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You Will Never See a 1974 Lamborghini Countach Being Driven Like This In The Real World

You Will Never See a 1974 Lamborghini Countach Being Driven Like This In The Real World

Watch as a virtual 1974 Lamborghini Countach gets driven on the limit, consequence-free, in Gran Turismo 7

For most of us, owning or driving an iconic classic like the Lamborghini Countach is, sadly, a distant mirage. Even those few that can afford to own one, preserve them and, more often than not, turn these automotive legends into “garage queens”. Things are quite different in the meta-verse, however, where thrashing any car has zero consequences. We don’t normally post gameplay footage, but when you have a game that looks as good as Gran Turismo 7, it’s all worth it. Enjoy as this 1974 Countach gets virtually put through its paces on an Italian racetrack.

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Fast and Forgotten - Rarest and Coolest Lamborghinis from the Past Century

Fast and Forgotten - Rarest and Coolest Lamborghinis from the Past Century

Old Lambos bring with them a sense of occasion that none of its contemporary counterparts could manage back in the day, especially the cars flagged off under the reign of Ferruccio Lamborghini himself. Over the years, there have been plenty of limited runs and one-off Lamborghinis from the Diablo VT 6.0 SE to the Sesto Elemento and Sian, but in this article, we will take a look at some of the rarest and relatively unknown series production Lamborghini’s made in the 20th century.

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Celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the Lamborghini Jalpa With These Awesome Pictures

Celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the Lamborghini Jalpa With These Awesome Pictures

2021 celebrates the 40th anniversary of the Lamborghini Jalpa

We love celebrating car birthdays and this year is the Lamborghini Jalpa’s 40th anniversary. The car that was once considered the entry-level Lamborghini has now become 40 years old, having been produced between 1981 and 1988. With only 410 units produced, it certainly is rare and prices have started to reflect that. Here’s a brief overview of the 1980s “Baby Lambo”.

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Stunning Recreation of the Lamborghini Countach LP500 Prototype Is Born

Stunning Recreation of the Lamborghini Countach LP500 Prototype Is Born

"Polo Storico" brought back the LP500 from the dead, a car that started it all and changed the automotive landscape forever nearly 50 years ago

Lamborghini has resurrected the Countach LP500 prototype in this recreation based on the original, a car that was first revealed to the press at the 1971 Geneva Motor show. However, during subsequent testing, the supercar was destroyed.

But now, after 25,000 painstaking hours of restoration, Lamborghini has brought back the original LP 500 from the dead to celebrate the iconic car’s 50th anniversary. The car seen here is using the underpinnings of a Aventador LPI 800-4.

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Let Magnus Walker Teach You About the Lamborghini Espada and Ferrari 308 GT4

Let Magnus Walker Teach You About the Lamborghini Espada and Ferrari 308 GT4

If you’re in the classic car market for a quirky Italian, you might want to listen to Mr. Walker here

You don’t need us to tell you who Magnus Walker is, however, you might want to know that he’s part of this gig with Hagerty where he scours the car world in the search for future classics. The YouTube show is called The Next Big Thing with Magnus Walker (obviously) and it’s rapidly turning into one of our all-time favorites.

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1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero

1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero

The Islero was the first Lamborghini with hidden pop-up headlights and the first designed by Mario Marazzi. Its appearance seemed somewhat dull even next to the Espada, not to mention the Miura. The 400 GT version was quickly followed by the improved 400 GTS that soldiered on until 1970 when the Islero was replaced by the Jarama.

Lamborghini was truly prolific in its first few years as an automaker. Ferruccio Lamborghini’s men put the 350 GT into production in 1964 and then, only two years later, the bigger, more powerful 400 GT arrived. At the same time, the stunning Gandini-penned Miura dropped and, for 1968, Lamborghini readied up two new cars: the Islero which replaced the 400 GT and an even bigger grand tourer, the Espada. Lamborghini’s wave didn’t last much longer, though, and, by the mid-’70s, the company was in financial hot water.

The Islero name comes from a Miura-breed bull that killed the famous matador Manuel Rodriquez in August of 1947.

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1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

More than just a rebodied Urraco

Lamborghini launched the Silhouette in 1976 as an attempt to appease customers that didn’t buy the Urraco, the company’s first V-8 model, with a car that featured the same underpinnings but a more modern styling in tune with the Countach. Sadly for Lamborghini, it didn’t work out, but Lamborghini still had the Jalpa up its sleeve.

The Silhouette was a more angular-looking sports car, in tone with the Countach. It had square, flared wheel arches, an aggressive nose, and a sleek rear section with two black air vents covering the area aft of the B-pillar. The wheels were also new and they would go on to become a sort of a staple on Lamborghini models. The Silhouette was also one of the few to not be named after a fighting bull or a breed of bulls and the first from Sant’Agata Bolognese to feature a removable targa top.

The Silhouette, in keeping with the budget sportscar ethos pushed forward by Ferruccio when conceiving the Urraco, was never meant to be an out-and-out performer. As such, with a 3.0-liter V-8 behind the seats, the power output was advertised at a docile 266 horsepower - 40 less than a modern-day Seat Leon Cupra R hot hatch- with a resulting top speed of 162 mph or 12 mph less than a de-restricted Audi RS3 hot hatch that you can buy in 2018.

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1970 - 1976 Lamborghini Jarama

1970 - 1976 Lamborghini Jarama

Lamborghini’s most tasteful deep cut

The Lamborghini Jarama made its way into production in 1970 as a replacement for the Islero and proved to be the Italian supercar manufacturer’s last front-engined V-12 grand tourer. While shorter than the Espada, the Jarama still offered seating for four and had the same engine.

By the late ’60s, Lamborghini was a bivalent company: it was both offering an out-and-out supercar, the tremendous Miura, and a couple laid-back grand tourers built with comfort, luxury, and practicality in mind. When it came time to replace the smaller of the two tourers, namely the Islero, Lamborghini decided to turn from Carrozzeria Marazzi, who’d been behind the Islero, to Bertone.

The car that resulted was a strange thing: it sat low and wide but was also quite short. It came with Miura-style magnesium wheels but it was way heavier than the mid-engined supercar due to its all-steel construction. The first batch of cars was dodgy at best, in typical Italian fashion, but the Jarama S turned out to be an enjoyable highway runner.

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1973 - 1979 Lamborghini Urraco

1973 - 1979 Lamborghini Urraco

The underrated baby mid-engined Lamborghini of the ’70s

The Urraco heralded Lamborghini’s entry in the budget supercar niche. It was available in a number of guises, the P200, P250, and P300. Less than 800 units of this sleek V-8 mid-engined Italian beauty were sold before production ceased back in 1979. In spite of its rarity, the Urraco still fails to command the kind of prices you’ll see early Dinos being sold for.

Presented at the 1970 Turin Auto Show, the Urraco hit the market two years later as an affordable 2+2 supercar that wasn’t really a supercar and stood in either the Miura’s or the Countach’s shadow throughout its lifespan. Its design, penned by Marcello Gandini during his stint at Bertone, leaves something to be desired as far as dramatism goes with the more dedicated 2-seater Merak from Maserati being clearly the best-looking budget supercar at the time.

For all its shortcomings, many of which were mocked during a Top Gear episode which centered around the Merak, the Dino 308 GT4 and the Urraco, the Urraco was considered a brilliant car by Lamborghini engineers as it incorporated a number of industry firsts and other novel ideas for the early ’70s, many of which have been forgotten as time wore on and the scissor doors of the Countach turned the heads of just about any automotive aficionado.

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Lamborghini restores Espada and Islero for their 50th anniversary celebrations

Lamborghini restores Espada and Islero for their 50th anniversary celebrations

Iconic Lambos will also go on a tour across central Italy

In a time when modern supercars are defined by how outlandish they can look, the Lamborghini Espada and Lamborghini Islero provide reminders that there once was a time when “sexy” didn’t always equate to having the most menacing-looking car in the business. The two Italian icons are still considered two of the finest Lamborghinis ever created, and as the two celebrate their golden jubilee, Lamborghini announced that it has successfully restored the Islero and the Espada that belong to the Lamborghini Museum.

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Lamborghini's Hollywood Cars Are Now On Display in Its Headquarters

Lamborghini’s Hollywood Cars Are Now On Display in Its Headquarters

Some of the most iconic movie Lambos are all together in the same place

Lamborghini may not have the same Hollywood roots as Ford or Aston Martin, but the Italian automaker has made its presence felt on the silver screen. Now, we get to see all of it in the same place at the same time. Head over to the company’s headquarters in Sant’Agata Bolognese, and take a trip to the Lamborghini Museum. That’s where you’ll find the exhibit, “Film Emotions — Lamborghini and the World of Cinema,” where you’ll see some of the most famous Lamborghinis that have been featured in Hollywood movies.

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1971 - 1972 Lamborghini Miura SV

1971 - 1972 Lamborghini Miura SV

The Lamborghini Miura SV, also known as the P400SV, was introduced in 1971. Essentially an updated Miura S, the SV was the last and most famous Miura. Produced in significantly smaller numbers than the previous versions, the SV is also the rarest Miura as well. Although visual updates were mostly subtle, the Miura SV featured extensive drivetrain and chassis upgrades that enhanced both the output and the handling of the car.

The oil crisis and the lack of demand prompted Lamborghini to halt Miura production in 1973, the same year it launched the Urraco, its first of only two sports cars powered by V-8 engines. The Miura was replaced by the Countach in 1974, a vehicle the company had been working on since 1970.

Shortly before the Miura was discontinued, Ferruccio sold off his controlling shares of the Lamborghini company. Word has it he retired because he achieved everything he had set out to do with the Miura.

Updated 08/24/2016: A very cool Lamborghini Miura P400 SV by Bertone was brought by RM Sotheby’s at the 2016 Monterey Car Week, where unfortunately it failed to sell. The car was estimated to go down for $1,900,000 - $2,200,000. Check the "Pictures" tab for some images taken at the event.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lamborghini Miura SV.

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