks rather simple, while the narrow, sloping center stack and console arrangement reminds of race-spec interior. Sure, the craftsmanship is outstanding and supercar drivers will feel like home in the 650S, but the McLaren was crafted for enthusiasts looking for a motorsport-style cabin rather than a fancy place to spend time in. Another major difference is that Most surfaces are wrapped in Alcantara. Again, this material was chosen to better simulate the cockpit of a race car. The McLaren also comes with an infotainment screen in the center stack, while the Huracan and 488 use only the instrument cluster to communicate with the driver. The steering wheel and the gauges behind it don’t look as aggressive as the Ferrari’s, but the feeling you are driving a track-ready car is still present. Like its competitors, the 650S is very customizable, with McLaren allowing buyers to change everything from the upholstery and trim to the seats and the color of the stitching.

Interior Comparison: Ferrari 488 Spider (left) - McLaren 650S Spider (right) - Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder (center)

2016 Ferrari 488 Spider
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2015 McLaren 650S Spider Interior
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2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Interior
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Drivetrain

The Huracan LP 580-2 gets its juice from the same high-revving, 5.2-liter V-10 found in the regular Huracan, but just like the rear-wheel-drive coupe, the RWD drop-top comes with a lower output. Specifically, the rear wheels get 571 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque, which is a 31-horsepower and 15-pound-foot decrease compared to the all-wheel-drive Huracan. That’s still a lot of oomph, especially given the car’s curb weight of only 1,509 kg (about 3,327 pounds). Sprinting from 0 to 60 mph takes 3.6 seconds, which makes it two tenths slower than both the all-wheel-drive Spyder and the rear-wheel-drive coupe. Top speed is rated at 198, a minor three-mph decrease from the LP 610-4 Spyder. The rear-wheel-drive coupe tops out at 199 mph, while makes the 580-2 Spyder the slowest Huracan yet, but this matters on the scoreboard only, as you won’t speed up toward 200 mph too often.

2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Exterior
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Just like the rear-wheel-drive coupe, the RWD drop-top comes with a lower output.

The transmission is a Lamborghini Doppia Frizione (LDF) seven-speed, dual-clutch unit that was specifically revised for the rear-wheel-drive layout. It includes launch control for optimum acceleration from a standing start, and Lambo also offers Dynamic Steering for enhanced agility and control. The steering setup and traction controls have also been recalibrated, while weight distribution is biased 40-percent at the front and 60-percent at the rear, which inertia on the front axle compared to the all-wheel-drive version of the Huracan.

The Huracan’s hybrid chassis made from aluminum and carbon-fiber is complemented by springs and anti-roll bars on double wishbone suspension, also optimized for two-wheel drive. It also features the Lamborghini Piattaforma Inerziale (LPI), a sensor that provides real time information to the optional Magneto Rheological Suspension (MRS) and steering and stability control systems. Lambo also equipped the 580-2 with cylinder deactivation, which improves engine efficiency and reduces CO2 emission. Five of the 10 cylinder are temporarily deactivation when full engine capacity is not required.

COMPETING PERFORMANCE

There are two important factors that set the Huracan Spyder 580-2 and the Ferrari 488 Spider apart. First, the Maranello-built roadster traded the naturally aspirated engine of the 458 model for a twin-turbo, 3.9-liter V-8. Second, Ferrari doesn’t offer an entry-level of the 488, which makes this car better suited to go against the more powerful, all-wheel-drive Huracan. Rated at 660 horsepower and 560 pound-feet, the 488 Spider benefits from an extra 89 horses and 162 pound-feet, which are more than noticeable when performance figures are compared. For instance, the Ferrari hits 60 mph in a scant three seconds, making it more than a half-second quicker than the Lambo. Its top speed is also superior at 203 mph. Like the Huracan, the 488 Spider also comes with a hybrid spaceframe chassis made of 11 aluminum alloys and magnesium, among other lightweight materials, and it’s as rigid as the coupe, meaning it’s not significantly heavier despite the convertible layout.

Just like the 488 Spider, the McLaren 650S Spider also uses forced induction, a V-8 engine, a generates way more power than the Lambo. The twin-turbo, 3.8-liter V-8, an award winning engine that found its way in all McLaren products, sends 640 horsepower and 500 pound-feet of torque to the rear wheels. These figures give the McLaren a 69-horsepower and 102-pound-foot advantage over the Lamborghini. Only 80 pounds heavier than the coupe, the 650S Spider is the quickest of the bunch, needing only 2.9 seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start. It can also brag about being the fastest with a top speed of 204 mph. The supercar rides on a carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer chassis derived from the 12C and uses motorsport-based suspension and brakes, which makes it suitable for weekends at the race track without upgrades.

Ferrari 488 Spider McLaren 650S Spider Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder
Engine 4.0-liter V-8 3.8-liter 3-8 5.2-liter V-10
Horsepower 660 HP @ 8,000 RPM 640 HP @ 7,250 RPM 571 HP
Torque 560 LB-FT @ 3,000 rpm 500 LB-FT @ 6,000 RPM 398 LB-FT
0 to 60 mph 3 seconds 2.9 seconds 3.6 seconds
Top Speed 203 mph 204 mph 199 mph
Weight 3,362 Lbs 3,020 Lbs TBA

Safety

Being a supercar, you can’t expect the Huracan to come with the many safety features you get with a luxury sedan. However, Lambo provides just enough features for the car to comply to modern crash tests, as well as a few driver assisting technologies. The Huracan gets just two airbags as standard, one for the driver and one for the passenger, while knee airbags are available in certain markets only. It also has specifically designed collapsible areas front and rear, as well as a side protection system. Active safety features include Electronic Stability Control with integrated ABS and TCS.

Prices

Pricing is not yet available, but Lambo did say that the LP 580-2 Spyder will be priced between the two and four-wheel drive coupe models, which retail from around $240,000 and $265,000, respectively. For reference, the coupe version of the Huracan LP 580-2 costs $203,000 before options. The rear-wheel-drive Huracan Spyder will be available in markets worldwide starting January 2017.

COMPETING PRICES

Although there’s no official sticker for the Huracan yet, the fact that it will slot between the coupe and convertible AWD models means it will be more affordable than the Ferrari 488 Spider. The Maranello-built roadster retails from around $275,000. The Lambo will be easier on the wallet compared to the McLaren 650S Spider too, which is the most expensive supercar of the bunch with a starting price of $280,225.

Other Competitors

Aston Martin Vanquish S Volante

2018 Aston Martin Vanquish S High Resolution Exterior
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Granted, the Vanquish S Volante isn’t a true competitor for the Huracan, mostly because it’s a bit larger, around 500 pounds heavier, and has its engine in the front. However, with both the Porsche 911 Turbo and Audi R8 being AWD exclusive, the Vanquish S Volante is one of the very few options left besides the Ferrari 488 Spider and McLaren 650S Spider that is rear-wheel-driven. The Vanquish just received a facelift for the 2017 model year, gaining an "S" badge and a few nips and tucks inside and out. Under the hood, the big 5.9-liter V-12 was upgraded to 592 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque, which makes the Vanquish S a bit more powerful than the Lambo. But due to the extra weight, the Aston Martin isn’t quicker from 0 to 60 mph, needing 3.6 seconds, as much as the Huracan. On the other hand, it can hit a top speed of 200 mph, versus the Lambo’s 198 limit. Pricing starts from $294,950, a bit steep given the vehicle isn’t exactly a supercar.

Learn more about the Aston Martin Vanquish S here.

Conclusion

2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Exterior
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In an era when most high-profile supercars have switched from good old-fashioned rear-wheel drive to all-wheel drive, it’s nice that Lamborghini cares enough to keep old-school enthusiasts happy. Sure, supercars with AWD are more stable on the road and track and somewhat easier to drive, but it’s the RWD layout that provides the most thrills. The only downside of the Huracan 580-2 is that it’s significantly slower than its Ferrari- and McLaren-badged competitors, but that’s something I would complain about given that all the other supercars in this niche are AWD exclusive.

  • Leave it
    • * Not as powerful and quick as its competitors
    • * Not exactly affordable either

Press Release

Automobili Lamborghini presents the Lamborghini Huracán rear-wheel drive Spyder, combining the lifestyle appeal of the convertible with the pure on-road experience of the Huracán’s rear-wheel drive technologies.

“The rear-wheel drive Spyder enlarges the Huracán family’s core product range,” says Automobili Lamborghini Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Stefano Domenicali. “It offers the lifestyle appeal of open-air motoring with the pure thrill of rear-wheel drive engineering. This is a Lamborghini for those with a passion for life and the purest driving experience on the open road. It’s also a Huracán for those entering the Lamborghini family, wanting a true Spyder experience without compromising on the performance and dynamic handling of a rear-wheel drive car.”

2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Exterior
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The rear-wheel drive Huracán Spyder features a newly designed front and rear with a dynamic but more aggressive look distinguishing it from the four-wheel drive version. Its naturally aspirated V10 5.2 l engine sends 426 kW / 580 hp to the rear axle, with its dry weight of just 1,509 kg providing a weight-to-power ratio of 2.6 kg/hp. Acceleration from 0-100 km/h is achieved in 3.6 seconds with a top speed of 319 km/h.

The rear-wheel drive Spyder will be available in markets worldwide from January 2017, priced between the two and four-wheel drive coupe models and completing the core Huracán product range.

2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Exterior
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Soft-top design for a true Spyder
The front and rear of the car have been redesigned, with its dynamic good looks accented by the large front air intakes that direct cooling air and headwind to increase down pressure on the front axle. Pirelli PZero tires, exclusively developed for the rear-wheel drive Huracán, sit on 19” Kari rims. Specially contoured steel brakes with aluminum brake disc pots assist in weight reduction and improved cooling. Inside, the cockpit features the latest Lamborghini Infotainment System II with a 12.3” hi-res TFT instrument panel.
The latest addition to the Huracán family adopts the soft-top solution of a true Spyder, distinguishing the convertible from its coupe sibling through a unique profile, with roof both up and down. Opening and closing in just 17 seconds at speeds of up to 50 km/h, the lightweight soft top is efficiently stowed to maintain the Spyder’s perfect center of gravity and highlight the dynamic design of the open car.

With the roof down, two distinctive fins rise out of the folding roof-casing to perfectly define the unique lines of the open car. Accenting the Huracán Spyder’s low, powerful appearance, the rear fins start at the seatbacks and continue the roof line to the rear, creating the Spyder’s flowing profile. The two fins contribute to optimizing airflow through the engine compartment, which is covered by a slatted engine bonnet specific to the Spyder.

2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Exterior
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An integrated duct reduces turbulence in the headroom during open top driving. With soft top both up and down the driver can also electronically open the rear window, which functions as a windshield when up and highlights the V10 engine’s unique sound when down. Two removable lateral windguards dampen lateral aerodynamic noise in the cabin, permitting conversations even at high speeds.

Engineered for rear-wheel drive performance
As it does in the rear-wheel drive Huracán coupe, the Spyder’s V10 5.2 l naturally aspirated, mid-mounted engine provides a maximum 426 kW (580 hp) power output at 8,000 rpm and 540 Nm of torque at 6,500 rpm, with 75% of torque already available at 1,000 rpm.

Like the coupe, the rear-wheel drive Spyder promises the thrill of two-wheel drive dynamics, roof up or down. Weighing 1,509 kg dry, the rear-wheel drive Huracán Spyder achieves a weight to power ratio of just 2.6 kg/hp. The Huracán’s exceptionally stiff hybrid aluminum and carbon fiber chassis is complemented by springs and anti-roll bars on double wishbone suspension, optimized for two-wheel drive. The power management system of the rear-wheel drive includes a specific steering set-up and recalibrated stability and traction controls, connecting the driver as directly as possible with the road. Weight distribution is biased 40% at the front / 60% at the rear, reducing inertia on the front axle compared to the Huracán 4WD version.

2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Exterior
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The Lamborghini Doppia Frizione (LDF) seven-speed dual clutch architecture ensures the fastest gear changes and includes ‘launch control’ for maximum acceleration from a standing start. The electronic power steering and optional Lamborghini Dynamic Steering (LDS) are tuned specifically for the rear-wheel drive Spyder, ensuring maximum agility and control in every driving condition, depending on driving mode and speed.
Rear kinematics heighten the car’s ‘centered’ feeling and the new Spyder features the Lamborghini Piattaforma Inerziale (LPI), the Huracán’s sensor system placed in the center of gravity of the car, tracing all 3D movements. It provides real time information to the optional Magneto Rheological Suspension (MRS), steering and stability control systems: the ESC has been regulated to adapt to all adherence conditions yet emphasize the rear-wheel drive behavior in each driving mode.

2017 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 Spyder High Resolution Interior
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The ANIMA (Adaptive Network Intelligent Management: ‘soul’ in Italian) button on the steering wheel allows the driver to adopt different driving modes, calibrated to suit the spirit of the rear-wheel drive model. STRADA for daily use, SPORT for sporty driving fun, and CORSA for maximum track-oriented performance are tuned to provide over-steering characteristics, emphasizing authentic rear-wheel drive behavior.

As in all Huracán models, cylinder deactivation improves engine efficiency, reduces fuel consumption and reduces CO2. When full engine capacity is not required, five of the ten cylinders are temporarily deactivated by switching off one cylinder bank. When the driver accelerates, the system switches back instantaneously to ten-cylinder mode, with the changeover being virtually impossible to detect by the driver.

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