Back to Lamborghini

Lamborghini Sports Cars

Models

view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
This Video Will Make You a Lamborghini Miura Expert

This Video Will Make You a Lamborghini Miura Expert

Here’s why the Lamborghini Miura is the most iconic Lambo ever built

Ferruccio Lamborghini established his sports car company in 1963 following a conflict with Enzo Ferrari over the clutch of the 250 GT. Lambo launched its first production model the 350 GT, in 1964, while the upgraded 400 GT followed in 1966. But in 1965, the company’s top engineers began working on a race-inspired vehicle with a mid-engined layout.

The result of this effort debuted in 1966 as the Miura, arguably the most iconic car built by Lamborghini. Although it wasn’t the first road-legal mid-engined car, the Miura was the fastest production vehicle and set the standard for high-performance sports cars and supercars. This new video by ISSIMI pays tribute to the car that changed the world in 1966.

Read more
Someone Made a Lamborghini Aventador Out of Cardboard And Gave It Scooter Power

Someone Made a Lamborghini Aventador Out of Cardboard And Gave It Scooter Power

What do you do when you can’t afford a Lambo? You build one out of cardboard!

The Lamborghini Aventador starts from around $420,000 and that’s a sticker the average Joe can’t afford. So what can you do if you want one but you don’t have close to half a million bucks to spare? Well, two enthusiasts from Vietnam built one from cardboard and equipped it with a tiny motorcycle engine.

Read more
Car for Sale: Amazingly Rare, RHD, 1972 Lamborghini Miura SV

Car for Sale: Amazingly Rare, RHD, 1972 Lamborghini Miura SV

It may, occasionally, catch fire but, otherwise, it’s amazing

Lamborghini is known for making some of the world’s most outlandish cars. The Aventador is arguably the last of the old-school greats, a big, heavy supercar with a naturally aspirated V-12 engine positioned behind the seats and its tiny brother, the Huracan, has been a steady seller for years.

But Lamborghini wasn’t always hell-bent on making supercars with its first cars being laid-back grand tourers. It all changed, however, when the Miura arrived. And then, while everyone was still wiping off their drool, Lamborghini struck again with this, the Miura SV.

Read more
Lamborghini Huracan EVO RWD Spyder Hits The Market With Unique Looks

Lamborghini Huracan EVO RWD Spyder Hits The Market With Unique Looks

Not as powerful as the regular model, but more affordable and fun

The Lamborghini Huracan is already an emblematic nameplate and the company’s best selling model to date. However, some die-hard fans aren’t exactly happy with its standard four-wheel-drive layout, so Lambo introduced a rear-wheel-drive model in 2016. Come 2020, and the updated Evo model was also launched in RWD trim. The coupe arrived first in January, but the Spyder followed up in May, just in time for the summer. Just like its coupe counterpart, the Spyder RWD is not as powerful as its AWD sibling, but it offers that old-school RWD feeling that some enthusiasts are after in a Lamborghini.

Read more
Video: The Lamborghini Hurcan Spyder Sounds like a Fighter Jet When it Passes by at Top Speed

Video: The Lamborghini Hurcan Spyder Sounds like a Fighter Jet When it Passes by at Top Speed

The inside view of the topspeed run is cool too...

The Lamborghini Huracan Spyder is no joke when it comes to open-top performance. The 5.2-liter V-10 under the hood is good for 571 horsepower and 398.8 pound-feet of torque, all of which is shunted to the rear wheels via a seven-speed automatic transmission. Even at 3,400 pounds, the Hurcan Spyder can dispatch itself to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds on the way to a top speed of 200 mph. Well, that 200-mph mark is questionable as it takes the absolute perfect conditions, but that’s a story for another day.

The point is that someone took a bone stock Lamborghini Huracan Spyder to Johnny Bohmer Proving Grounds to see just what it’s capable of. The long, impressively flat runway was once used for space shuttles and gives anyone on four wheels up to 2.7 miles of concrete to go like hell before having to let up. Now, the video you’re about to watch was made to showcase what it looks like to hit max velocity in a Hurcan Spyder, but what caught out attention was at the end of the video when we get a side view of the Hurcan blurring by the camera. Is it just us, or does that sound like a fighter jet doing a flyby? I guess we’ll let you be the judge, so enjoy the video and see just how fast the Huracan can go when you put the pedal down!

Read more
A Modern Day Lamborghini Miura - Yay or Nay?

A Modern Day Lamborghini Miura - Yay or Nay?

This Modern Day Lamborghini Miura Looks Great, But We Don’t Think That Lamborghini Will Ever Revive the Name

Ford resurrected the Bronco, Chevy did so with the Blazer, while Acura/Honda wowed us with the new NSX. What if Lamborghini did a similar trickery and revived one of the biggest names in the business - the Miura?

First of all, it would be an enormous surprise because Lamborghini doesn’t do name revivals. Secondly, we do have something remotely similar. If you go right now to the Lamborghini Museum in Sant’Agata Bolognese in Italy, you can the see Murcielago-based 2006 Lamborghini Miura Concept. It looks awesome. But that was almost a decade and a half ago. Today, the revival of the Miura would go a bit differently and we have young Brazilian visual artist Pedro Ruperto to show us how.

The 26-year old envisioned the modern interpretation of the Miura and he garnished it with a few touches currently adorning the exterior of contemporary Lamborghinis.

Read more
Lamborghini Won't Offer the Aventador or Huracan With a Manual Transmission Because It's Too Expensive

Lamborghini Won’t Offer the Aventador or Huracan With a Manual Transmission Because It’s Too Expensive

Who would’ve thought that developing bespoke transmission for limited-edition models would be greenlighted?

Regardless of your take on manual transmissions, you can’t deny the added layer of involvement they provide to the driving experience. This is why it’s sad that modern supercar makers have all but ruled out the usage of such old-school transmissions for the sake of both costs and performance. Lamborghini is one of them although they were close to offering one on some special edition Huracan and Aventador models.

You and I both know that a robotized automatic transmission with one or multiple clutches is quicker at shifting through gears than any biped creature we commonly refer to as a human. In spite of this, you and I both would like to be able to do things our way, at our own pace. Of course, that’s what flappy paddle gearboxes are for, but there’s nothing quite like the added difficulty of a third pedal and a stick between the seats. Lamborghini has been telling us for years that the manual is dead - at least as far as it’s concerned - but the Italians prove they are genuine petrolheads because, in the meantime, they did at least look into it to make sure once again that the initial assessment was right. Props to Sant’Agata for that!

Read more
1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

1976 - 1979 Lamborghini Silhouette

More than just a rebodied Urraco

Lamborghini launched the Silhouette in 1976 as an attempt to appease customers that didn’t buy the Urraco, the company’s first V-8 model, with a car that featured the same underpinnings but a more modern styling in tune with the Countach. Sadly for Lamborghini, it didn’t work out, but Lamborghini still had the Jalpa up its sleeve.

The Silhouette was a more angular-looking sports car, in tone with the Countach. It had square, flared wheel arches, an aggressive nose, and a sleek rear section with two black air vents covering the area aft of the B-pillar. The wheels were also new and they would go on to become a sort of a staple on Lamborghini models. The Silhouette was also one of the few to not be named after a fighting bull or a breed of bulls and the first from Sant’Agata Bolognese to feature a removable targa top.

The Silhouette, in keeping with the budget sportscar ethos pushed forward by Ferruccio when conceiving the Urraco, was never meant to be an out-and-out performer. As such, with a 3.0-liter V-8 behind the seats, the power output was advertised at a docile 266 horsepower - 40 less than a modern-day Seat Leon Cupra R hot hatch- with a resulting top speed of 162 mph or 12 mph less than a de-restricted Audi RS3 hot hatch that you can buy in 2018.

Read more
How Far Can $10 Take You? How About a One-Off Lamborghini Huracan Signed by Pope Francis Himself

How Far Can $10 Take You? How About a One-Off Lamborghini Huracan Signed by Pope Francis Himself

Now’s your chance to win a true, one-off heavenly Lamborghini Huracan

What can your $10 get you? For some people, $10 equates to a few lottery tickets. For others, it’s a pack of cigarettes. That’s great, sure, but what if your $10 can get you a one-off Lamborghini Huracan that bares the signature of none other than His Holiness, Pope Francis? This isn’t a joke, folks. The one-off, white and gold Huracan that Lamborghini gave to Pope Francis back in November 2017 is now up-for-grabs at Omaze. The sweepstakes-slash-charity initiative requires at least a $10 donation to enter the sweepstakes. According to Omaze, proceeds from the contest will go to a “number of causes working to transform lives around the world.” The website is accepting donations ranging from $10 to $5,000. The amount donated correlates to the number of entries you get. Entries will be accepted until January 30, 2019.

Read more
1970 - 1976 Lamborghini Jarama

1970 - 1976 Lamborghini Jarama

Lamborghini’s most tasteful deep cut

The Lamborghini Jarama made its way into production in 1970 as a replacement for the Islero and proved to be the Italian supercar manufacturer’s last front-engined V-12 grand tourer. While shorter than the Espada, the Jarama still offered seating for four and had the same engine.

By the late ’60s, Lamborghini was a bivalent company: it was both offering an out-and-out supercar, the tremendous Miura, and a couple laid-back grand tourers built with comfort, luxury, and practicality in mind. When it came time to replace the smaller of the two tourers, namely the Islero, Lamborghini decided to turn from Carrozzeria Marazzi, who’d been behind the Islero, to Bertone.

The car that resulted was a strange thing: it sat low and wide but was also quite short. It came with Miura-style magnesium wheels but it was way heavier than the mid-engined supercar due to its all-steel construction. The first batch of cars was dodgy at best, in typical Italian fashion, but the Jarama S turned out to be an enjoyable highway runner.

Read more
1973 - 1979 Lamborghini Urraco

1973 - 1979 Lamborghini Urraco

The underrated baby mid-engined Lamborghini of the ’70s

The Urraco heralded Lamborghini’s entry in the budget supercar niche. It was available in a number of guises, the P200, P250, and P300. Less than 800 units of this sleek V-8 mid-engined Italian beauty were sold before production ceased back in 1979. In spite of its rarity, the Urraco still fails to command the kind of prices you’ll see early Dinos being sold for.

Presented at the 1970 Turin Auto Show, the Urraco hit the market two years later as an affordable 2+2 supercar that wasn’t really a supercar and stood in either the Miura’s or the Countach’s shadow throughout its lifespan. Its design, penned by Marcello Gandini during his stint at Bertone, leaves something to be desired as far as dramatism goes with the more dedicated 2-seater Merak from Maserati being clearly the best-looking budget supercar at the time.

For all its shortcomings, many of which were mocked during a Top Gear episode which centered around the Merak, the Dino 308 GT4 and the Urraco, the Urraco was considered a brilliant car by Lamborghini engineers as it incorporated a number of industry firsts and other novel ideas for the early ’70s, many of which have been forgotten as time wore on and the scissor doors of the Countach turned the heads of just about any automotive aficionado.

Read more
The 10 Best Lamborghinis Ever Built

The 10 Best Lamborghinis Ever Built

Italy’s most iconic Bulls!

One of the most iconic sports car manufacturers, Lamborghini was born out of Ferruccio Lamborghini’s frustration over a bad experience with a Ferrari he bought and the way Enzo treated him. Having built tractors since 1948, Ferruccio decided he could do a better sports car and launched Automobili Lamborghini in 1963. But while Ferrari has produced over 50 nameplates to date, Lambo remained a lower profile carmaker. Sant’Agata has only produced 21 models up until 2018, including some limited-edition nameplates based on existing supercars.

Some became iconic from day one, while some gained notoriety as they became classics, A few of them remain somewhat anonymous due to the period they were launched or their subpar performance. Still, there are plenty of cars to choose from to round up a Top 10 list, and we did just that. It includes both modern and classic models, but I went for specific versions instead of nameplates, as these usually spanned over many years and included many different iterations. Check out my list below and let me know if I should’ve included other models too in the comments box.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
Lamborghini Huracan Spyder Gets A Facelift

Lamborghini Huracan Spyder Gets A Facelift

But, why? The current car doesn’t look old from any angle

Have you ever heard of supercars getting mid-life facelifts? The Lamborghini Huracan is an exception. The car has been spied twice with heavy camouflage, clearly indicating that the Huracan is being refreshed for the market. The last update seen on the Huracan range was at the Geneva Motor Show in March this year, when Lamborghini introduced the Spyder Performante, but now it looks like theHuracan Spyder is due for some changes inside and out. Get ready to witness the Huracan’s rebirth!

Read more
Watch a Lamborghini Huracan Performante Race a MIG-29K Fighter Jet

Watch a Lamborghini Huracan Performante Race a MIG-29K Fighter Jet

Italy’s finest versus Russian military engineering

We’ve seen plenty of supercar battles on airstrips before, but this one’s a bit different from the rest. Posted to Twitter by user @Chopsyturvey, it’s an abbreviated 44-second clip that shows a head-to-head acceleration battle between a Lamborghini Huracan Performante and a MIG-29K fighter jet, combining horsepower and firepower into a single brief video.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
2019 ARES Project Panther

2019 ARES Project Panther

An Italian boutique supercar-maker gears up to make a good first impression

Although it’s just a few years old, ARES Design is already creating a bit of a name for itself. Founded back in 2014 by Dany Bahar, former CEO at Lotus, the firm started out as a customization shop for high-end automobiles. Now, however, ARES Design is looking to break into the world of boutique supercar production, and Project Panther is its first effort to step up to the big leagues.

Continue reading to learn more about the ARES Project Panther.

Read more
Lamborghini restores Espada and Islero for their 50th anniversary celebrations

Lamborghini restores Espada and Islero for their 50th anniversary celebrations

Iconic Lambos will also go on a tour across central Italy

In a time when modern supercars are defined by how outlandish they can look, the Lamborghini Espada and Lamborghini Islero provide reminders that there once was a time when “sexy” didn’t always equate to having the most menacing-looking car in the business. The two Italian icons are still considered two of the finest Lamborghinis ever created, and as the two celebrate their golden jubilee, Lamborghini announced that it has successfully restored the Islero and the Espada that belong to the Lamborghini Museum.

Read more
2018 Lamborghini Huracan Performante by Novitec

2018 Lamborghini Huracan Performante by Novitec

Still waiting on those engine mods, though

Only a few days ago, McLaren revealed that mad 600LT. Just then I wondered what it would be like to see a “baby” McLaren LT go against a “baby” Lamborghini Performante on the other side of the track. But then, Novitec (FYI - a German tuning company) and its Torado division revealed the Huracan Performante Novitec. It is like a Performante version of the Performante Lamborghini. Maybe an overkill, but Novitec did it so well, I don’t even care. I need to see the 600LT race against this now.

Read more
Pray to the Heavens That The Lamborghini L595 Roadster Becomes Reality

Pray to the Heavens That The Lamborghini L595 Roadster Becomes Reality

It says "2018" on the Zagato website so let’s cross our fingers that it comes to life

Four years ago, Italian coach builder Zagato unveiled the Lamborghini 5-95 Zagato, a one-off creation that spawned into a limited edition series because deep-pocketed customers couldn’t get enough of it. Fast forward to 2018, and we could be in for a case of déjà vu. Sitting on Zagato’s website for all the world to see is a rendering of the Lamborghini L595 Zagato, a droptop version of the 5-95 Zagato that we saw in 2014. It’s unclear if Zagato has plans to build this version, but the image was accompanied by “2018,” a sign that we could see this car come to life sometime this year.

Read more
Car for Sale: 1,400HP, Tuned-Out 2006 Lamborghini Gallardo

Car for Sale: 1,400HP, Tuned-Out 2006 Lamborghini Gallardo

There’s no turning back after getting in the seat of this rocket

For the confused few who actually think that Lamborghinis are slow, Underground Racing has become the go-to place to get the supercar’s power figures up to “appreciable” levels. The North Carolina-based tuner is known for turning Lambos into certified eaters of worlds, and it just so happens that one of them is up for sale now.

Read more