Filter by: Vehicle Types Topics
view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
Marchettino Drives a Modern Legend - the 2018 Lancia Stratos: Video

Marchettino Drives a Modern Legend - the 2018 Lancia Stratos: Video

Reborn modern Stratos driven up a technical road

The Lancia Stratos is one of those instantly recognizable automotive cars, which is why I’m happy that a new one has been launched, albeit as a super limited production model that is not even worth fantasizing about owning.

Read more
Petrolicious Features the Beautiful and Brutal 1974 Lancia Stratos Group 4: Video

Petrolicious Features the Beautiful and Brutal 1974 Lancia Stratos Group 4: Video

Introducing "The Rally Queen"

The Lancia Stratos was the first car to be constructed from the ground up with the sole purpose of going rallying. As legendary as it is fast, the Stratos still races in historical rally events, and this particular one won the 2017 European Historic Rally Championship with former endurance and GT racer Erik Comas behind the wheel.

Comas, a former Le Mans podium-finisher with Pescarolo, has owned four Stratoses over the years, but this one is the one he calls "The Rally Queen." It was formerly owned by Lancia test driver Claudio Maglioli who worked on the development of the Stratos. Comas took it back to Biella, Italy, where the car was originally maintained to have it refreshed before he returned it to action in 2015. That year, he won the Italian Historic Rally Championship. No wonder he hails the handling characteristics as "perfect."

Read more
2018 Lancia Delta HF Integrale - Futurista Coupe

2018 Lancia Delta HF Integrale - Futurista Coupe

An exquisite reimagining of a rally icon, now built for the modern era

The Lancia Delta HF Integrale was an absolute legend in the world of motorsports. Forged in the fires of Group A rally racing, the boxy Italian compact collected a number of wins throughout its career, earning the respect and adoration of countless racing fans. Eugenio Amos counts himself among those fans, and from his passion, he’s created the Lancia Delta Futurista, a restomod that elevates the legend to an all-new level, all while keeping in the spirit of the original.

The Lancia Delta Futurista was designed and built by Amos’ company, Automobili Amos, a customization shop out of Italy. The restomod project is similar to the Jag E-Type-based Eagle Speedster and 911-based Singer Porsches we’ve seen before, mixing high-level modernization and performance with old school, nostalgia-inducing cues. Amos likens the Lancia Delta Futurista to a “romantic vision” that breaks from a world perceived as “too aseptic, too fast, that runs like the wind, superficial and intangible.”

Continue reading to learn more about the Lancia Delta Futurista.

Read more
1974 Lancia Stratos HF Stradale

1974 Lancia Stratos HF Stradale

A true rally legend, straight out of Italy

Let’s do a little thought experiment. Say you’re looking to create one of the greatest road cars in existence. Where do you start? The answer should be obvious - racing, or, more specifically, a homologation special. These are machines birthed from the womb of competition, tuned ever so slightly to meet the rules of the road and sold to mere mortals like you and me. The Lancia Stratos HF Stradale is one such vehicle. Plucked from the sideways insanity of the WRC, the Stratos comes from a time before AWD, a time when simple, brutal machines vied for supremacy by dancing on the limits of adhesion offered by the rear wheels alone.

The “HF” in the name stands for “High Fidelity,” Lancia’s go-to designation when it comes to its high-performance models, while “Stradale” is Italian for road, indicating the car’s street worthiness. Powered by a Ferrari-sourced V-6 and stripped down to only the bare essentials, the Stratos is often credited with changing the world of rally as the first car designed specifically for competition in the sport. Throw in the fact Lancia made nearly 500 examples for the road, and what you’re left with is a truly fantastic car.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lancia Stratos HF Stradale.

Read more
Sound the Alarm! The "New" Stratos is Coming!

Sound the Alarm! The "New" Stratos is Coming!

This is not a drill, people!

40 years after its production ended, the Lancia Stratos still warms the hearts of millions of people all over the world. It took a while, but finally — finally! — The Stratos is coming back. It’s not going to come from Lancia, but it’s still going to be the modern-day Stratos that we’ve all been waiting decades for. Even better, there are three versions that are being developed, including a road-going supercar, a GT racer, and Lord have mercy, a Safari rally-spec racer. This is the new Stratos, ladies, and gentlemen. You can start fainting now.

Read more
Video of the Day: Jeremy Clarkson Talks about the Lancia 037

Video of the Day: Jeremy Clarkson Talks about the Lancia 037

This is one segment from The Grand Tour that you shouldn’t miss

The Lancia 037 holds a special place in the hearts of a lot of people. It’s one of those models that wasn’t supposed to exist, but homologation requirements obligated Lancia to build a little over 200 road-going models of the 037. The one you see here with Jeremy Clarkson is one of the 207 production 037s that were built. 35 years after it was produced, the Lancia 037 still looks as incredible as it’s always been.

The video of Clarkson’s time behind the wheel of the 037 is short, but if you haven’t seen the full segment, it’s something that you need to watch. Rarely do we get to see the three hosts trade in their skits and crass humor for a compelling and insightful segment that tells a gripping story of a car’s history and impact in the industry. For whatever reason, The Grand Tour adopted this kind of approach in this segment. The result is arguably the best segment of the show’s second season, possibly even its entire run.

Brashness aside, Clarkson is regarded as an authority in the auto industry. Far too often, he doesn’t use that platform to really espouse the real stories behind some of the cars he reviews. This time, he did, and we appreciate him for it. The Lancia 037 has a great story to tell, and for once, we’re pleased that Jeremy Clarkson was the one to tell it.

Read more
1985 Lancia Delta S4 Stradale

1985 Lancia Delta S4 Stradale

A Group B racer for the road

Fleeting, brutal, and wickedly fast – these are the words that best describe the Group B era of the WRC, a period now known as the Golden Age of Rally. In just a few short years, Group B spawned some of the most legendary race cars to ever churn terra firma, but few capture the unbridled insanity of mid-‘80s rallying quite like the twin-charged, mid-ship, AWD monster known as the Lancia Delta S4. Although Group B regulations were notoriously vague, competitors still had to produce a limited number of homologation specials for public consumption, and as such, Lancia dialed back the boost on the S4, added a thin veneer of civility, and tacked on some license plates. The result is called the Stradale.

Don’t let the civilian appointment fool you – under the skin, the Stradale is still very much a rally hero, with the same cutting-edge go-fast technology as its competition-spec sibling. Unfortunately, this abundantly obvious performance heritage makes it difficult to find an example in its original factory condition, as many were either converted into club racers straight out of the box, crashed, or both. That said, if you know where to look, and you’ve got an extra six figures burning a hole in your pocket, there are a few out there that are still up for grabs.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1985 Lancia Delta S4 Stradale.

Read more
Fiat Chrysler May Bring Back Lancia Delta Integrale

Fiat Chrysler May Bring Back Lancia Delta Integrale

There have been a lot of legendary rally cars over the years; cars that have brought their manufacturers all kinds of motorsport credibility. But there can only be one car that has won more WRC races than any other, made by the marque with more constructor titles than any other. That car is the Lancia Delta Intergrale, a towering legend of a machine from a marque that has almost completely ceased to exist. But word is that a case is being to bring back the Delta Integrale, with Lancia existing solely as a one-model brand for the foreseeable future.

The thinking is that the Delta Integrale name is one that is still spoken of in hushed tones, and for FCA not to capitalize on that is to leave money on the table. A lot happened has to Lancia since the days it reigned supreme in WRC, not least of which being that Alfa Romeo took over the role of Fiat’s sport sub-brand. But this is part of why no case is being made for reviving the whole brand, and really, so long as there was a Delta Integrale, not many enthusiasts would mind that being the only Lancia.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
1982 Lancia 037 Stradale

1982 Lancia 037 Stradale

Before the Ford Focus, before the Subaru WRX, and before the Mitsubishi EVO, there was the Lancia 037 Stradale. This vehicle is arguably one of the greatest rally cars ever created, despite winning only a single manufacturer’s title in the 1983 season of the World Rally Championship. You see, the Lancia 037 accomplished that feat as a mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive platform running against the seemingly indomitable Audi Quattro. Even as the beast from Ingolstadt kicked off the sport’s inevitable mass migration to all-wheel-drive grip, the Lancia 037 somehow clawed its way to victory over the mighty German competitor. The pitched battles fought between these two titans has become the stuff of rally legend, and now, the Lancia 037 sits as the final rear-wheel-drive car to win a WRC manufacturer’s championship.

As part of the homologation rules set forth by the FIA, Lancia was required to create 207 street versions of its 037 for public consumption. Essentially a full-blown rally racer for the street, this vehicle gives no quarter to comfort or practicality. Everything about it connotes a single mindedness, an all-encompassing drive to velocity. A long list of Italian speed-makers can attach their name to this car, including Abarth, Dallara, and Pininfarina. Lift up the lightweight bodywork, and you’ll find a steel subframe hiding underneath. The power plant behind the cockpit produces 205 horsepower, which is quite impressive for a 2.0-liter engine made in the early 80s. Even the interior on the streetcar incorporates features specifically designed for use by a co-pilot.

Most of the 207 original street Lancia 037s have disappeared into the mists of time, with many receiving a full transformation to competition race trim and the consequent beating such an outfit entails. Actually running across an original is extremely rare, but every so often, you get incredible finds like the example pictured here. This thing is about as cherry as they come: chassis number 045, single owner from new, less than 14,000 km (8,699 miles) on the odometer, unmodified and in showroom condition. It even has the original Pirelli Cinturato P7 tires. Yes, even the tires are original.

This car is a thick slab of rally history, a physical manifestation of a long-gone era in one of the most exciting sports in the world. And now, it’s going up for auction.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1982 Lancia 037 Stradale.

Read more
Video: Jay Leno Drives The 1967 Lancia Fulvia Sport 1.3 Zagato

Video: Jay Leno Drives The 1967 Lancia Fulvia Sport 1.3 Zagato

Lancia may be doomed for eternity after parent Fiat decided the brand will sell only one model and only in Italy as of 2015, but the Turin-based manufacturer will live forever in the hearts of car enthusiasts the world over. It’s cars such as the Delta, Fulvia, Montecarlo, Aurelia, Flaminia, and the Stratos that helped Lancia make a name for itself, one that will survive no matter what Marchionne decided to do with it.

Alfa Romeo may be the brand to own if you want to be a true petrol head, as Jeremy Clarkson once said, but Lancias were capable of delivering the same amount of thrill together with a better build quality. The Fulvia is a great example of Lancia craftsmanship, a vehicle described as "an engineering tour the force" that eventually went on to win the first Rally Championship for the Italians.

Built between 1963 and 1976, the Fulvia was offered in several configurations and with a host of V-4 engines. The Fulvia Coupe is the most famous of them, but no iteration was as intriguing as the Zagato-bodied Sport model. No wonder this Italian coupe was recently featured in Jay Leno’s Garage and driven by America’s most fervent car collector. Unlike its Coupe sibling, the Zagato had a rather awkward design. While Pininfarina and Bertone were known to have created the most beautiful cars of the era, Zagato crafted a host of unusual looking bodies in the 1960s, one of which is the Fulvia Sport 1.3.

It had a protruding front end, a pointy, Corvette Stingray-like rear and a hatch. It was a massive departure from the coupe model Piero Castagnero designed in 1965. Thankfully enough, some Zagato-bodied Fulvias have lived to this day and their owners are more than anxious to tell their story. Hit the play button above for a 26-minute history lesson and drive test of the Fulvia Sport 1.3 Zagato, a vehicle you’re not likely to encounter on your daily route anytime soon.

Click past the jump to see an image of the Fulvia Coupe prototype Lancia built back in 2006.

Read more
Video: Tribute to Lancia 037 Group B

Video: Tribute to Lancia 037 Group B

2014 was a sad year for Lancia. It’s when we found out Sergio Marchionne was planning to reduce the automakers lineup to a single model by discontinuing the Delta, and both the Chrysler-based Thema and Voyager. As if that wasn’t enough, the remaining Lancia Ypsilon will be sold only in Italy, which essentially means this Italian automaker is on a quick road to extinction. For me, a big Lancia enthusiast, that’s downright terrible. Sure, present-day Lancia is just a shadow of what it used to be, but that’s no reason to pull the plug on it and let it die. On the contrary, Marchionne should devise a plan to bring it back in the spotlight, much like he’s doing with Alfa Romeo.

It remains to be seen whether Fiat will come to its senses or not, but in the meantime I’m here to present you with one of Lancia’s glorious past moments. Thanks to Petrolicious, which has made a habit of showcasing some of the most important cars the industry has created, we can have a closer look at the Lancia 037, the racer that won the World Rally Championship and paved the way for the stunning first-generation Delta.

The 037 saga began in 1980, when Lancia started working on a rally car to comply with the then-new FIA Group B regulations. The Italians opted for a mid-engine layout and turned to Abarth for a few tips. Fitted with a supercharged, 2.0-liter, four-cylinder powerplant that developed 265 ponies at first and 325 in its final Evolution 2 configuration, the 037 became a successful rally car, winning the series in 1983 with German ace Walter Rohrl behind the wheel.

With FIA regulations requiring at least 200 road-going version to be built for homologation, Lancia also rolled out a Stradale version, with its engine detuned to 205 horses. Although less aggressive than its rally-course sibling, the 037 Stradale is now a collectible in its own right. If only Lancia would look back on its legendary cars and move toward reviving its heritage...

Read more
2013 Lancia Ypsilon Elefantino

2013 Lancia Ypsilon Elefantino

The Lancia Ypsilon is a car that doesn’t get enough of the attention it deserves. Well, the Italian automaker hopes to change that with the release of a ’trendy’ new special edition called the Elefantino.

No, Lancia did not harm any elephants in the making of this vehicle. What they did do was give it a pretty impressive aesthetic makeover that gives us an idea on what the Ypsilon can look alike if the words "trendy and fashionable" were attached to it.

That’s the appeal of the Ypsilon Elefantino, especially to a younger market looking to exercise their fresh and hip vibe with a car that shares in that same, shall we say, "freshness".

On its own, the Ypsilon Elefantino carries plenty of powertrain options, each of which comes with its own price tag.

You can find out what made the Ypsilon Elefante appealing to us, as well as the engine and pricing options, after the jump.

Read more

Latest Videos:

2013 Lancia Delta S by Momodesign

2013 Lancia Delta S by Momodesign

This is not the first time that Lancia has collaborated with MomoDesign, but if you ask us, this latest Delta S special edition is one of the best results. Customers interested can already order the new Delta S by MomoDesign and prices will start from €23,400 (about $30,000 at the current exchange rates).

This special edition is designed especially for those male customers that are looking for a distinctive style. According to Lancia, the S in the title stands for the car’s three main values: Style, Substance and sports Seduction.

The model is distinguished by dark-chrome finishes, burnished headlights and 18-inch wheels finished with dark shadow treatment. For the interior, the two companies have combined a stylistic elegance with the sportiness required by the S models. Customers receive a gloss-black central console, speedometer with yellow shades and special sporty leather.

Hit the jump to read more about the 2013 Lancia Delta S by Momodesign.

Read more
2012 Lancia Flavia Red Carpet Special Edition

2012 Lancia Flavia Red Carpet Special Edition

Lancia may not get all the love compared to other manufacturers of its ilk, but when they rolled out a special edition Flavia at the Venice Film Festival, we have to give it the recognition it deserves.

Called the Flavia Red Carpet Special Edition, the unique build was the result of a collaboration between Lancia and Poltrona Frau.

There’s not much in the way of exterior modifications for the Flavia Red Carpet, but inside, the posh red leather interior has the unmistakable quality and distinct stamp of the Italian interior, furniture design and leather upholstery company.

Suffice to say, the partnership between the two companies go back a long way, back to the 20’s when their respective founders, Vincenzo Lancia and Renzo Frau, began a partnership that has lasted for almost 100 years. Back then, Lancia turned to Frau to dress up the interior of the legendary Thema 8.32 and since then, the two companies have become brothers-in-arms in the auto industry.

Under the hood of the Flavia Red Carpet is a 2.4-liter engine that produces 170 horsepower and is mated to a six-speed automatic transmission. There aren’t any performance modifications, but when it comes to being the star of the show, the Flavia Red Carpet Special Edition sits high and mighty at the Venice Film Festival.

Read more

Video: Lancia Stratos at Rallye Isla Mallorca

The Lancia Stratos has always been a legend in the automotive industry from the moment it was launched back in 1974 to the second time around when it was revived in 2010. Of course, the model revealed in 2010 was a one-off version based on a Ferrari F430 Scuderia, but it was still pretty cool. Well, now we have found a video of the car in action at the Rallye Isla Mallorca. This video shows both on-board driving actions and exterior shots of the Lancia Stratos.

As a reminder, the 2010 Lancia Stratos is powered by a 4.3 liter V8 engine that delivers a total of 503 HP and is mated to a 6-speed transmission. The model sprints from 0 to 60 mph in around 3.4 seconds and can hit a top speed close to 200 mph.

view all
Read more
Rumormill: Lancia May Turn the Chrysler 300 into a Two Door

Rumormill: Lancia May Turn the Chrysler 300 into a Two Door

Ahh, rumors in the automotive world spread just about as fast as the rumor that the captain of the football team was kissing the head of the girls’ chess team under the bleachers at the homecoming dance… And we love ‘em. The latest rumor is an interesting one that actually has a fair amount of validity.

Lancia is one of the many companies under the protective umbrella of Fiat Automobiles S.p.A. and it loves to borrow its models from Chrysler, add a few small touches, and call it their own. One of the latest models to make the Lancia conversion was the Chrysler 300, which prances around Europe bearing the name “Lancia Thema” (image above). That’s not the rumor though, as we already know all about that.

The rumors being whispered are that Lancia really wants a full-size coupe for its European market and the only car available to possibly satisfy this itch is the Chrysler 300. Ask any custom coach builder and he will tell you that turning a four-door body into a two-door car is not as tough as you may think, but going the other direction is nearly impossible.

So, if Lancia decides to hack up the B-pillar on the 300, shorten the opening a little and slap two fewer doors on the 300, would this model make it to the U.S.? The two-door full size car essentially died with the downsizing of vehicles in the late-1970s, but a small niche market may be in order.

This also spawns the possibility of Chrysler finally satisfying its nostalgia buffs by taking the two-door blueprints that Lancia would create and turn that into a two-door Charger. The pair of extra doors have always been a thorn in the side of Charger buffs, so Chrysler could breathe a little extra life into both models – not like the 300 needs more life, but extra sales can’t hurt – by offering two-door models of each.

This is certainly an interesting rumor to ponder and we are more likely to see pigs fly before we see a two-door 300 and Charger, but we’re telling you there’s a chance.

view all
view all
Read more