Models

view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
Watch a Lamborghini Huracan Performante Race a MIG-29K Fighter Jet

Watch a Lamborghini Huracan Performante Race a MIG-29K Fighter Jet

Italy’s finest versus Russian military engineering

We’ve seen plenty of supercar battles on airstrips before, but this one’s a bit different from the rest. Posted to Twitter by user @Chopsyturvey, it’s an abbreviated 44-second clip that shows a head-to-head acceleration battle between a Lamborghini Huracan Performante and a MIG-29K fighter jet, combining horsepower and firepower into a single brief video.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
2019 ARES Project Panther

2019 ARES Project Panther

An Italian boutique supercar-maker gears up to make a good first impression

Although it’s just a few years old, ARES Design is already creating a bit of a name for itself. Founded back in 2014 by Dany Bahar, former CEO at Lotus, the firm started out as a customization shop for high-end automobiles. Now, however, ARES Design is looking to break into the world of boutique supercar production, and Project Panther is its first effort to step up to the big leagues.

Continue reading to learn more about the ARES Project Panther.

Read more
Lamborghini restores Espada and Islero for their 50th anniversary celebrations

Lamborghini restores Espada and Islero for their 50th anniversary celebrations

Iconic Lambos will also go on a tour across central Italy

In a time when modern supercars are defined by how outlandish they can look, the Lamborghini Espada and Lamborghini Islero provide reminders that there once was a time when “sexy” didn’t always equate to having the most menacing-looking car in the business. The two Italian icons are still considered two of the finest Lamborghinis ever created, and as the two celebrate their golden jubilee, Lamborghini announced that it has successfully restored the Islero and the Espada that belong to the Lamborghini Museum.

Read more
2018 Lamborghini Huracan Performante by Novitec

2018 Lamborghini Huracan Performante by Novitec

Still waiting on those engine mods, though

Only a few days ago, McLaren revealed that mad 600LT. Just then I wondered what it would be like to see a “baby” McLaren LT go against a “baby” Lamborghini Performante on the other side of the track. But then, Novitec (FYI - a German tuning company) and its Torado division revealed the Huracan Performante Novitec. It is like a Performante version of the Performante Lamborghini. Maybe an overkill, but Novitec did it so well, I don’t even care. I need to see the 600LT race against this now.

Read more
Pray to the Heavens That The Lamborghini L595 Roadster Becomes Reality

Pray to the Heavens That The Lamborghini L595 Roadster Becomes Reality

It says "2018" on the Zagato website so let’s cross our fingers that it comes to life

Four years ago, Italian coach builder Zagato unveiled the Lamborghini 5-95 Zagato, a one-off creation that spawned into a limited edition series because deep-pocketed customers couldn’t get enough of it. Fast forward to 2018, and we could be in for a case of déjà vu. Sitting on Zagato’s website for all the world to see is a rendering of the Lamborghini L595 Zagato, a droptop version of the 5-95 Zagato that we saw in 2014. It’s unclear if Zagato has plans to build this version, but the image was accompanied by “2018,” a sign that we could see this car come to life sometime this year.

Read more
Car for Sale: 1,400HP, Tuned-Out 2006 Lamborghini Gallardo

Car for Sale: 1,400HP, Tuned-Out 2006 Lamborghini Gallardo

There’s no turning back after getting in the seat of this rocket

For the confused few who actually think that Lamborghinis are slow, Underground Racing has become the go-to place to get the supercar’s power figures up to “appreciable” levels. The North Carolina-based tuner is known for turning Lambos into certified eaters of worlds, and it just so happens that one of them is up for sale now.

Read more
Video of the Day: Watch Lamborghini's Whole Model History in Under Seven Minutes

Video of the Day: Watch Lamborghini’s Whole Model History in Under Seven Minutes

There’s a lot to be learned in this video

If you’re only going to watch one car video today, my request is for you to watch this video. Prepared by YouTube channel Cars Evolution, this is a seven-minute video dedicated entirely to the history of Lamborghini’s models, dating back to the 350 GT, the automaker’s first-ever production car, all the way to the Urus, it’s most recent model. Along the way, you’ll also get to know some interesting facts about each of Lambo’s models. Think you know everything there is to know about Lamborghini’s mode history? Watch this video and find out.

Read more
Kia Pits The Forte Against The Lamborghini Aventador in Hilarious Ad

Kia Pits The Forte Against The Lamborghini Aventador in Hilarious Ad

Korean automaker makes a lot of fair points!

The Kia Forte and the Lamborghini Aventador are two cars that couldn’t be more different from each other. One is a compact four-door sedan while the other is, well, you know what the Aventador is. On the surface, the Aventador beats the Forte in just about every meaningful discussion. But is the Lamborghini really that much better than the Forte? Kia (obviously) doesn’t think so, and believe it or not; it actually makes a compelling case for its own sedan.

Go ahead and watch the video. Tell me you didn’t get a good laugh out of it. I certainly did. Kia’s justifications for the Forte are all fair. The sedan does have two more doors than the supercar. It also has a big advantage in rear seating, cargo space, touch-screen capability, and wireless charging. It even has the Aventador beat in fuel efficiency and cost. It’s true that you can buy a Forte for a tenth of the price of an Aventador. You can even use the money you saved on something else, including that villa in Italy the voice-over guy suggested. By these metrics, the Forte wins hands down!

In all seriousness, the “rivalry” between the Forte and Aventador is tongue-firmly-planted-in-cheek humor. Give credit to Kia for thinking outside the box with the angle for this commercial. It takes a certain kind of confidence to roll out an Aventador opposite a Forte, and then actually make a compelling case for the latter as the better car.

Well done, Kia. It’s a great commercial, though, I think it would’ve probably been better if you saved this one for Super Bowl LII. Just a thought.

Read more
Lamborghini's Next Performance Car Could Draw Inspiration from the Legendary Miura

Lamborghini’s Next Performance Car Could Draw Inspiration from the Legendary Miura

Lambo’s CEO is hinting on a 21st century version of the legendary Miura

Is it possible that Lamborghini’s planned brand expansion is going to include a future car that will be inspired by one of its most iconic models? It’s too early to tell at this point, but Lamborghini CEO Stefano Domenicali did tell Automotive News that the Italian automaker is open to creating a “21st-century interpretation” of the Lamborghini Miura. Now may not be the time for Lamborghini fans to lose their collective minds over this possibility, but if it does come to fruition, well, that’s a different story altogether.

The question now is whether there’s more to what Domenicali hinted at regarding the possibility of a Miura-inspired supercar being developed in time for a launch date sometime between 2025 and 2030. The former head of Ferrari’s Formula One outfit didn’t dive into the specifics, but his comments could play into the company’s plans to expand its model portfolio beyond the Avantador, Huracan, and the upcoming Urus SUV. A Miura-inspired supercar would certainly fit in with what Lamborghini intends to do with its model lineup moving forward, and just as important, it would ignite a nostalgic call-back to one of the company’s most famous models. If we do see this car in the future, expect Lamborghini to throw all its might into making sure that his 21st-century version of the Miura lives up to the legacy of the original model. That’s going to be a very high bar to meet, but Lambo wouldn’t be doing this if it doesn’t have something special in store for all of us.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

Read more
Lamborghini Strives to Keep the Soul and Avoid Electric Sports Cars for the Time Being

Lamborghini Strives to Keep the Soul and Avoid Electric Sports Cars for the Time Being

There’s just something about a naturally aspirated engine...

There’s just something about a naturally aspirated engine that really complements one’s manhood. It could be a big-block from the oil-hungry 1970s or something newer that’s a bit more fuel efficient. Either way, there’s a certain feeling you get when you fire it up, and the initial rumble radiates through every atom of your body. Sure, turbos and superchargers are fun, but when you can get sheer, unadulterated power from nothing but engine, there’s just something special about it. While the rest of the world is quickly changing over to smaller turbocharged mills and hybrid or all-electric drivetrains, Lamborghini just isn’t feeling the hype, and we probably shouldn’t expect an all-electric sports car with a Lambo badge anytime soon.

According to reports from Car Advice, Lambo’s research and development boss, Maurizio Reggiani, says that the technology is just too expensive and that they still have years left in which they can stick with the current V-10 and V-12 engines that are now in production. “If you talk about super sports cars at the moment, the PHEVs, the electric energy, in general, it is difficult to think it is suitable for a super sports car because that means weight and packaging – otherwise we cannot achieve handling. With regard to hybridization in our super sports car segment, I do believe that we still have years that we can stay with the actual structure of the [current] engines, both V-10 and V-12.”

Keep reading for the rest of the story

Read more
1981 - 1988 Lamborghini Jalpa

1981 - 1988 Lamborghini Jalpa

The last Lamborghini to use a V-8 engine

The Lamborghini Jalpa was a sports car produced between 1981 and 1988. A development of the Silhouette, which was discontinued alongside the Urraco in 1979, the Jalpa was Lamborghini’s entry-level sports car in the 1980s. It was slotted below the iconic Countach, being not only significantly more affordable than the supercar, but also easier to drive in heavy traffic and at slow speeds. Unlike the Countach, the Jalpa was powered by a V-8 engine. Its retirement in 1988 meant the end of the entry-level, affordable Lamborghini until the introduction of the Gallardo, in 2003.

The Jalpa was developed in Lamborghini’s most difficult period financial-wise. Affected by the 1973 financial downturn and the oil crisis, Ferruccio sold the company in 1974, only 11 years since its birth. Purchased by Georges-Henri Rossetti and Rene Leimer, Lamborghini went bankrupt in 1978 and was placed in the receivership of brothers Jean-Claude and Patrick Mimran in 1980. The Mimrans, who purchased the company out of receivership by 1984, were responsible for creating the Jalpa and the LM002 truck, two vehicles that were supposed to expand the brand’s offerings beyond V-12-powered supercars.

The Jalpa was discontinued shorty after the Chrysler Corporation bought Lamborghini from the Mimran brothers in 1987. The Jalpa was the last Lamborghini to feature a V-8 engine. Since 1988, all "Raging Bulls" had either V-12 or V-10 powerplants.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lamborghini Jalpa.

Read more
Lamborghini Huracan RWD Spyder Goes Topless In LA

Lamborghini Huracan RWD Spyder Goes Topless In LA

One year later, Lamborghini drops another bombshell at the LA Auto Show

When Lamborghini unveiled the Huracan LP580-2 at the 2015 Los Angeles Auto Show, a lot of people immediately assumed that a topless version would soon follow. One year later, and at the exact same auto show no less, the Huracan LP580-2 Spyder has arrived.

The good news is that a lot of things about the coupe version of the sports car remains on the soft-top roof version, most notably the naturally-aspirated 5.2-liter V-10 engine that produces 580 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque. Yep, it may have lost a hard roof, but it still packs the same amount of power as the coupe version.

More good news comes in the form of the tech, which is to say that the Huracan LP580-2 Spyder has loads of it, beginning with the Adaptive Network Intelligent Management system (ANIMA), which the driver can control through specific buttons on the steering wheel and choose among a slew of driving modes - Strada, Sport, or Corsa - to suit their preference.

A lot of things about the Huracan LP580-2 Spyder set it up to be the kind of performance-oriented sports car that its coupe counterpart is. That said, the spyder weighs 264 pounds more than the coupe version and that shows itself in the car’s performance times, specifically the 3.6-second time from 0 to 60 mph. That’s 0.2 seconds slower that the coupe version.

Still, everyone knows that the slower acceleration is the price you pay for having a roof retracting mechanism on the car. Either way, it’s still a blisteringly quick and it’s still a Lamborghini Huracan. That’s more than what other performance cars can say about themselves.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

Read more
5,000th Lamborghini Aventador Rolls Of the Production Line

5,000th Lamborghini Aventador Rolls Of the Production Line

It’s no secret that Lamborghini is looking to increase its global sales with help from the upcoming 2017 Lamborghini Urus SUV, but, until the brand’s second utility vehicle arrives later this decade, Sant’Agata Bolognese has an important milestone to celebrate. Specifically, the Italians have just built the 5,000th example of the Aventador, the companies range-topping supercar. With Aventador production up to nearly five units a day, Lambo assembled 5,000 V-12-powered models in a little over four and a half years, a feat that seemed impossible a decade ago.

The 5,000th Aventador to roll out of the factory was a Roadster version painted in Rosso Bia and destined for the Italian market. As usual, it received a naturally aspirated, 6.5-liter V-12 engine rated at 690 horsepower and 508 pound-feet of torque. Besides being impressively powerful, the Aventador is one of the quickest supercars available on the market. The sprint from 0 to 60 mph is achieved in 2.9 seconds, while the quarter-mile takes 10.6 seconds at 137 mph. The Aventador’s top speed is estimated at a mind-boggling 217 mph.

Launched to replace the Murcielago in 2011, the Aventador will probably remain in production until at least 2019. The supercar is available in both coupe and roadster body styles, with limited-production SuperVeloce (SV) variants introduced in 2015.

Continue reading after the jump for the full story.

Read more
1970 - 1976 Lamborghini Jarama

1970 - 1976 Lamborghini Jarama

The Lamborghini Islero was an impressive grand tourer, worthy of its status as a challenger to the Ferrari 365 GT 2+2. Unfortunately, it was stuck between the Miura and Espada in Lamborghini’s lineup; as a result, the comparatively conservative-looking 2+2 didn’t get the attention it deserved. A lingering reputation for poor quality didn’t help. The car was thus redesigned and re-thought. The new vehicle was christened the Jarama and debuted in 1971. Officially, the Jarama is named for a Madrid district known for breeding bulls, in keeping with Lamborghini’s convention. It’s also the name of a race track in Spain, but this appears to be coincidental.

The updated design of the Jarama was still something of a wallflower compared to Lamborghini’s mid-engine supercars, and it was to be the last front-engine V12 2+2 in the Lamborghini lineup.

As it became clear that what Lamborghini’s customers really wanted was extravagant, jaw-dropping road presence, the Jarama faded into the background.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lamborghini Jarama.

Read more
Adventure Drives Showcases The Best Roads In The West: Video

Adventure Drives Showcases The Best Roads In The West: Video

The winter holidays have come and gone, and before you know it, the roads will look a whole lot more inviting. Now is the time to start planning that epic road trip that’s been swimming around in the back of your brain, and if you’re looking for inspiration, just hit play. Chronicling a six-day journey across the western U.S., this ten-and-a-half minute video features a nice mix of sports cars enjoying incredible scenery via winding ribbons of tarmac. This is driving nirvana.

Adventure Drives was responsible for organizing the event, offering participants a departure from the craziness of rallies like the Gumball and Bullrun. Instead, AD focuses on actually enjoying the journey, without the bravado of who got the biggest speeding ticket.

The video starts in Denver and ends in Napa Valley, bouncing between Telluride, Park City, Zion National Park, Las Vegas, Death Valley, and Mammoth Lakes along the way. The caravan is made up of the usual suspects, such as exotics from Lamborghini, Ferrari, and Porsche, but the roster also includes more accessible machines, like a Subaru BRZ, Audi A5 Cabriolet, and a first-gen Acura NSX.

There are plenty of videos out there showcasing the world’s great driving roads, but watching this, you realize you don’t need a passport to enjoy them. So – what are you doing this summer?

Read more
Ford Mustang RTR Vs. Lamborghini Murcielago By Liberty Walk: Video

Ford Mustang RTR Vs. Lamborghini Murcielago By Liberty Walk: Video

It took a lot for Liberty Walk and Phat Five racing to turn a Murcielago into a freaking drift machine, but somehow they did it. Of course, it took some “monster garaging,” if you will. The car has Nissan throttle bodies, a Toyota Celsius steering rack, and even steering knuckles from a Toyota Supra – among many other aftermarket modifications, of course. The end result is a rear-wheel drive, 650-horsepower piece of pleasure. As if that Lambo itself isn’t crazy enough, it’s driver, Daigo Saito, took the car to an abandoned village in Russia to play with Vaughn Gittin Jr’s 550 horsepower Mustang RTR.

I won’t even begin to ruin the video for you, as you absolutely have to see it for yourself. The drift sequences and precision alone are absolutely amazing, let alone the amazing location of the video shoot. The two drivers, and their equally superior cars, wreak havoc in the daylight and moonlight (with a few flares along the way.) The camera angles are amazing, and for this one, you’ll want to wear headphones if you’re not in a setting that allows high volume. The sound of these two cars effortlessly drifting around the Russian village is a treat in itself.

Needless to say, if you don’t watch this video, you’re missing out. So hurry up and hit play. The video has only been posted two days and is already approaching 1.5 million views. Don’t be the only guy at the water cooler Monday morning that didn’t watch it!

Read more
1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

There have been several periods during Lamborghini’s history when it was a one-model marque, but from the late ’60s on into the ’80s, the company really made an effort to have a bigger and more diverse lineup. This is part of why Lamborghini had an SUV long before any other sports/exotic/luxury car company ever dreamed of making one, and also why it had an entry-level V-8 model a full two years before Ferrari brought out the 308. That first entry-level car the Urraco, a reasonably successful but not particularly good car. But when Ferrari brought out a much better entry-level car in 1975, something else was needed.

The result was the Silhouette, and just from the name, you can probably tell it isn’t a usual Lamborghini. Not only does it sound like a brand of ’80s cologne, but it has nothing to do with bulls. And indeed the Silhouette wasn’t really a full-on model of its own. It was based in the Urraco, but had styling much more like the Jalpa, the entry level V-8 model that would succeed the Urraco. This is similar to the role the Reventon played more recently, except that the Silhouette was built right alongside the Urraco for its entire production cycle.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lamborghini Silhouette.

Read more
2015 Lamborghini Huracan By xXx Performance

2015 Lamborghini Huracan By xXx Performance

The Lamborghini Huracan is still a relatively new supercar, having only made its debut at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show. In the year that has passed, there have only been a handful of tuning firms that have taken stabs at creating programs for the supercar.

The latest to do so is xXx Performance, a German tuning firm who is no stranger to developing racy performance programs for some of Sant’Agata’s finest. Remember the work it did on a 2005 Lamborghini Gallardo back in 2013? That program came with twin-turbo upgrades that took the output of the Gallardo to as much as 1,200 horsepower.

Ok, before I get too carried away, this new program for the Huracan doesn’t have that level of power enhancement. What it does have is a series of modifications to the supercar’s exterior, engine, and wheels, all of which combine to create a pretty impressive tuning kit that owners of the Huracan should keep a close eye on. So what if it the tuned up Huracan can’t produce 1,200 horsepower; it’s still good for 690 horsepower. That’s 80 ponies more than the 610-horsepower from the stock model. Given the small number of performance upgrades for the Huracan, xXx Performance’s kit for the newest Lamborghini is as appealing as they come.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lamborghini Huracan By xXx Performance.

Read more
XCAR Reviews The New Lamborghini Huracán: Video

XCAR Reviews The New Lamborghini Huracán: Video

The Lamborghini Huracán entered the market in 2014 with the responsibility of living up to the standards set by its predecessor, the Lamborghini Gallardo. A little over a year since its introduction, the Huracán has proven to be up-to-the-ask as a worthy successor to the Gallardo. Sales of the Lambo’s newest supercar have been robust as wealthy buyers have had no issues splurging for the Huracan. In fact, Lamborghini announced in September 2015 that sales of Lamborghini supercars are headed for a new record as the company expects to beat out the 2,530 units it sold in 2014. The biggest reason, according to Lamborghini, for this record sales volume? You guessed it, the Huracán.

The supercar has lived up to the hype in that regard. But for those who have yet to make that kind of financial commitment, it’s important to know more about the car itself. How does it look? How does it drive? Most importantly, how does it compare to the Gallardo? XCAR sought to answer all of these questions when it recently took a Huracán out for a spin.

The most important thing to remember about the Huracán is that it has a lot of the things that made the Gallardo successful – passionate looks, impressive power, and everyday appeal – but with more state-of-the-art technology that’s apt for the times. For instance, the Huracán can switch between three different drive modes (Strada, Sport, and Corsa), all of which have their specific functions, impacting just about every part of the car, including the gearbox, suspension, steering, exhaust, stability control, and the AWD system. Think of it as fast, faster, and stupid fast.

So far, the Huracán has lived up to enormous pressure of succeeding Lamborghini’s most popular model. It’s a testament to Lamborghini’s ethos of building memorable supercars that not only performs to its billing, but also carries the passion and heart of Feruccio Lamborghini himself. If the man was alive today, he’d be incredibly proud of the newest supercar to bear his name.

Read more
Petrolicious Pays Tribute To Lamborghini Miura P400 S: Video

Petrolicious Pays Tribute To Lamborghini Miura P400 S: Video

As rare as it would be just to see a 1966 to 1974 Lamborghini Miura in real life, I am not holding my breath that I’ll ever get to drive one – and with their high values, I’d probably be too nervous to do so anyway. Fortunately, Petrolicious is shining a spotlight on a gorgeous Lamborghini Miura in its latest video, revealing what is perhaps the best experience of driving this rare Lamborghini without actually being able to.

The owner of this 1970 Lamborghini Miura S is Dennis Varni, who has owned it since 1979. Like all car buffs, he fell in love with the Miura after a brief ride in one in 1970, and less than a decade later, this red Miura was sitting in his driveway. He refers to the Miura as an “Italian hot rod” with its beautiful lines and transverse-mounted V-12, and it’s this engine that really makes this video incredible to watch and listen to.

I would have to imagine that most of the fewer than 800 Miuras ever built are probably tucked away in garages and warehouses, but Varni drives his car. And drives it hard. You’re definitely going to want to turn your speakers up for this one.

Of course, if you can afford a Lamborghini Miura, your car collection is in good shape, and that’s just the case with Varni. His eclectic collection includes sports cars that might rival the Miura’s beauty, like the rare Maserati 200S, or a Jaguar D-Type.

Read more
Audi R8 And Lamborghini Huracan Could Get Five-Cylinder Engine

Audi R8 And Lamborghini Huracan Could Get Five-Cylinder Engine

The Audi R8 and Lamborghini Huracán could both get new engine options that would see their cylinder counts cut in half. According to new reports, the twin-charged 2.5-liter five-cylinder engine recently introduced in the 2015 Audi TT Clubsport Turbo concept at Wörthersee might eventually make its way into both the R8 and Huracán supercars.

Audi has already confirmed the second-generation R8 will not get a V-8, but Audi technical development board member Ulrich Hackenberg recently suggested to Car and Driver that a smaller, boosted engine is needed to hit sales targets in China and other parts of Asia. Lamborghini boss Stephan Winkelmann made similar suggestions, citing tax laws in Asia that significantly increase the cost of cars with big V-10s and even V-8s.

China’s new car tax laws include an annual nine-percent tax on cars with engine capacities over 2.0 liters. That’s manageable, but it ramps up exponentially after that. Cars with engines larger than 4.0 liters get slapped with a 40 percent tax, which puts Audi’s 4.0-liter V-8 in the same tax bracket as its V-10, making the V-8 pretty much a pointless option for that market.

“There are questions of the stability of the tax laws, questions of how much additional volume it would give us, questions of timing, questions of complexity, and questions of whether people in those countries even want us to do it,” Audi Quattro boss Stephan Reil told Car and Driver. “We haven’t yet [started engineering a car like that]. But it has been talked about.”

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more