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Lamborghini Says It Can Produce the Sterrato Concept At a Profit

Lamborghini Says It Can Produce the Sterrato Concept At a Profit

Lamborghini’s business case for the Huracan Sterrato actually works

What strange times we’re living in. Lamborghini officially acknowledged that the company could produce a freaking Sterrato Concept (an off-road Huracan), and make money on it, while, for example, Toyota struggles to make the Camry profitable. Lamborghini chief technical officer Maurizio Reggiani acknowledged that "even though the budget is quite tight—it always is at Lamborghini—the provisional business case suggests that we can build this car [Sterrato] at a profit." But are we going to see it? And when?

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Look In Awe At The Freshly Restored 1968 Lamborghini Miura That Starred In The Italian Job

Look In Awe At The Freshly Restored 1968 Lamborghini Miura That Starred In The Italian Job

The orange beauty that was for sale less than four years ago has been restored by Lamborghini’s Polo Storico to look better than new

Many generations of car guys watched in disbelief as the orange Miura that shows up to drop jaws as it drives down one of Italy’s many strips of winding road in the opening minutes of the classic 1969 movie ’The Italian Job’ never exits that tunnel in one piece. The good news is that the car we see traversing the Grand Saint Bernard Pass survived the filming and here’s what’s even better: the car that was considered to be the one used during filming was certified by Lamborghini as being genuine and then was restored by the Italian company’s Polo Storico department that specializes in nut-and-bolt restorations.

Can a car roar its way into the folklore of motion pictures after appearing on screen for a grand total of four minutes? If that car is Lamborghini’s first mid-engined car, the Miura, then the answer is yes. Granted, it helps that the said movie isn’t some C-rated afterthought of a movie that barely made its way on home video but a masterpiece starring Michael Caine and a trifecta of Minis that were so iconic they got a reboot by the time the BMW-engineered Mini Cooper was launched in the early noughties.

But the Miura remains the unsung four-wheeled hero of that movie and, now, that very P400, chassis #3586, is shiny and its leather sparkling. Having said that, everything is else is as it’ should be: the driving position is still unpleasant, and the bulky center console with those six Jaeger dials looks notoriously out of place. Did they forget about it and just added the whole thing at once before sending the first finished car to the Geneva Auto Show in 1966? Does it matter? Well, not really. You tend to not question cult classics.

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Lamborghini Doesn't Have a Plug-in Hybrid Supercar Yet and There's a Damn Good Reason Why

Lamborghini Doesn’t Have a Plug-in Hybrid Supercar Yet and There’s a Damn Good Reason Why

Lambo’s late to the party, but expect it to arrive guns blazin’

Just as the entire supercar world found itself drawn into the world of hybridization, Lamborghini has steadfastly stood its ground, showing unfailing commitment to its yoke of naturally aspirated V-10 and V-12 engines. That’s all about to change, though, now that the higher-ups at Sant’Agata Bolognese have confirmed plans to launch its first-ever plug-in hybrid hypercar. Don’t look now, but the latest intel surrounding this upcoming model has ties to both the Aventador and the Terzo Millennio Concept that Lambo proudly showed off back in 2017. What does the Italian automaker have in store for the rest of the hypercar world? A game-changer of unworldly proportions.

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Kids Have It Good These Days - They Can Even Learn to Drive in a Lamborghini Aventador

Kids Have It Good These Days - They Can Even Learn to Drive in a Lamborghini Aventador

For the amount that you need to pay, you might us well buy a new car and learn from that

A Lamborghini Aventador is not the kind of car you’d expect to be used as a learner car. But once again, reality has proven to be stranger than fiction because U.K.based driving tutorial company Get Licensed is offering you a chance to learn how to drive an Aventador. No, this isn’t some kind of belated April’s Fool prank or a gimmick meant to draw people into the company’s website where they can book learning sessions with a 1996 Honda Civic. The Lamborghini Aventador learner car is a real thing, and if you want to take Get Licensed up on its offer, you’re going to have to book 10 sessions with the Aventador for a princely sum of £20,000. That’s around $26,140 based on current exchange rates. Would you be interested to pay that much to learn how to drive a Lamborghini Aventador over a period of 10 sessions? Seems like a lot of people are.

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Watch a Lamborghini Aventador LP750-4 Covered in 2 Million Swarovski Crystals Cause Chaos in London

Watch a Lamborghini Aventador LP750-4 Covered in 2 Million Swarovski Crystals Cause Chaos in London

A bedazzled bull stops traffic, but all we wanna know is “why??”

The Lamborghini Aventador LP 750-4 SuperVeloce is an incredible machine, meticulously built to dispense speed at every opportunity thanks to a plethora of carbon fiber weight-saving measures, advanced aerodynamics, and a fire-breathing 6.5-liter V-12 engine. However, all that won’t stop someone with too much time, too much money, and not enough taste from utterly ruining it, as evidenced by this particular example covered in 2 million Swarovski crystals.

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2019 Lamborghini Huracan Evo

2019 Lamborghini Huracan Evo

A mid-cycle facelift with aggressive looks and more power

The Lamborghini Huracan Evo is the mid-cycle facelift of the company’s entry-level supercar. Although it’s described as a new-generation model, it’s exactly what the name says, an evolution of the nameplate. It was introduced in early 2019, almost five years after the Huracan went into production.

Design-wise, the Evo is based on the higher performance Huracan Performante. It features more aggressive front and rear ends, as well as a bespoke set of wheels. Inside the cabin, there’s an infotainment system with a big touchscreen, while motivation comes from the beefed-up engine from the Performante. While it won’t set a new Nurburgring record, the Evo is notably quicker than its predecessor. Let’s find out more about that in the review below.

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Someone Just Wrapped a Lamborghini Huracan Performante Around a Tree

Someone Just Wrapped a Lamborghini Huracan Performante Around a Tree

Considering the mountain of performance that is the Huracan Performante, it’s not surprising someone was overwhelbmed by it

The Lamborghini Huracan Performante is a Huracan dialed up to 11. It’s lighter, more powerful, and more nimble than the standard model but all the extra performance doesn’t blend well with an over-enthusiastic driver. This particular fellow wanted to show-off the launch control feature on his Huracan Performante but, instead, managed to prove how safe the Huracan is after crashing side-on into a tree and a wall.

Reporting on yet another crash involving a supercar may seem a bit daft especially since they seem to happen with an awkward regularity. Once every two or three weeks we hear about someone who overstepped it on the public roads and ends up with a bent exotic car. It barely ever happens during a track day, but you can decide if that means anything or not. This time, however, we’ve got another Huracan Performante that’s in the gutter after its owner banged it up pretty severely while attempting to leave a car meet in London as if he knew what he was doing. It’s safe to assume he didn’t quite know what he was doing.

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Lamborghini Won't Offer the Aventador or Huracan With a Manual Transmission Because It's Too Expensive

Lamborghini Won’t Offer the Aventador or Huracan With a Manual Transmission Because It’s Too Expensive

Who would’ve thought that developing bespoke transmission for limited-edition models would be greenlighted?

Regardless of your take on manual transmissions, you can’t deny the added layer of involvement they provide to the driving experience. This is why it’s sad that modern supercar makers have all but ruled out the usage of such old-school transmissions for the sake of both costs and performance. Lamborghini is one of them although they were close to offering one on some special edition Huracan and Aventador models.

You and I both know that a robotized automatic transmission with one or multiple clutches is quicker at shifting through gears than any biped creature we commonly refer to as a human. In spite of this, you and I both would like to be able to do things our way, at our own pace. Of course, that’s what flappy paddle gearboxes are for, but there’s nothing quite like the added difficulty of a third pedal and a stick between the seats. Lamborghini has been telling us for years that the manual is dead - at least as far as it’s concerned - but the Italians prove they are genuine petrolheads because, in the meantime, they did at least look into it to make sure once again that the initial assessment was right. Props to Sant’Agata for that!

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Lamborghini's First Hybrid will Debut in Frankfurt as - You Guessed It - a Special Edition Model

Lamborghini’s First Hybrid will Debut in Frankfurt as - You Guessed It - a Special Edition Model

It’s limited to just 63 units as a nod to 1963, the year Lamborghini first entered our lives

The wait for Lamborghini’s first hybrid supercar will come to an end at the 2019 Frankfurt Motor Show. The yet-to-be-named hybrid monster is a touchpoint for the Italian automaker as it lays the foundation for its own hybrid plans for the future. For now, the hybrid supercar goes by the name “LB48H.” Details are still scarce at this point, but Lamborghini is expected to take styling cues from the Terzo Millenio EV Concept it unveiled last year and graft them onto the hybrid supercar. This model also holds the distinction for being the rarest among all hybrid exotics that have been released in recent years. Lamborghini’s building only 63 units — the 63-car volume is a nod to 1963, the year Lamborghini was born — and, unfortunately for all of us, all 63 units are already accounted for.

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There's a Reason Why The 2019 Lamborghini Huracan EVO is Missing The "LP610-4" Name

There’s a Reason Why The 2019 Lamborghini Huracan EVO is Missing The "LP610-4" Name

Lamborghini wants the names of its models to sound more marketable

If Lamborghini didn’t stray from its traditional naming strategy, the Lamborghini Huracan Evo would technically carry the name Huracan Evo LP610-4. But, Lamborghini decided to drop the Huracan Evo’s alphanumeric name, in part because the automaker wanted to make it easier for its consumers to understand the model’s identity. Purists may cringe at the thought of not seeing the LP610-4 designation on the Huracan Evo, but from Lamborghini’s perspective, it’s easier to sell the Huracan Evo without the alphanumeric designation that a lot of consumers find confusing. Lamborghini refused to say if it’s going to stick with this new naming strategy, but while it is easier to market the Huracan Evo without the LP610-4 in the name, it’s still going to take some getting used to, especially from those who have developed an affinity for Lamborghini’s alphanumeric names.

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1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero

1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero

The Islero was the first Lamborghini with hidden pop-up headlights and the first designed by Mario Marazzi. Its appearance seemed somewhat dull even next to the Espada, not to mention the Miura. The 400 GT version was quickly followed by the improved 400 GTS that soldiered on until 1970 when the Islero was replaced by the Jarama.

Lamborghini was truly prolific in its first few years as an automaker. Ferruccio Lamborghini’s men put the 350 GT into production in 1964 and then, only two years later, the bigger, more powerful 400 GT arrived. At the same time, the stunning Gandini-penned Miura dropped and, for 1968, Lamborghini readied up two new cars: the Islero which replaced the 400 GT and an even bigger grand tourer, the Espada. Lamborghini’s wave didn’t last much longer, though, and, by the mid-’70s, the company was in financial hot water.

The Islero name comes from a Miura-breed bull that killed the famous matador Manuel Rodriquez in August of 1947.

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1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

More than just a rebodied Urraco

Lamborghini launched the Silhouette in 1976 as an attempt to appease customers that didn’t buy the Urraco, the company’s first V-8 model, with a car that featured the same underpinnings but a more modern styling in tune with the Countach. Sadly for Lamborghini, it didn’t work out, but Lamborghini still had the Jalpa up its sleeve.

The Silhouette was a more angular-looking sports car, in tone with the Countach. It had square, flared wheel arches, an aggressive nose, and a sleek rear section with two black air vents covering the area aft of the B-pillar. The wheels were also new and they would go on to become a sort of a staple on Lamborghini models. The Silhouette was also one of the few to not be named after a fighting bull or a breed of bulls and the first from Sant’Agata Bolognese to feature a removable targa top.

The Silhouette, in keeping with the budget sportscar ethos pushed forward by Ferruccio when conceiving the Urraco, was never meant to be an out-and-out performer. As such, with a 3.0-liter V-8 behind the seats, the power output was advertised at a docile 266 horsepower - 40 less than a modern-day Seat Leon Cupra R hot hatch- with a resulting top speed of 162 mph or 12 mph less than a de-restricted Audi RS3 hot hatch that you can buy in 2018.

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