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2020 Lamborghini Sian FKP 37

2020 Lamborghini Sian FKP 37

A raging electrified bull, the first in Lamborghini’s history

The 2020 Lamborghini Sian is a hybrid supercar that the Italian firm unveiled ahead of the 2019 Frankfurt Motor Show. Powered by a V-12 gasoline engine and an electric motor, the Sian is Lambo’s first mass-produced hybrid. However, the supercar is limited to only 63 units, so it’s actually a preview of things to come, like an electrified successor to the Aventador.

Design-wise, the Sian stands on its own by combining a new design language with styling cues inspired by the iconic Lamborghini Countach. Its interior, on the other hand, is based on the Aventador’s, albeit it comes with bespoke elements and fancier features. The Sian also showcases innovative technology, like a state-of-the-art energy recuperating system and a supercapacitor instead of a traditional lithium-ion battery. Let’s find out more about that in the review below.

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2019 Lamborghini Huracan EVO GT Celebration

2019 Lamborghini Huracan EVO GT Celebration

Lambo pays tribute to the Huracan GT3 Evo’s victories at Daytona and Sebring with a special edition Huracan

This is the Lamborghini Huracan Evo GT Celebration. It’s dressed up in orange and green, two colors that typically don’t look good together — except during Halloween — but Lamborghini somehow found a way to do it. Beyond its aesthetics, the Huracan Evo GT Celebration is an important car for Lamborghini. It’s a special edition model that was created to celebrate the Huracan GT3 Evo’s successful conquests of the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 12 Hours of Sebring, which it did in two consecutive years. Only 36 units of the Huracan Evo GT Celebration will be built and all 36 units are earmarked for the North American market with deliveries scheduled to begin in early 2020. For those of you looking to score one of the most unique special edition Lamborghini Huracans you’ll ever see, the Huracan Evo GT Celebration is probably as unique as it’s going to get.

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Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato

Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato

The mighty Huracan goes off-roading!

The 2019 Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato is an experimental concept car that the Italian firm launched in June 2019. As the name suggests, the Sterrato is based on the 2019 Huracan supercar, but unlike standard sibling it includes off-road-specific features and technology from the Urus SUV. Described as a "super sportscar for challenging environments," the Huracan Sterrato also pays tribute to similar experimental vehicles from Lamborghini’s storied past.

The 2019 Huracan Sterrato may be an usual vehicle for a company like Lamborghini, but it’s not the first of its kind. Back in the 1970s, test driver Bob Wallace modified several production Lamborghini’s to create unique performance cars. Two of them, the Jarama Rally (1973) and Urraco Rally (1974), featured off-road-specific suspensions and upgrades designed for rally racing. Almost 50 years later and Lamborghini is revisiting its off-road supercar legacy with the 2019 Huracan Sterrato.

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2019 Lamborghini Huracan Evo

2019 Lamborghini Huracan Evo

A mid-cycle facelift with aggressive looks and more power

The Lamborghini Huracan Evo is the mid-cycle facelift of the company’s entry-level supercar. Although it’s described as a new-generation model, it’s exactly what the name says, an evolution of the nameplate. It was introduced in early 2019, almost five years after the Huracan went into production.

Design-wise, the Evo is based on the higher performance Huracan Performante. It features more aggressive front and rear ends, as well as a bespoke set of wheels. Inside the cabin, there’s an infotainment system with a big touchscreen, while motivation comes from the beefed-up engine from the Performante. While it won’t set a new Nurburgring record, the Evo is notably quicker than its predecessor. Let’s find out more about that in the review below.

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1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero

1968 - 1970 Lamborghini Islero

The Islero was the first Lamborghini with hidden pop-up headlights and the first designed by Mario Marazzi. Its appearance seemed somewhat dull even next to the Espada, not to mention the Miura. The 400 GT version was quickly followed by the improved 400 GTS that soldiered on until 1970 when the Islero was replaced by the Jarama.

Lamborghini was truly prolific in its first few years as an automaker. Ferruccio Lamborghini’s men put the 350 GT into production in 1964 and then, only two years later, the bigger, more powerful 400 GT arrived. At the same time, the stunning Gandini-penned Miura dropped and, for 1968, Lamborghini readied up two new cars: the Islero which replaced the 400 GT and an even bigger grand tourer, the Espada. Lamborghini’s wave didn’t last much longer, though, and, by the mid-’70s, the company was in financial hot water.

The Islero name comes from a Miura-breed bull that killed the famous matador Manuel Rodriquez in August of 1947.

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1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

More than just a rebodied Urraco

Lamborghini launched the Silhouette in 1976 as an attempt to appease customers that didn’t buy the Urraco, the company’s first V-8 model, with a car that featured the same underpinnings but a more modern styling in tune with the Countach. Sadly for Lamborghini, it didn’t work out, but Lamborghini still had the Jalpa up its sleeve.

The Silhouette was a more angular-looking sports car, in tone with the Countach. It had square, flared wheel arches, an aggressive nose, and a sleek rear section with two black air vents covering the area aft of the B-pillar. The wheels were also new and they would go on to become a sort of a staple on Lamborghini models. The Silhouette was also one of the few to not be named after a fighting bull or a breed of bulls and the first from Sant’Agata Bolognese to feature a removable targa top.

The Silhouette, in keeping with the budget sportscar ethos pushed forward by Ferruccio when conceiving the Urraco, was never meant to be an out-and-out performer. As such, with a 3.0-liter V-8 behind the seats, the power output was advertised at a docile 266 horsepower - 40 less than a modern-day Seat Leon Cupra R hot hatch- with a resulting top speed of 162 mph or 12 mph less than a de-restricted Audi RS3 hot hatch that you can buy in 2018.

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1970 - 1976 Lamborghini Jarama

1970 - 1976 Lamborghini Jarama

Lamborghini’s most tasteful deep cut

The Lamborghini Jarama made its way into production in 1970 as a replacement for the Islero and proved to be the Italian supercar manufacturer’s last front-engined V-12 grand tourer. While shorter than the Espada, the Jarama still offered seating for four and had the same engine.

By the late ’60s, Lamborghini was a bivalent company: it was both offering an out-and-out supercar, the tremendous Miura, and a couple laid-back grand tourers built with comfort, luxury, and practicality in mind. When it came time to replace the smaller of the two tourers, namely the Islero, Lamborghini decided to turn from Carrozzeria Marazzi, who’d been behind the Islero, to Bertone.

The car that resulted was a strange thing: it sat low and wide but was also quite short. It came with Miura-style magnesium wheels but it was way heavier than the mid-engined supercar due to its all-steel construction. The first batch of cars was dodgy at best, in typical Italian fashion, but the Jarama S turned out to be an enjoyable highway runner.

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1973 - 1979 Lamborghini Urraco

1973 - 1979 Lamborghini Urraco

The underrated baby mid-engined Lamborghini of the ’70s

The Urraco heralded Lamborghini’s entry in the budget supercar niche. It was available in a number of guises, the P200, P250, and P300. Less than 800 units of this sleek V-8 mid-engined Italian beauty were sold before production ceased back in 1979. In spite of its rarity, the Urraco still fails to command the kind of prices you’ll see early Dinos being sold for.

Presented at the 1970 Turin Auto Show, the Urraco hit the market two years later as an affordable 2+2 supercar that wasn’t really a supercar and stood in either the Miura’s or the Countach’s shadow throughout its lifespan. Its design, penned by Marcello Gandini during his stint at Bertone, leaves something to be desired as far as dramatism goes with the more dedicated 2-seater Merak from Maserati being clearly the best-looking budget supercar at the time.

For all its shortcomings, many of which were mocked during a Top Gear episode which centered around the Merak, the Dino 308 GT4 and the Urraco, the Urraco was considered a brilliant car by Lamborghini engineers as it incorporated a number of industry firsts and other novel ideas for the early ’70s, many of which have been forgotten as time wore on and the scissor doors of the Countach turned the heads of just about any automotive aficionado.

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2019 Lamborghini SC18 Alston

2019 Lamborghini SC18 Alston

A one-off supercar with aero inspired by the world of motorsport

From the outrageous styling, to the thumping V-12 powerplant, to the breathtaking performance, the Lamborghini Aventador SVJ is anything but boring. But that’s not stopping one lucky owner from turning the volume knob up to 11 on their Raging Bull. Say hello to the SC18 Alston, which comes with race-spec aero and a track-ready attitude to set it apart from its more “standard” brethren. And although it’s designed for track use, the SC18 Alston is still road-legal, bringing the best of both worlds into wing-tastic harmony.

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2019 Lamborghini Huracán GT3 EVO

2019 Lamborghini Huracán GT3 EVO

Lamborghini has revealed the most aggressive version of its smallest offering, the $430,000 Huracan GT3 Evo racer, which as its name suggests, is an evolution of the original Huracan GT3. It improves the first GT3 in several ways and is available for purchase both as a standalone model or as an upgrade for any existing Huracan GT3.

Winning not only the GT Asia Series Championship in 2016, as well as the Rolex 24 at Daytona and 12 Hours of Sebring, the Huracan GT3, has proven highly successful, and the Evo is further refined and enhanced to bring out its qualities. The main point of focus was enhancing the car’s aerodynamics with the help of the Dallara Engineering.

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2018 Lamborghini Aventador S by Mansory

2018 Lamborghini Aventador S by Mansory

Mansory Went Crazy With Carbon On The Aventador S

Mansory, a tuner famed for its controversial and extraordinary carbon works, revealed its new tuning package for the Lamborghini Aventador S. You may still be smitten by the exceptionality of the Nurburgring king, but even this Mansory work will get your heart pumping. If nothing, because of the incredible amount of carbon fiber the tuner invested in its latest Lambo work.

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2019 Lamborghini Aventador SVJ 63

2019 Lamborghini Aventador SVJ 63

For those times when a half-a-million-dollar supercar still isn’t enough

If the Lamborghini Aventador SuperVeloce Jota (SVJ) isn’t rare enough for you, you’ll be happy to know that a 63-unit Aventador SVJ 63 Special Edition is also available from Lamborghini. The rarer Aventador SVJ 63 carries that name as a nod to 1963, the year patriarch Ferruccio Lamborghini founded the company. Lamborghini has yet to release the price for the Aventador SVJ 63, but expect it to be heavier on the pockets compared to the $517,770 price tag of the “standard” Aventador SVJ.

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