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How Far Can $10 Take You? How About a One-Off Lamborghini Huracan Signed by Pope Francis Himself

How Far Can $10 Take You? How About a One-Off Lamborghini Huracan Signed by Pope Francis Himself

Now’s your chance to win a true, one-off heavenly Lamborghini Huracan

What can your $10 get you? For some people, $10 equates to a few lottery tickets. For others, it’s a pack of cigarettes. That’s great, sure, but what if your $10 can get you a one-off Lamborghini Huracan that bares the signature of none other than His Holiness, Pope Francis? This isn’t a joke, folks. The one-off, white and gold Huracan that Lamborghini gave to Pope Francis back in November 2017 is now up-for-grabs at Omaze. The lottery-slash-charity initiative requires at least a $10 donation to enter the sweepstakes. According to Omaze, proceeds from the lottery will go to a “number of causes working to transform lives around the world.” The website is accepting donations ranging from $10 to $5,000. The amount donated correlates to the number of entries you get. Entries will be accepted until January 30, 2019.

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1973 - 1979 Lamborghini Urraco

1973 - 1979 Lamborghini Urraco

The underrated baby mid-engined Lamborghini of the ’70s

The Urraco heralded Lamborghini’s entry in the budget supercar niche. It was available in a number of guises, the P200, P250, and P300. Less than 800 units of this sleek V-8 mid-engined Italian beauty were sold before production ceased back in 1979. In spite of its rarity, the Urraco still fails to command the kind of prices you’ll see early Dinos being sold for.

Presented at the 1970 Turin Auto Show, the Urraco hit the market two years later as an affordable 2+2 supercar that wasn’t really a supercar and stood in either the Miura’s or the Countach’s shadow throughout its lifespan. Its design, penned by Marcello Gandini during his stint at Bertone, leaves something to be desired as far as dramatism goes with the more dedicated 2-seater Merak from Maserati being clearly the best-looking budget supercar at the time.

For all its shortcomings, many of which were mocked during a Top Gear episode which centered around the Merak, the Dino 308 GT4 and the Urraco, the Urraco was considered a brilliant car by Lamborghini engineers as it incorporated a number of industry firsts and other novel ideas for the early ’70s, many of which have been forgotten as time wore on and the scissor doors of the Countach turned the heads of just about any automotive aficionado.

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1995 - 2001 Lamborghini Diablo SV

1995 - 2001 Lamborghini Diablo SV

The first Lambo to wear an SV badge since the iconic Miura

The Lamborghini Diablo arrived at a difficult time for the Italian firm. Barely out of bankruptcy and purchased by the Mimran brothers in 1985, Lamborghini began working on a successor for the aging Countach. Development took no fewer than four years, with the final car unveiled in 1990. Just like its predecessor, the Diablo was made available in various versions, including an SV model, reviving the Super Veloce name for the first time since the Miura SV was discontinued in 1973.

Lambo introduced the SV model at the 1995 Geneva Motor Show, a full five years after the Diablo went into production. It was essentially a more powerful version of the regular Diablo. It had larger brakes but lacked the all-wheel-drive system in the VT. The Diablo SV was updated alongside the other trims when Lambo facelifted the supercar in 1998, but it became the lineup’s base model and was discontinued after just one year on the market, replaced by the GT. Production of the Diablo continued two years after the SV was retired until 2001.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lamborghini Diablo SV.

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Prepare to Spend Big if You Want to Own Pope Francis' One-Off Lamborghini Huracan

Prepare to Spend Big if You Want to Own Pope Francis’ One-Off Lamborghini Huracan

Early estimates have the one-off Huracan selling for almost $500,000

Back in November 2017, Lamborghini decided to gift Pope Francis with his own one-off Lamborghini Huracan. The Pontiff graciously declined the gift, opting instead to donate it in the name of charity. Fast forward months later and the aforementioned one-off Huracan is now set to be auctioned off without a reserve price by RM Sotheby’s in Monaco on May 12.

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Craziest Thing This Week: The Pope Blesses a Lamborghini Huracan

Craziest Thing This Week: The Pope Blesses a Lamborghini Huracan

One-off Lambo will go to auction to benefit three of the pope’s preferred charities

Pope Francis is no stranger to receiving gifts. That comes with the territory of being the leader of the Catholic church and arguably one of the most powerful men in the world. But the famously frugal pontiff isn’t one who enjoys the lavish side of life so when he recently took possession of a one-off Lamborghini Huracan, a gift from the Italian automaker itself, the pope did what the pope usually does: he donated it away.

It’s a bitter blow for papal paparazzi who were hoping to see the pope roar around the cobbled streets of Rome, aviator sunglasses in tow. But the pope’s preference for the simple things in life isn’t anything new. This is a man who traditionally opts to get driven around in Fiats and Fords when he’s on the road so getting inside a Lamborghini is a non-starter to begin with. So instead of taking ownership of the one-off Huracan, the pope decided to receive it from Lamborghini out of courtesy, sign the hood, and give it to RM Sotheby’s, which will then auction the supercar with the proceeds going to three of the holy father’s favorite charities. Considering how much value is placed on items that carry the pope’s signature, expect this one-off Lamborghini Huracan to fetch way more than it’s usual price of $200,000.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2016 Mecum Monterey Auction – Preview

2016 Mecum Monterey Auction – Preview

A little bit of everything, for the right price

Mecum Auctions has been involved with collector cars for almost three decades now, growing from a small family business to selling roughly 20,000 lots per year. In addition to top-dollar automobiles, Mecum also offers vintage motorcycles, collectible road art, and believe it or not, tractors. But you and I don’t really care about all that other stuff – we’re in it for the cars, from cutting-edge performance machines to ironclad muscle cars, antique classics to no-frills racers. Thankfully, Mecum has the entire spread on tap. The auction house averages more than one event per month, but one of the biggest is in California for Monterey Car Week. Roughly 600 vehicles are slated to hit the block for 2016, and we’ve got some of the most interesting of them profiled right here.

Highlighting the lineup for Monterey is the Modern Speed Collection, a host of ultra-high-end speed-mobiles from the present day. Mecum calls it “the apex of 21st Century automotive performance,” and picking through the offerings, I’m inclined to agree. Think rare, gorgeous, and absurdly quick.

TopSpeed will be on the scene this year, bringing you all the latest. Read on for a taste of what’s in store.

Update 08-20-2016 5:00 P.M. PST We’re on the scene at Mecum and have updated this preview with a welcome video. Check it out in the preview below.
Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Mecum Monterey Auction.

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1986 - 1993 Lamborghini LM002

1986 - 1993 Lamborghini LM002

Ready your preconceptions for shattering, because they aren’t long for this world: the behemoth SUV pictured here is from Italian exotic sports car manufacturer Lamborghini. Dubbed the “Rambo Lambo”, this particular example represents one of only 328 vehicles produced between the years of 1986 and 1993. It’s the byproduct of Lamborghini’s “Cheetah” program, which began in 1977 as the development platform for a new military off-roader. The original design, featuring a rear-mounted Chrysler V-8, went to Mobility Technology International (MTI). MTI ended up contracting for the US military, and in some respects, the Cheetah could be considered the precursor to the Humvee.

After the Cheetah, Lamborghini created the LM001, which was similar, but came with a V-8 from AMC. When it was determined that a rear-mounted engine was responsible for unfavorable off-road handling characteristics, Lambo decided to build an entirely new chassis with the V-12 from the Countach sitting up front. Thus, the LM002 was born, making its official debut at the 1986 Brussels Auto Show.

In 1988, Lamborghini attempted to enter an LM002 in the Paris-Dakar Rally, with preparations including a stripped interior, a roll cage, suspension enhanced with heavy-duty components, an engine with output upped to 600 horsepower, and GPS. Unfortunately, funding ran out before the rally took place, but the beefy rally variant did eventually manage to compete in off-road races held in both Egypt and Greece.

Another interesting story finds one particularly unfortunate LM002, owned by Uday Hussein, son of the dictator, blown to smoldering chunks by US service members in 2004 during the invasion of Iraq to help demonstrate the effects of a car bomb.

With such a tumultuous genesis, it’ll be interesting to see what Lamborghini decides to do when it comes to an off-roader/SUV offering. With concepts like the Urus making headlines in the past few years, it certainly looks like Lambo is searching for the right way to reenter the market. Only time will tell if this latest effort is more successful than the LM002.

Updated 9/1/2015: Our man Jonathan Lopez took some pics at Monterey Car Week. Enjoy!

Click past the jump to read more about the Lamborghini LM002.

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 Lamborghini Concept S Will Be Auctioned In November

Lamborghini Concept S Will Be Auctioned In November

Although it launched the Gallardo in 2003, it took Lamborghini three years to develop a convertible version of its entry-level supercar. However, the 2006 Lamborghini Gallardo Spyder wasn’t the first drop-top iteration of the model. Before it, it came the 2006 Lamborghini Concept S, a show car that featured a divided cabin layout with separate windscreens. It was a modern interpretation of the single-seat roadsters of the 1950s and Lamborghini was rumored to build 100 units for select customers.

The Italians eventually decided to keep it as a styling exercise and came up with the less radical Gallardo Spyder. After 10 years, the Concept S is up for grabs via RM Auctions. The concept car will cross the auction block on November 18th, 2015, in New York. As it is with such vehicles, the Concept S is in tip-top condition and fully operable. What’s more, it’s also street-legal and it has been driven for only 112 miles.

There’s no estimate as to how much it’s expected to fetch, but considering we’re talking about a one-off factory vehicle in mint condition, it should change owners for at least two million bucks. The auction is still four months away, but we’ll be back with the result as soon as the hammer goes down. Stay tuned!

Continue reading for the full story.

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Six Lamborghini Supercars Will Be Auctioned In June

Six Lamborghini Supercars Will Be Auctioned In June

While seeing Lamborghinis cross the block at auctions across America is far from rare, it’s not too often that the same event gets to sell six of them. This rare display will be hosted by Mecum’s sale in Seattle on June 5th to 6th, where Lamborghini enthusiasts will get to buy — or at least admire — six Italian bulls built from 1989 to 2010.

Yes, there won’t be any Miuras or Espadas to ogle at, but the Lambo lot includes a late-edition Countach and a bundle of Diablos and Murcielagos, some of which are very rare.

The oldest supercar on sale is a 1989 Countach 25th Anniversary. Part of the limited, 658-unit edition that marked the end of the nameplate, this car is also one of only 187 examples produced with fuel injection for the U.S. and Canadian markets. The Bianco White-painted Countach has 28,420 miles on its odo.

Next in line is a black 1992 Diablo. Though it’s only a standard model, it does feature a rear wing, SV wheels, and Pirelli P Zero tires. With only 11,643 miles on the clock, it should attract a few bidders. The second Diablo to go under the hammer is a 1999 model year Roadster. Significantly more powerful than the early coupe, it has 30,188 miles on the odometer and just received a $12,500 major service. It features a front lift system, navigation, polished wheels, and an aftermarket stereo head unit with six-disc CD player and remotes.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1971 Lamborghini Miura SVJ By Bertone

1971 Lamborghini Miura SVJ By Bertone

Old Ferrari’s have been selling for ridiculous sums of cash and grabbing headline space recently, but now an ultra-rare 1971 Lamborghini Miura SVJ will be crossing the auction block at the 2015 RM Auction event in Scottsdale, Arizona, and, according to RM, it could see a hammer price as high as $2.6 million.

First introduced in 1966, the Lamborghini Miura is widely regarded to both the first mid-engine road-going supercar and one of the prettiest cars ever built. It was penned by Italian designer Marcello Gandini of Gruppo Bertone, and, interestingly, was developed by a small engineering against the wishes of Ferruccio Lamborghini, who preferred grand touring cars like the 350 GT.

The story of the Miura SVJ variant starts with the Lamborghini Jota — a one-off car based on the Miura developed by Lamborghini test driver Bob Wallace to go racing. Unfortunately, the Jota never raced, and it later crashed and burned to the ground at the hands of a private owner.

But by that time, word of the Jota’s potential had reached other Miura customers, which finally brings us to the car we have here. This Miura SVJ is one of five (or possibly seven, depending on who you ask) examples ever built. The SVJ used many of the high performance parts originally developed for Jota, including upgrades to the engine, body, exhaust, suspension and brakes.

This particular example, chassis number 4892, was originally built as a Miura SV and later converted to SVJ specification. Only two SVJs were built at the factory from the ground up. It underwent a two-year restoration in 2007 costing $225,000. The current owner was also able to get in touch with Bob Wallace before he passed away in 2013 to confirm that it was indeed a factory converted SVJ.

Click past the jump to read more about the Lamborghini Miura SVJ By Bertone.

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Video: A Look Behind the Scenes of RM Auctions

Video: A Look Behind the Scenes of RM Auctions

RM Auctions is one of the biggest auto auction houses in the world. It’s been home to some of the biggest auction buys in recent memory, including a 1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Scaglietti Spider that sold for $6.4 million back in 2012. For 2014, RM Auctions is set to open shop in London where a number of classic exotics will be up for bid to the highest bidder.

EVO managed to get a guided tour of RM Auctions’ storage facility where Harry Metcalfe joined the team to talk shop about some of the cars that are expected to get a lot of attention at the sale.

As expected, the facility contains some of the rarest and most beautiful metal, carbon fiber and aluminum in the world. EVO and Metcalfe zeroed in on a few of them, including a rare 1986 Ferrari Testarossa and a 1990 Lamborghini Countach. These two cars are widely considered as the "poster exotics" of the 1980s, and seeing them in the same auction is a real blast back to the decade of teased hair and leather pants for myself.

The guided tour also included short discussions about the 1993 Jaguar XJ220, the 1959 Facel Vega HK500 Coupe, and the 1973 Alpine-Renault A110 1300 V85.

There are many more cars that EVO and Metcalfe discuss in this 32-minute episode. I won’t run the risk of spoiling all the models, as having an authority like Metcalfe give you a little history lesson about them trumps my ramblings about them here.

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Goodwood Festival of Speed's Annual Bonhams Sale Raises Nearly $39 Million

Goodwood Festival of Speed’s Annual Bonhams Sale Raises Nearly $39 Million

Most of us watched the Goodwood Festival of Speed to see hundreds of awesome road and race cars storm up the Hill. Others, including many past and present racing drivers, travel to Goodwood to hoon the vehicles we drool upon. But there’s a third category of motoring enthusiasts that take trips to England to pay million for the classic cars sold each year by Bonhams, one of the world’s oldest and largest auction house.

This year’s event brought together nearly 100 vehicles and more than 400 automotive-related collectors items, raising a staggering £22.6 million (nearly $39 million as of 06/27/2014). One car alone sold for nearly half that amount, with two more fetching more than $1 million each, rounding up yet another successful event.

Not surprising, the most expensive vehicle sold at Goodwood was a Ferrari. Maranello classics are already a common occurrence at such events, and very few change hands for less than $5 million. On the other hand, how often do you see a 102-year-old vehicle sell for more than $1 million? Head over below to find out more about the most expensive classic cars auctioned at Goodwood.

Click past the jump to read more about Bonhams’ sale at Goodwood

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Rare, 1982 Lamborghini Countach will Cross the Auction Block

Rare, 1982 Lamborghini Countach will Cross the Auction Block

It’s always been a fantasy to lock a brand new supercar away in storage till the day its inevitable popularity started to resurge and its price tag would fetch far more profit than the car was originally worth. That’s exactly what we see here with this nearly flawless example of a 1982 Lamborghini Countach LP5000S.

With only 8,543 miles on the odometer, this Lamborghini has been kept in dry storage while still getting regular maintenance and exercise from its owner and certified Lamborghini dealerships. Just recently the car underwent an $8,000 refurbishing job, getting it ready for auction in June 2014 at the Historics at Brooklands near London.

Not only is the car’s condition something of rarity, the Countach itself is only one of 2,042 ever built. What’s more, this particular model is one of only 321 built with the massive 4.8-liter, V-12 engine in 1982. It’s mated to a five-speed manual transmission that helps launch the car to 62 mph in 5.4 seconds on its way to a 160-mph top speed.

If you happen to be in the market for a nearly brand-new Countach, the bidding happens on Saturday, June 7th with viewing commencing the day before. It’s estimated the car will sell for between $185,000 and $243,000, so be sure to bring your accountant to pay for it.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1982 Lamborghini Countach.

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Solid Gold Lamborghini Can be Yours For Over $7 million

Solid Gold Lamborghini Can be Yours For Over $7 million

When it comes to the supercars in the Dubai, we have heard just about every crazy story that we can think of. The latest one includes this new record-breaking Lamborghini Aventador, made out of gold and gems.

This shiny Aventador features 55 pounds of gold, and is currently on auction at a price of $7.5 million, with $650,000 of tht money earmarked for charity. With that massive price, this is set to be the most expensive Lamborghini in the world.

We are talking of course about a 1:18 scale model, carved from a 1,100-pound block of solid gold. The model is currently on display in a Dubai showroom, and for security reasons, it is currently just a prototype made from a less-expensive material. The fortunate winner of the bid will have the opportunity to customize the scale model according to his personal desire.

Despite not being a road-ready model, this Aventador is already listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the most expensive model car.

Click past the jump to read more about the real Lamborghini Aventador.

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The most expensive Lamborghini in the world is a $4.8 million Aventador scale model (UPDATED)

The most expensive Lamborghini in the world is a $4.8 million Aventador scale model (UPDATED)

€3.5 million, or $4.83 million, will buy you a lot of things, including 12 Lamborghini Aventador supercars. Why anyone would need that many Aventadors is beyond us, but what is even more mind-boggling is why someone would spend that much money on a 1:8 scale model of the new Lamborghini supercar. Yes, one is for sale and it’s priced at $4.83 million.

This unbelievable scale model was presented by former Mercedes-Benz engineer and German model maker, Robert Gulpen, at the Frankfurt Motor Show. Made from some of the most precious materials used for construction, the scale model Aventador comes wrapped in 1/1000mm thin threads of solid gold with carbon fiber forming the entire body of the car, and solid gold and platinum rims and interior to finish it off. On top of that, the material used on the windows is bulletproof glass and the Lamborghini logo adorned in the back is made from gold, platinum, and other precious gems.

All told, the whole project required €2 million ($2.8 million), which is insane just to read. The other half of that cost most likely comes as a result of 500 hours of build time.

The car is set to be auctioned off soon, possibly at Sotherby’s or Chrystie’s in New York or Dubai. Expect the model to fetch a starting bid of €3.5 million - $4.83 million - with part of the final purchase price going to charity.

Whether somebody’s insane enough to actually pay 12 times the price of an actual Lamborghini Aventador is besides the point. Paying $5 million for just about anything, let alone a scale model, is crazy enough.

UPDATE 12/02/2011: Robert Guelpen has decided to further increase the value of his Aventador by gilding it with gold. The car will be sold in December 2011 and will more than likely enter the Guinness Book of Records. The car features approximately 700 diamonds studded on each of the two seats inside, the chassis is made in solid gold, the wheel rims are platinum, and other elements are made of carbon fiber.

UPDATE 12/12/12: What was initially priced at €3.5 million ($4.8 million) at an auction in December in New York, Robert Guelpen’s Aventador scale model has been re-evaluated by Sotheby’s and now carries an estimated price of €10.5 million ($13.6 million!). That’s 65 times more expensive than an ACTUAL Aventador. Wow.

Hit the jump for a video showing off the Aventador scale model.

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1967 Lamborghini Marzal

1967 Lamborghini Marzal

The Lamborghini Marzal is a concept car unveiled by Lamborghini at the 1967 Geneva Motor Show. It was designed by Marcello Gandini of Bertone, and like any other Lamborghini models, it was named after a strain of fighting bull. The Marzal was never put into production, but some of its design cues were used in the future Espada. As this is a one-of model it should not surprise you the fact that it was auctioned for an impressive €1.512.000, or about $2,100,000 at the current exchange rates.

The Marzal is powered by a transversely mounted 175 HP in-line six-cylinder which was essentially half of the Miura engine, the V-12 was cut in half lengthwise, and was mated to a standard five-speed transmission. The concept was built on a modified Miura chassis, extended by 120 mm in order to accommodate the extra two passengers.

A very impressive feature of the concept is a pair of long gullwing doors that were used instead of the usual four-door layout. But Ferruccio Lamborghini wasn’t very pleased about this kind of doors: "offer no privacy: a lady’s legs would be there for all to see."This feature offered the possibility of using windows which, combined with a lightly smoked glass roof, helped create a very airy feeling inside the cabin. The interior features a a hexagonal honeycomb theme on the dashboard and center console housing most instruments and controls.

Hit the jump for a video.

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1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV Prototype auctioned for $1.705 Million

1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV Prototype auctioned for $1.705 Million

March 11 will remain as a very important date in the history. For Japan is a date when disaster started, but for Lamborghini is a very happy date: a 1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV Prototype has been auctioned for a $1.705 Million - a world record for a Lamborghini Miura. At the same auction a 1951 Ferrari 212 Export Cabriolet has been sold for $1,870,000.

Compared to a standard Miura, the SV (Spinto Veloce) version features a stronger chassis, different rear suspension, a stronger engine, the lack of "eyelashes" around the headlights, wider rear fenders. The more powerful V12 engine delivers an impressive 415 HP and was mated to a 5-Speed Manual Gearbox. The SV version made the 0 to 60 mph sprint in 6.5 seconds and was capable of a top speed of 186 mph.

Miura SV made its first appearance at the 1971 Geneva Auto Show and there were only 150 units produced.

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1971 Lamborghini Miura SV Jota for auction

1971 Lamborghini Miura SV Jota for auction

In 1970, Lamborghini developed a Jota test mule that would conform to the FIA’s Appendix J racing regulations. The car was appropriately named the Miura Jota. However, this was the only mule ever built until customers heard about it and asked for it. At their request, Lamborghini has decided to develop five units of the Lamborghini Jota: two were built new and three were converted from existing SVs.

One of these five unique models is now available for order and will be auctioned off at the RM Auctions’ Automobiles of London auction event on October 27th. This Jota was extensively restored by marque specialist Gary Bobileff, and is expected to fetch between £800,000-£1,100,000 GBP, or roughly $1,243,000-$1,709,000.

Aside from the rare Jota, RM Auctions will also be auctioning off the sole remaining documented 007 Aston Martin DB5 movie car, Sir Stirling Moss’s Grand Prix-winning four wheel-drive 1961 Ferguson P99 Formula One racer, and a stunning six-cylinder 1936 MG NB Magnette Airline Coupe.

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Russo And Steele Monterey auction results: Keep your Countach!

Russo And Steele Monterey auction results: Keep your Countach!

With all the events taking place in Monterey, California every August, the Russo and Steele event is a must go. It is much smaller than the Scottsdale auction but it is certaintly Monterey styled for the VIPs. Nonetheless, there were over 150 cars running over the auction block for a combined total of over $10 million in sales.

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